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Events
  • Otis Books is pleased to publish Tim Erickson’s debut collection of poetry, Egopolis, a textual journey through destruction, resistance, city, and the Ego, from ancient times to the present day. Erickson’s work has appeared in the Chicago Review, Western Humanities Review, and the Salt Anthology of New Writing. He lives in Salt Lake City.

  • Otis Graduate Writing students will read from their works-in-progress.

  • Exquisite Beauty is the first retrospective and publication to document the eye-dazzling ceramics created by Ralph Bacerra (1938–2008), a Los Angeles–based artist known for his innovative approach to surface embellishment. Curated by Jo Lauria, the exhibition features more than ninety of the artist’s finest pieces—dramatic, highly decorated vessels and sculptures that have never before been the focus of a major exhibition or publication.

  • Opening Reception for Ralph Bacerra: Exquisite Beauty

  • David Treuer is an Ojibwe Indian from Leech Lake Reservation in northern Minnesota and currently teaches at USC. He is the author of the novels Little, The Hiawatha, The Translation of Dr. Apelles, named a Best Book of the Year by the Washington Post, as well as a critical work, Native American Fiction: A User's Manual. In 2012, he published another nonfiction work, Rez Life.

  • Angela Flournoy’s first novel The Turner House was a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection. Her fiction has appeared in The Paris Review, and she has written for The New Republic, The Los Angeles Review of Books and elsewhere. Flournoy has taught at the University of Iowa and Trinity Washington University. She lives in Los Angeles.

  • Susan Choi’s first novel, The Foreign Student, won the Asian-American Literary Award for fiction, and her second novel, American Woman, was a finalist for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize. Her most recent novel, A Person of Interest, was a finalist for the 2009 PEN/Faulkner Award. With David Remnick she co-edited the anthology Wonderful Town: New York Stories from The New Yorker. A recipient of fellowships from the NEA and the Guggenheim Foundation, and in 2010, the inaugural winner of the PEN/W.G. Sebald Award, Choi lives in Brooklyn.

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Dean Tavoularis

Dean TavoularisDean TavoularisDean Tavoularis

 

Identifying Dean Tavoularis (‘55, Fine Arts) as Francis Ford Coppola’s production designer does not fully encapsulate his design career in and beyond Hollywood. His rich collaboration with Coppola led to such classics as The Godfather films, Apocalypse Now, The Conversation, One From the Heart, Rumble Fish, The Outsiders, Tucker, and New York Stories.

According to Tavoularis, “when I was young, I attended art school, [but] there were no film schools to speak of then, though this was L.A. I went to movies and lost myself in them. Their settings registered but I was not aware of art direction in film and I never said to myself: “This is what I want to do.”

“Very often with Dean,” remembers Coppola, “even early on when I didn’t know if I agreed with him, I learned that his instincts were very good and that later on I would like very much his idea even if it wasn’t immediately something I liked."

Other directors with whom Dean collaborated on his more than 30 films and five Academy Award nominations include Arthur Penn (Bonnie and Clyde), Michelangelo Antonioni (Zabriske Point), Roman Polanski (The Ninth Gate), Wim Wenders (Hammet) and Warren Beatty (Bullworth).

“He attained a higher reality, that of poetry,” notes writer Jean-Paul Scarpitta. “Any form of spectacle is for him a visual feast, a challenge, and a source of inspiration. In his art, he doesn’t dwell on magic, visual deception, optical illusion, or unreality... His penetrating eyes allow him to watch and feel things deeply, which leads him to capture what others are not privy to see: the gimmicks, the artifices, the tricks, the element of life upon which the veil of illusion is cast. In his mind there is a clear parallel between painting and cinema, in that he considers one and the other as different yet compatible means to create an illusory world which only exists in a dimension of its own."