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  • Jillian Mayer is an artist and filmmaker living in South Florida. Her video works and performances have been premiered at galleries and museums internationally such as MoMA, MoCA:NoMi, BAM, Bass Museum, the Contemporary Museum of Montreal with the Montreal Biennial (2014) and film festivals such as Sundance, SXSW, and the New York Film Festival. She was recently featured in Art Papers, ArtNews and Art Forum discussing identity, Internet and her artistic practices and influences.
  • York Chang (b. 1973, St. Louis, MO) is an interdisciplinary artist who uses forensic and archival information systems as supports for poetic gestures and alternate histories, in order to interrogate the aesthetic conventions of authority which often serve to blur the line between fiction and reality. He earned both his BFA (1996) and Juris Doctorate (2001) from University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). York Chang lives and works in Los Angeles, CA, and is represented by Greene Exhibitions. 
     
  • Presidents' Day Holiday

    Feb 15| Academic Dates
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    Otis offices are closed for the Holiday.

  • Oliver Kellhammer is an independent artist, writer and researcher, who seeks, through his botanical interventions and social art practice, to demonstrate nature’s surprising ability to recover from damage. His recent work has focused on the psychosocial effects of climate change, cleaning up contaminated soils, reintroducing prehistoric trees to landscape damaged by industrial logging and cataloging the ecology of brownfield ecologies. He currently works as a lecturer in sustainable systems at Parsons in New York City.
     
  • In this performance I try to summarize In search of past time with my own words, as a story of another time which reveals itself contemporary. I deliver my own intimate and personal perception of this book which radiates in my life. Each performance is another opportunity to explore different zones of the book, proceeding at random, inspired by an aleatory and fickle memory. 
     
  • The Architecture/Landscape/Interiors Department at Otis College of Art and Design is pleased to announce the George H. Scanlon Foundation Lecture REDUX.4 by IÑAKI ÁBALOS

  • Multimedia and digital artist Parker Ito is known for his manipulations of found imagery and web-based systems of communication. Ito’s works often makes use of non-traditional art materials, such as reflective 3M Scotch-lite fabric, automotive paint, and vinyl. He is known for the high volume of his output—sometimes under different names—and his sense of humor. He does not consider himself a conceptual artist, but says his work is rooted in “konceptualism,” which he describes as “similar to when people spell the word ‘cool,’ ‘kewl’ or ‘kool.’”
     

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Matt Warren '06 MFA

Dec 16, 2013
China trip
Spotlight Category: Alumni
In May 2011, I participated in BASEbeijing, a program es tablished by L.A.-based architects Robert Mangurian and Mary-Ann Ray, to document the changing face of rural China, and provide alternatives and possibilities for new and sustainable environments. The association with BASE provided an opportunity to become part of an authentic, little-seen part of China for eight weeks, where we could build on already-established foundations. A tourist who happened on these rural villages two hours north of the city would likely be met with an air of hostility and intrigue.
 
With two students from Tulane University, I examined the public spaces in the village in terms of their social routines and interactions. The village resembled a ghost town for much of the day, as it consisted of elderly residents whose children live and work in the city, and grandchildren who board at school during the week. Although this lack of energy added to the tranquil setting, it also reflected its social environment. Residents worked in the fields from dawn until dusk and, with no commu nal spaces in which to mingle after dark, returned to their respective homes. The prospect of entertaining friends and neighbors did not seem to be culturally significant. The idea of isolation was prominent, both in geographical location and social interaction.
 
During our visits, we observed a solitary pillow that followed the shade, traversing the alleyways and streets to accommodate the seldom-seen residents during intervals of relaxation. Public space grew out of simple necessity and comfort. This pillow, made out of a recycled pair of pants, became an icon and generator of place. Building on their traditions, we imagined that introducing more pillows could help to create a gathering and communal space. We produced 40 pillows from images we had taken, printed them on canvas, and stuffed them with peppercorn seeds and recycled plastic bags. We presented the pillows to the residents on our last trip, along with a slideshow of images and videos of the village, for them to gain insight of their home through our alien eyes. The pillows represented our collaborative time spent in the village as a souvenir, but not in the form of an intrusive construct that would ultimately become unwanted and unused. Some images were specific to particular locations, others were portraits of individuals or transcripts of a conversation. Ultimately, they were offerings of thanks for allowing us to share their village life.
 
The BASE experience also offered an insight into rapid urban development and an opportunity to be part of the Beijing art scene, through meetings with such well-known artists as Ai Weiwei, Wang Quingsong, and He Yungchang. Our studio was based in Caochangdi, a prominent arts district, and despite the demanding schedule there was time to explore Forbidden Cities and climb Great Walls. My favorite souvenir is my Chinese name that translates, depending on whom you ask, as ‘Space cowboy, riding on the open plain howling at moon.' 
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