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  • For decades, the Los Angeles–based artist Lita Albuquerque has blurred distinctions between Land art and Light and Space on increasingly grander scales, whether it be building installations surrounding the pyramids in Egypt or placing sculptures across Antarctica to mirror the formation of the stars. Her cosmic explorations continue with two new bodies of work that are currently being shown at Kohn Gallery in Hollywood, from January 9 through February 27, 2016, and at USC’s Fisher Museum of Art, from January 26 through April 10, 2016.

  • Karaoke Kart

    May 05| Special Event
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    Otis Radio students, Caroline Dillon, Ibrahim Ghulam and Forouzan Safari, present The Karaoke Kart! Join them for a sing-a-long on the 4th floor of Ahmanson, or listen to the live radio broadcast in the Cafe (or on 96.1 FM).

  • Otis Fine Arts presents For The Time Being, the 2016 BFA Senior Exhibition. The show will run May 9-15 with a public reception on Saturday, May 14, 6-9 pm.

  • Annual Exhibition Preview

    May 13-15, 2016

    CELEBRATE WITH US

    Join us for an exhibition and celebration of work by the next generation of creative professionals in:

    Architecture/Landscape/Interiors
    Communication Arts: Advertising Design, Graphic Design, Illustration
    Digital Media: Animation, Game and Entertainment Design, Motion Design
    Fashion Design: Costume Design

  • May 13-15, 2016

    CELEBRATE WITH US

    Join us for an exhibition and celebration of work by the next generation of creative professionals in:

    Architecture/Landscape/Interiors
    Communication Arts
    : Advertising Design, Graphic Design, Illustration

O-Tube

Hideo Date

Hideo DateHideo DateHideo Date

 

Hideo Date was born in Osaka, Japan, and emigrated to California in 1923. After graduating from high school, he enrolled at Otis but left after a year to pursue the study of traditional ‘nihonga’ brush painting in Japan. This style melded the strong use of line in Japanese painting with Western techniques of perspective and modeling.

Date returned to L.A. where, during the late 1920s and 1930s he says that he and his fellow artists “were influenced by Orient across the Pacific just as N.Y. was influenced by Europe across the Atlantic. He was part of the so-called "Independents," a group of L.A.-based artists who rejected modernism and described their work as “Linear-composition.”

Date and his colleagues fell under the influence Stanford MacDonald-Wright, who oversaw the Los Angeles Art Students League and was one of the originators of Synchronism, the “orchestration” of colors in paintings based on “major” and “minor” color scales —as well as the avant-garde art scene. Macdonald-Wright’s works impressed Date, who admitted: “I was flabbergasted, such colors I had never seen before.”

Date spent the 1930s creating art and exhibiting through groups such as the College Art Association, the Foundation of Western Art, the Los Angeles Oriental Artists Group, and the Los Angeles Art Association. Because he held onto nearly all of his work, he had to make his living from odd jobs, once working on a mural at Mary Pickford’s mansion. He also depended on the generosity of friends, the occasional commission, and private teaching.

Art exhibitor Hammond Sadler once described Date’s work as being “primarily interested in linear movement and color. Combining these elements in a manner never attempted by the older Japanese painters, he has scorned the strictly traditional for ‘Datean.’ Particular note of his work in watercolor must be made. The finish, developed by him, is unsurpassed in its jewel-like surface.”

The outbreak of World War II sent Date to Wyoming’s Heart Mountain concentration camp, where he taught art privately to other Japanese-American inmates. After the war, he went to New York and traveled extensively, including trips to Italy and France.

“Over his lifetime,” writes Japanese-American National Museum curator Karin Higa, “Date had preferred not to sell his artwork even when he had the chance.” But in 1999, Date finally decided to donate more than 190 works to the L.A.’s Japanese American National Museum.

 

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