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Events
  • Presidents' Day Holiday

    Feb 15| Academic Dates
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    Otis offices are closed for the Holiday.

  • Oliver Kellhammer is an independent artist, writer and researcher, who seeks, through his botanical interventions and social art practice, to demonstrate nature’s surprising ability to recover from damage. His recent work has focused on the psychosocial effects of climate change, cleaning up contaminated soils, reintroducing prehistoric trees to landscape damaged by industrial logging and cataloging the ecology of brownfield ecologies. He currently works as a lecturer in sustainable systems at Parsons in New York City.
     
  • Emily Kendal Frey is the author of the poetry collections The Grief Performance, selected for the Cleveland State Poetry Center's 2010 First Book Prize by Rae Armantrout, and Sorrow Arrow, as well as the the chapbooks Frances, The New Planet, and Airport. The winner of the Poetry Society of America's Norma Farber First Book Award, Frey's poetry has appeared in the journals Octopus and the Oregonian. She lives in Portland.

    Seating is limited.

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  • Performance : Proust in one hour

    by Véronique Aubouy

    Duration : 60 minutes chrono

    In this performance I try to summarize in 60 minutes In search of past time with my own words, as a story of another time which reveals itself contemporary. I deliver my own intimate and personal perception of this book which radiates in my life. Each performance is another opportunity to explore different zones of the book, proceeding at random, inspired by an aleatory and fickle memory.

  • Rear Window

    Kristin Moore
    Thesis Exhibition
    Feb 16th-19th, 2016

    Reception:

    Thursday, Feb 18th, 6-9PM

    Bolsky Gallery
    Otis College of Art and Design
    9045 Lincoln Blvd. 
    Los Angeles, CA 90045 
    310.846.2614


    Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat-Sun 12pm-4pm

     

  • The Architecture/Landscape/Interiors Department at Otis College of Art and Design is pleased to announce the George H. Scanlon Foundation Lecture REDUX.4 by IÑAKI ÁBALOS

  • Mr. Yang Chen worked in real estate development companies for eight years and in architecture design companies for fourteen years, serving as architect, General Manager, and Executive President. From 2002 to 2007 he was General Manager of China Construction Design International (CCDI) Shanghai and COO of its headquarters in Shenzhen. He played a significant role in CCDI’s transition from a regional company of around 100 employees to a national corporation of over 3000 employees.

O-Tube

Hideo Date

Hideo DateHideo DateHideo Date

 

Hideo Date was born in Osaka, Japan, and emigrated to California in 1923. After graduating from high school, he enrolled at Otis but left after a year to pursue the study of traditional ‘nihonga’ brush painting in Japan. This style melded the strong use of line in Japanese painting with Western techniques of perspective and modeling.

Date returned to L.A. where, during the late 1920s and 1930s he says that he and his fellow artists “were influenced by Orient across the Pacific just as N.Y. was influenced by Europe across the Atlantic. He was part of the so-called "Independents," a group of L.A.-based artists who rejected modernism and described their work as “Linear-composition.”

Date and his colleagues fell under the influence Stanford MacDonald-Wright, who oversaw the Los Angeles Art Students League and was one of the originators of Synchronism, the “orchestration” of colors in paintings based on “major” and “minor” color scales —as well as the avant-garde art scene. Macdonald-Wright’s works impressed Date, who admitted: “I was flabbergasted, such colors I had never seen before.”

Date spent the 1930s creating art and exhibiting through groups such as the College Art Association, the Foundation of Western Art, the Los Angeles Oriental Artists Group, and the Los Angeles Art Association. Because he held onto nearly all of his work, he had to make his living from odd jobs, once working on a mural at Mary Pickford’s mansion. He also depended on the generosity of friends, the occasional commission, and private teaching.

Art exhibitor Hammond Sadler once described Date’s work as being “primarily interested in linear movement and color. Combining these elements in a manner never attempted by the older Japanese painters, he has scorned the strictly traditional for ‘Datean.’ Particular note of his work in watercolor must be made. The finish, developed by him, is unsurpassed in its jewel-like surface.”

The outbreak of World War II sent Date to Wyoming’s Heart Mountain concentration camp, where he taught art privately to other Japanese-American inmates. After the war, he went to New York and traveled extensively, including trips to Italy and France.

“Over his lifetime,” writes Japanese-American National Museum curator Karin Higa, “Date had preferred not to sell his artwork even when he had the chance.” But in 1999, Date finally decided to donate more than 190 works to the L.A.’s Japanese American National Museum.

 

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