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Events
  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring Matthew Brandt, a Los Angeles-based artist. Read more about him here.
     
  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring Kerry Tribe, an artist working primarily in film, video, and installation. Read more about her here.
  • You are invited to a Movies that Matter Special Screening of the powerful new film shaping the debate about rape on college campuses, The Hunting Ground, on Tuesday, September 15 at 7:15 PM in the Otis Forum.  The Hunting Ground is a startling exposé of sexual assaults on U.S. colleges, institutional cover-ups and the brutal social toll on the victims and their families from the Academy Award-nominated filmmaking team of Kirby Dick and Amy Ziering.
  • Otis Books is pleased to publish Tim Erickson’s debut collection of poetry, Egopolis, a textual journey through destruction, resistance, city, and the Ego, from ancient times to the present day. Erickson’s work has appeared in the Chicago Review, Western Humanities Review, and the Salt Anthology of New Writing. He lives in Salt Lake City.

  • The Architecture/Landscape/Interiors Department at OTIS College of Art and Design is pleased to announce a lecture by 

  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring Hassan Khan, an artist who lives and works in Cairo, Egypt. Read more about him here.

  • Otis Graduate Writing students will read from their works-in-progress.

O-Tube

Scott Williams

Scott WilliamsScott WilliamsScott Williams

 

Scott Williams (’90, Fashion Design) is Creative Director of Sport Innovation and Olympics at NIKE.

For the 2011 London Olympics, Williams designed the track suit worn by Sanya Richardson-Ross, who won a gold medal in the 400m race. Among many other projects, Williams has been involved with the Nike Innovation team of sportswear designers who came up with the TurboSpeed kit.

The culmination of 12 years of research and more than 1,000 hours of wind tunnel testing, the new streamlined Olympic kit is what Nike calls a “zero distraction” garment. Scanning technology maps of athletes’ bodies to the nearest millimeter ensured that the uniforms fit like a second skin.“This is the most minimal way we’ve had to finish a garment,” explains Scott.

As their fastest uniform to date, it uses “Zoned Aerodynamics” to redirect air in targeted areas; dimpled swaths of the “AeroSwift” fabric “trip” air on the limbs, which can reach speeds of up to 47 MPH. According to Williams, “Nike studied hundreds of textures when fashioning the uniforms, the aesthetic and aerodynamic benefit derived from their results.”

In 2011, Williams acted as a fashion design mentor at Otis, sharing his cutting-edge knowledge base, and teaching the students about the finer points of designing for a large corporation, as well as design in general.