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  • Otis Books is pleased to publish Tim Erickson’s debut collection of poetry, Egopolis, a textual journey through destruction, resistance, city, and the Ego, from ancient times to the present day. Erickson’s work has appeared in the Chicago Review, Western Humanities Review, and the Salt Anthology of New Writing. He lives in Salt Lake City.

  • Otis Graduate Writing students will read from their works-in-progress.

  • David Treuer is an Ojibwe Indian from Leech Lake Reservation in northern Minnesota and currently teaches at USC. He is the author of the novels Little, The Hiawatha, The Translation of Dr. Apelles, named a Best Book of the Year by the Washington Post, as well as a critical work, Native American Fiction: A User's Manual. In 2012, he published another nonfiction work, Rez Life.

  • Angela Flournoy’s first novel The Turner House was a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection. Her fiction has appeared in The Paris Review, and she has written for The New Republic, The Los Angeles Review of Books and elsewhere. Flournoy has taught at the University of Iowa and Trinity Washington University. She lives in Los Angeles.

  • Susan Choi’s first novel, The Foreign Student, won the Asian-American Literary Award for fiction, and her second novel, American Woman, was a finalist for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize. Her most recent novel, A Person of Interest, was a finalist for the 2009 PEN/Faulkner Award. With David Remnick she co-edited the anthology Wonderful Town: New York Stories from The New Yorker. A recipient of fellowships from the NEA and the Guggenheim Foundation, and in 2010, the inaugural winner of the PEN/W.G. Sebald Award, Choi lives in Brooklyn.

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Billy Al Bengston

Billy Al BengstonBilly Al BengstonBilly Al BengstonBilly Al Bengston

 

Billy Al Bengston ('57) was born in 1934 at Dodge City, Kansas. From 1953 to 1957 he studied art in Los Angeles and San Francisco, finishing at the Los Angeles County Art Institute (now Otis College of Art and Design.) He had his first one-person exhibition at the Ferus Gallery in 1958. His mentor at Otis, Peter Voulkos, taught his students to defy standardized rules about making art. Unlike Voulkos, who worked in ceramics, Bengston decided early on to paint.

Bengston began to develop a style involving centralized imagery such as the heart or iris within a square. At the same time, he adopted the tools and materials of the automobile and motorcycle customizer: industrial lacquers and the spray gun. Throughout the 1960's, he used chevrons or sergeant stripes, first with oil on masonite paintings and later in "Dentos," a series using dented and defiled aluminum sheets.

According to art historian Andrew Perchuk, he is one of a number of “West Coast artists, including Robert Irwin and Ken Price, who were instrumental in redefining the terms of artistic identity in the early '60s by insisting that subcultural affinities and leisure-time activities (surfing, car customizing) were at the foundation of their artistic personas.”

http://www.patriciafauregallery.com/nav/a_bengston.html
http://lacma.wordpress.com/2010/02/08/stephanie-barron-on-billy-al-bengston/