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Events
  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring Matthew Brandt, a Los Angeles-based artist. Read more about him here.
     
  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring Kerry Tribe, an artist working primarily in film, video, and installation. Read more about her here.
  • You are invited to a Movies that Matter Special Screening of the powerful new film shaping the debate about rape on college campuses, The Hunting Ground, on Tuesday, September 15 at 7:15 PM in the Otis Forum.  The Hunting Ground is a startling exposé of sexual assaults on U.S. colleges, institutional cover-ups and the brutal social toll on the victims and their families from the Academy Award-nominated filmmaking team of Kirby Dick and Amy Ziering.
  • Otis Books is pleased to publish Tim Erickson’s debut collection of poetry, Egopolis, a textual journey through destruction, resistance, city, and the Ego, from ancient times to the present day. Erickson’s work has appeared in the Chicago Review, Western Humanities Review, and the Salt Anthology of New Writing. He lives in Salt Lake City.

  • The Architecture/Landscape/Interiors Department at OTIS College of Art and Design is pleased to announce a lecture by 

  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring Hassan Khan, an artist who lives and works in Cairo, Egypt. Read more about him here.

  • Otis Graduate Writing students will read from their works-in-progress.

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Camille Rose Garcia

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Camille Rose Garcia ('92) has built an acclaimed body of work that has been exhibited at the Merry Karnowsky Gallery and the Grand Central Art Station (CSU, Fullerton) in Los Angeles, the Roq la Rue Gallery in Seattle, and the Jonathan LeVine Gallery in N.Y.C.

Often using narrative and fairytale structures, her work is recognized by its gorgeously eerie dystopias. Her upbringing in the shadow of Disneyland and sunny Orange County fueled her disenchantment with society, leading her toward subversive art and music.

Influenced by authors Phillip K. Dick and William Burroughs, as well as politically conscious bands like The Clash and Dead Kennedys, Garcia’s depictions of cartoon children living in wastelands are critical commentaries on the failures of capitalism. Her works examine themes of decadence, denial and illusion within the framework of Empire.

Regarding her brutally honest work, Garcia notes, “The Earth is older than humans and will rebound, but the fate of our species seems to be precarious at best. I try to be positive and use humor in my work, even while knowing this.”

Garcia's work has appeared in Modern Painters, Juxtapoz, Rolling Stone, Flaunt, and Blab magazines, and in The Saddest Place on Earth. Her work is in the permanent collections of LACMA and the San Jose Museum of Art.

One reviewer of her book succinctly reports that “Nightmarish and beautiful, [Garcia is] one of the most unique and hauntingly original artists of our time.”

www.camillerosegarcia.com