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  • Otis Books is pleased to publish Tim Erickson’s debut collection of poetry, Egopolis, a textual journey through destruction, resistance, city, and the Ego, from ancient times to the present day. Erickson’s work has appeared in the Chicago Review, Western Humanities Review, and the Salt Anthology of New Writing. He lives in Salt Lake City.

  • Otis Graduate Writing students will read from their works-in-progress.

  • David Treuer is an Ojibwe Indian from Leech Lake Reservation in northern Minnesota and currently teaches at USC. He is the author of the novels Little, The Hiawatha, The Translation of Dr. Apelles, named a Best Book of the Year by the Washington Post, as well as a critical work, Native American Fiction: A User's Manual. In 2012, he published another nonfiction work, Rez Life.

  • Angela Flournoy’s first novel The Turner House was a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection. Her fiction has appeared in The Paris Review, and she has written for The New Republic, The Los Angeles Review of Books and elsewhere. Flournoy has taught at the University of Iowa and Trinity Washington University. She lives in Los Angeles.

  • Susan Choi’s first novel, The Foreign Student, won the Asian-American Literary Award for fiction, and her second novel, American Woman, was a finalist for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize. Her most recent novel, A Person of Interest, was a finalist for the 2009 PEN/Faulkner Award. With David Remnick she co-edited the anthology Wonderful Town: New York Stories from The New Yorker. A recipient of fellowships from the NEA and the Guggenheim Foundation, and in 2010, the inaugural winner of the PEN/W.G. Sebald Award, Choi lives in Brooklyn.

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Gajin Fujita

Gajin FujitaGajin FujitaGajin Fujita

 

Born in 1972 to Japanese parents, Gajin Fujita ('97) wasted no time in establishing himself in the world of art, first while honing his style as a graffiti artist on the streets of East Los Angeles, and later at L.A. Louver and museums such as LACMA, Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art (Kansas City) and several international venues in Switzerland, Greece, and Belgium.

Luckman Gallery Director Julie Joyce said of Fujita's work, "His striking color and gold leaf panels depict the same distinguished, mythological figures that may be found in the venerated Japanese tradition of tattoo art as well as ukiyo-e prints - images distributed to the masses in the Edo period yet which resonate today with amazing magnificence."

Fujita blends Eastern techniques (anime, partitioned screens), and elements (geishas, warriors, demons), with Western, urban imagery (Latino graffiti, U.S. pop culture imagery) in a way that is stunning and vibrant, yet harmonious.

His startling works embody the cultural and class contradictions that are an integral part of urban Los Angeles. He constantly explores how artistic traditions are both maintained and altered as they move across stylistic and national borders.

According to the artist himself, "I kind of look at myself as a hip-hopper, the way of a DJ would sample all sorts of great music from the past - sounds and beats. I'm just doing it with visuals."

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