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Events
  • Otis Books is pleased to publish Tim Erickson’s debut collection of poetry, Egopolis, a textual journey through destruction, resistance, city, and the Ego, from ancient times to the present day. Erickson’s work has appeared in the Chicago Review, Western Humanities Review, and the Salt Anthology of New Writing. He lives in Salt Lake City.

  • Otis Graduate Writing students will read from their works-in-progress.

  • David Treuer is an Ojibwe Indian from Leech Lake Reservation in northern Minnesota and currently teaches at USC. He is the author of the novels Little, The Hiawatha, The Translation of Dr. Apelles, named a Best Book of the Year by the Washington Post, as well as a critical work, Native American Fiction: A User's Manual. In 2012, he published another nonfiction work, Rez Life.

  • Angela Flournoy’s first novel The Turner House was a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection. Her fiction has appeared in The Paris Review, and she has written for The New Republic, The Los Angeles Review of Books and elsewhere. Flournoy has taught at the University of Iowa and Trinity Washington University. She lives in Los Angeles.

  • Susan Choi’s first novel, The Foreign Student, won the Asian-American Literary Award for fiction, and her second novel, American Woman, was a finalist for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize. Her most recent novel, A Person of Interest, was a finalist for the 2009 PEN/Faulkner Award. With David Remnick she co-edited the anthology Wonderful Town: New York Stories from The New Yorker. A recipient of fellowships from the NEA and the Guggenheim Foundation, and in 2010, the inaugural winner of the PEN/W.G. Sebald Award, Choi lives in Brooklyn.

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Bruce Yonemoto

Bruce YonemotoBruce Yonemoto

 

Media artist Bruce Yonemoto ('79, MFA) has collaborated with his brother Norman on film, video, and multimedia installations since 1978. The Yonemotos’ work is based on notions of difference and visibility, and much of their work appropriates commercial film and television imagery. Operating between the world of the art gallery and media clichés and myths of American culture, the Yonemotos exploit this relationship of art and commerce. Their multimedia installations, many of which address issues of Japanese-American identity, also explore the relationship of the individual in the context of a dominant corporate culture.

Bruce has received grants from the NEA, Rockefeller Foundation and the AFI, and is the recipient of the Maya Deren Award for Experimental Film and Video. Solo exhibitions include the InterCommunciation Center in Tokyo, Philadelphia’s Institute of Contemporary Art, and the Kemper Museum. His work is in the permanent collections of the MOMA, Cornell University, and the Hara Museum of Contemporary Art in Tokyo.

On the occasion of its 90th Anniversary, Otis commissioned Yonemoto’s installation “Simulations," which he describes as the result of his desire to recreate a childhood icon as “a hyper-real representation of Disneyland’s Matterhorn thus finally making Disney’s mountain the allegorical referent, the “real” Matterhorn of our collective memory.”

www.bruceyonemoto.net