Events
  • Sitting in Sound

    Jul 15| Special Event
    More
    Jesse Fleming, A Theory of Everything, 2015, Installation view.
     
  • Opening Reception

    Jul 15| Special Event
    More

    L: Nora Slade, Kate Mouse Mickey Moss, 2014, Photo transfer and fabric paint on sweatshirt, cardboard and found objects. R: Marisa Takal, I Love My Sister, 2016, Oil on canvas, 65 x 50 inches.

    Opening Reception for the two-person exhibition of work by the Los Angeles-based artists Nora Slade and Marisa Takal

    Light snacks and refreshments.

    Exhibition on view July 15 - August 19, 2017.

    Bolsky Gallery located across from Ben Maltz Gallery, ground floor, Galef Center for Fine Arts.

  • Amelia Gray is the author of the short story collections AM/PM, Museum of the Weird, and Gutshot, as well as the novels Threats and, most recently, Isadora, published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. Her fiction and essays have appeared in The New Yorker, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Tin House, and VICE. She is winner of the New York Public Library Young Lions Award, of FC2's Ronald Sukenick Innovative Fiction Prize, and a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award. 

  • Image: BijaRi, On the rooftops of Santa Domingo-Savio neighborhood as part of the project Contando con Nosotros, 2011

  • Luis J. Rodriguez was Los Angeles Poet Laureate from 2014-2016. The twenty-fifth edition of his first book, Poems Across the Pavement, won a 2015 Paterson Award for Sustained Literary Achievement. He has written fourteen other books of poetry, children’s literature, fiction, and nonfiction, including the best-selling memoir Always Running: La Vida Loca: Gang Days in L.A. Rodriguez is also founding editor of Tia Chucha Press and co-founder of Tia Chucha’s Centro Cultural & Bookstore in the San Fernando Valley. In 2016 Tia Chucha Press produced the largest anthology of L.A.-area poets, Coiled Serpent: Poets Arising from the Cultural Quakes & Shifts of Los Angeles. Rodriguez’s last memoir It Calls You Back: An Odyssey Through Love, Addiction, Revolutions, and Healing was a finalist for the 2012 National Book Critics Circle Award. His latest poetry collection Borrowed Bones appeared in 2016 from Curbstone Books/Northwestern University Press.

  • Raised in Philadelphia, with roots in South Africa and Trinidad, Zinzi Clemmons’ writing has appeared in Zoetrope: All-Story, Transition, The Paris Review Daily, and elsewhere. She has received fellowships and support from the MacDowell Colony, Bread Loaf, the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, and the Kimbilio Center for African American Fiction. She is co-founder and former Publisher of Apogee Journal, and a Contributing Editor to LitHub. She teaches literature and creative writing at the Colburn Conservatory and Occidental College. Her debut novel, What We Lose, as well as a second title, are forthcoming from Viking.

  • Louise Sandhaus is a graphic designer and graphic design educator. She was previously Director of the Graphic Design Program at CalArts where she currently is faculty. Her recent book on California graphic design, Earthquakes, Mudslides, Fires and Riots: California and Graphic Design 1936-1986, co-published by Metropolis Books and Thames & Hudson, has received laudatory reviews from The New York Times, The Guardian, Eye, and Creative Review. The book received the Palm d’Argent for best art book at FILAF (International Festival of Art Books and Films on Art).

O-Tube

Matt Warren '06 MFA

Dec 16, 2013
China trip
Spotlight Category: Alumni
In May 2011, I participated in BASEbeijing, a program es tablished by L.A.-based architects Robert Mangurian and Mary-Ann Ray, to document the changing face of rural China, and provide alternatives and possibilities for new and sustainable environments. The association with BASE provided an opportunity to become part of an authentic, little-seen part of China for eight weeks, where we could build on already-established foundations. A tourist who happened on these rural villages two hours north of the city would likely be met with an air of hostility and intrigue.
 
With two students from Tulane University, I examined the public spaces in the village in terms of their social routines and interactions. The village resembled a ghost town for much of the day, as it consisted of elderly residents whose children live and work in the city, and grandchildren who board at school during the week. Although this lack of energy added to the tranquil setting, it also reflected its social environment. Residents worked in the fields from dawn until dusk and, with no commu nal spaces in which to mingle after dark, returned to their respective homes. The prospect of entertaining friends and neighbors did not seem to be culturally significant. The idea of isolation was prominent, both in geographical location and social interaction.
 
During our visits, we observed a solitary pillow that followed the shade, traversing the alleyways and streets to accommodate the seldom-seen residents during intervals of relaxation. Public space grew out of simple necessity and comfort. This pillow, made out of a recycled pair of pants, became an icon and generator of place. Building on their traditions, we imagined that introducing more pillows could help to create a gathering and communal space. We produced 40 pillows from images we had taken, printed them on canvas, and stuffed them with peppercorn seeds and recycled plastic bags. We presented the pillows to the residents on our last trip, along with a slideshow of images and videos of the village, for them to gain insight of their home through our alien eyes. The pillows represented our collaborative time spent in the village as a souvenir, but not in the form of an intrusive construct that would ultimately become unwanted and unused. Some images were specific to particular locations, others were portraits of individuals or transcripts of a conversation. Ultimately, they were offerings of thanks for allowing us to share their village life.
 
The BASE experience also offered an insight into rapid urban development and an opportunity to be part of the Beijing art scene, through meetings with such well-known artists as Ai Weiwei, Wang Quingsong, and He Yungchang. Our studio was based in Caochangdi, a prominent arts district, and despite the demanding schedule there was time to explore Forbidden Cities and climb Great Walls. My favorite souvenir is my Chinese name that translates, depending on whom you ask, as ‘Space cowboy, riding on the open plain howling at moon.' 
Tags
Otis College Ranked 6th in Nation by The Economist