Events
  • Bring family and friends to reconnect with fellow alumni at the studio of Albert Valdez ('10) following Brewery ArtWalk, an open studio weekend with over 100 participating resident artists.

    Parking is located inside the Brewery campus.  

    Visit www.breweryartwalk.com for directions and other information. 

  • Otis Radio: Our Story`

    May 01| Special Event
    More

    Creative Action and the Otis Community Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

     

    This week from 4:00 - 5:00 pm is Our Story. Join DJ Wormlord (Maggie Gilbert), DJ Ace (Grace Kanchana), and DJ Mango (Stacy Li) as we have real talk in real time. Don't miss out!

     

    Listen online at KLMU.

    All shows will be simulcast on 96.1FM in the Otis Commons and archived on otisradio.tumblr.com

  • Creative Action and the Otis Community Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

     

    This week from 5:00 - 6:00 pm is The Girls Room with DJ Lonesome (Jaclyn Arellano), DJ Filth (Mady Preece), DJ Duchamp’s Urinal (Carly Goldstein). In this political climate, it is finally time to take charge of our own bodies and image. No more housewife norms to determine what a woman should look like. Join us in conversation with the tools of music and noise to express what it means to be a woman. We will challenge the definitions and misconceptions about masculinity and femininity, creating a space where women can feel free to ask questions and get answers from other women.

    Listen: http://edg-ord-kxlu.streamguys1.com/klmu

  • Zeal Harris is known for contemporary, seductive, colorful, caricaturesque, political, urban-vernacular, story paintings. She is a Los Angeles based visual artist and has been in exhibitions in Port Au Prince at Haiti’s Ghetto Biennale; in New York at the Caribbean Culture Center of the African Diaspora; in Arizona at The Mesa Contemporary Arts Museum; and in Los Angeles at the California African-American Museum, The Makeshift Museum, 18th Street Arts Center, Launch LA, and EXSLA at The Brewery.  Zeal has an MFA in Studio Art from Otis College of Art & Design. She occasionally teaches, works on public art projects, and works with community arts organizations.

  • Jocelyn Casas presents a solo exhibition for her Graduate Thesis at The Bolsky Gallery, Otis College of Art & Design, on view May 1st - 7th, 2017. There will be a closing reception on Thursday, May 4, 6-9pm.

  • Each year, the Benefit black-tie gala features Los Angeles' largest fashion runway show with more than 70 professional models in 125-plus fashion designs for women, men, and juniors. Approximately 800 guests— a creative crowd of leaders in fashion and entertainment— get a glimpse of the future of fashion design from those who invent it, Otis College fashion students.

  • Patterns Bigger Than Any of Us
    Jesse Fleming / Pat O
    'Neill

    A two-person exhibition of recent large-scale video installations from Los Angeles-based artists Jesse Fleming and Pat O’Neill. Each artist raises questions in his work about the self in relation to others, collective norms, and the built environment. They direct us to see the links and fissures in our lives and the larger systems that we attempt to grapple with—from science to spirituality, and the spaces they straddle.

O-Tube

Hideo Date

Hideo DateHideo DateHideo Date

 

Hideo Date was born in Osaka, Japan, and emigrated to California in 1923. After graduating from high school, he enrolled at Otis but left after a year to pursue the study of traditional ‘nihonga’ brush painting in Japan. This style melded the strong use of line in Japanese painting with Western techniques of perspective and modeling.

Date returned to L.A. where, during the late 1920s and 1930s he says that he and his fellow artists “were influenced by Orient across the Pacific just as N.Y. was influenced by Europe across the Atlantic. He was part of the so-called "Independents," a group of L.A.-based artists who rejected modernism and described their work as “Linear-composition.”

Date and his colleagues fell under the influence Stanford MacDonald-Wright, who oversaw the Los Angeles Art Students League and was one of the originators of Synchronism, the “orchestration” of colors in paintings based on “major” and “minor” color scales —as well as the avant-garde art scene. Macdonald-Wright’s works impressed Date, who admitted: “I was flabbergasted, such colors I had never seen before.”

Date spent the 1930s creating art and exhibiting through groups such as the College Art Association, the Foundation of Western Art, the Los Angeles Oriental Artists Group, and the Los Angeles Art Association. Because he held onto nearly all of his work, he had to make his living from odd jobs, once working on a mural at Mary Pickford’s mansion. He also depended on the generosity of friends, the occasional commission, and private teaching.

Art exhibitor Hammond Sadler once described Date’s work as being “primarily interested in linear movement and color. Combining these elements in a manner never attempted by the older Japanese painters, he has scorned the strictly traditional for ‘Datean.’ Particular note of his work in watercolor must be made. The finish, developed by him, is unsurpassed in its jewel-like surface.”

The outbreak of World War II sent Date to Wyoming’s Heart Mountain concentration camp, where he taught art privately to other Japanese-American inmates. After the war, he went to New York and traveled extensively, including trips to Italy and France.

“Over his lifetime,” writes Japanese-American National Museum curator Karin Higa, “Date had preferred not to sell his artwork even when he had the chance.” But in 1999, Date finally decided to donate more than 190 works to the L.A.’s Japanese American National Museum.

 

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