Events
  • Mexican artist Yoshua Okón’s videos blur the lines between documentary, reality, and fiction. He collaborates closely with his actors (often amateurs who are also the subjects of the work) to create sociological examinations that ask viewers to contemplate uncomfortable situations and circumstances.
  • Dana Johnson is the author of the short story collection In the Not Quite Dark. She is also the author of Break Any Woman Down, winner of the Flannery O’Connor Award for Short Fiction, and the novel Elsewhere, California.

  • Gallery 169 will be hosting the Otis College of Art and Design Communication Arts Graphic Design Junior Show, "5328," displaying a selection of work made over the five thousand twenty eight hours that make up the fall and spring semesters of the academic year. Work will include collected posters, publications, and typographic projects.
  • Clay, Body is a solo exhibition from artist Sydney Aubert: Unapologetically fat, crass, and sexual, a ceramics artist who also works in video, and whatever other materials arouse her in the moment. Exhibition will be on view from Monday, April 24 - Friday, April 28 at the Bolsky Gallery, Otis College of Art and Design. On view by appointment only, please contact the artist at sydney.aubert@gmail.com Reception: Thursday, April 27 | 6pm-9pm Bolsky Gallery, Otis College of Art and Design

  • Audrey Wollen is a feminist theorist and visual artist based in Los Angeles. Wollen uses social media, such as Twitter and Instagram, as platforms for her work on Sad Girl Theory, a theory which posits that internalized female sadness can be used as a radical and political action, separate from masculinized forms of protests such as anger and violence. She introduces this form of protest as an alternative to masculinized anger and violence.
  • Bring family and friends to reconnect with fellow alumni at the studio of Albert Valdez ('10) following Brewery ArtWalk, an open studio weekend with over 100 participating resident artists.

    Parking is located inside the Brewery campus.  

    Visit www.breweryartwalk.com for directions and other information. 

  • Otis Radio: Our Story`

    May 01| Special Event
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    Creative Action and the Otis Community Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

     

    This week from 4:00 - 5:00 pm is Our Story. Join DJ Wormlord (Maggie Gilbert), DJ Ace (Grace Kanchana), and DJ Mango (Stacy Li) as we have real talk in real time. Don't miss out!

     

    Listen online at KLMU.

    All shows will be simulcast on 96.1FM in the Otis Commons and archived on otisradio.tumblr.com

O-Tube

Rick Owens

Rick OwensRick Owens

 

The Paris-based American fashion designer Rick Owens (‘81) enjoys prominence in the international fashion world. His edgy, rough-hewn designs are sometimes described as “glunge” [glamour + grunge], and are worn by the likes of Courtney Love, Madonna and Helena Bonham Carter. Owens sells tens of millions of dollars’ worth of clothes each year, in 250+ high-end fashion stores around the world.

“Think of Rick Owens as the Ben Franklin of fashion,” writes Fashion Wire Daily Paris, “an American in Paris, a novel inventor, a rabid iconoclast, and an individualist blessed, or blemished, with the whiff of the sexually perverse. Admired at home in the United States, both were hailed in Paris — Franklin for his sharp wit and fertile mind, Owens for his unique vision and successful resuscitation of nearly moribund fur label Revillon. Though they arrived as celebrities in Paris, touted as influential players in the métier of choice, they both came from modest backgrounds — Benjamin from Massachusetts and Rick from Porterville, California.”

After Otis, Owens did knock-offs in L.A. before cutting patterns at a sportswear company owned by his now-wife Michele Lamy. He started selling his designs at Charles Gallay, and a few years later had negotiated a contract with Maxfield; by 1999, his line was a top seller at Barneys. In 2001, he signed a distribution deal with an Italian agency, and an Annie Leibovitz spread in Vogue further propelled his career. In 2002, he won the Council of Fashion Designers of America Perry Ellis Emerging Talent Award. Owens began his longstanding collaboration with stylist, Panos Yiapanis, and showed his first runway collection in New York in 2002. Since 2003, he has worked out of Paris where he doubly serves as creative director for the furrier Revillon. Some of his pieces were used to create the look for Emily Blunt’s character in the 2006 film The Devil Wears Prada. Owens was awarded a Cooper-Hewitt National Design Award, and his second store in New York's Tribeca district opened in 2008.

“With each new favorable notice,” writes The New Yorker, “Owens seems more determined to prove his independence from the fashion establishment. He doesn’t worry that his provocativeness will alienate customers or critics. [And though] he gives few interviews, doesn’t employ a publicist, and has never advertised his line, his diffidence seems to only enhance his cachet among fashion editors and insiders.”

“I have a simple long silhouette that I started out with,” says Owens in Image Gallery, “and still sell those same pieces the most since day one of my business. These are my foundations. But each season allows me to experiment with some new proportions to refresh my foundation.

“My look is about an appreciation of teenage angst without actually having the angst,” he has been known to say, and compares his style to a Brancusi sculpture: “(Just) a slab of metal on a hunk of wood, but it's about the right piece of metal, the right hunk of wood and the perfect gesture.”

 

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