Events
  • Gallery 169 will be hosting the Otis College of Art and Design Communication Arts Graphic Design Junior Show, "5328," displaying a selection of work made over the five thousand twenty eight hours that make up the fall and spring semesters of the academic year. Work will include collected posters, publications, and typographic projects.
  • Clay, Body is a solo exhibition from artist Sydney Aubert: Unapologetically fat, crass, and sexual, a ceramics artist who also works in video, and whatever other materials arouse her in the moment. Exhibition will be on view from Monday, April 24 - Friday, April 28 at the Bolsky Gallery, Otis College of Art and Design. On view by appointment only, please contact the artist at sydney.aubert@gmail.com Reception: Thursday, April 27 | 6pm-9pm Bolsky Gallery, Otis College of Art and Design

  • Audrey Wollen is a feminist theorist and visual artist based in Los Angeles. Wollen uses social media, such as Twitter and Instagram, as platforms for her work on Sad Girl Theory, a theory which posits that internalized female sadness can be used as a radical and political action, separate from masculinized forms of protests such as anger and violence. She introduces this form of protest as an alternative to masculinized anger and violence.
  • Bring family and friends to reconnect with fellow alumni at the studio of Albert Valdez ('10) following Brewery ArtWalk, an open studio weekend with over 100 participating resident artists.

    Parking is located inside the Brewery campus.  

    Visit www.breweryartwalk.com for directions and other information. 

  • Otis Radio: Our Story`

    May 01| Special Event
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    Creative Action and the Otis Community Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

     

    This week from 4:00 - 5:00 pm is Our Story. Join DJ Wormlord (Maggie Gilbert), DJ Ace (Grace Kanchana), and DJ Mango (Stacy Li) as we have real talk in real time. Don't miss out!

     

    Listen online at KLMU.

    All shows will be simulcast on 96.1FM in the Otis Commons and archived on otisradio.tumblr.com

  • Creative Action and the Otis Community Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

     

    This week from 5:00 - 6:00 pm is The Girls Room with DJ Lonesome (Jaclyn Arellano), DJ Filth (Mady Preece), DJ Duchamp’s Urinal (Carly Goldstein). In this political climate, it is finally time to take charge of our own bodies and image. No more housewife norms to determine what a woman should look like. Join us in conversation with the tools of music and noise to express what it means to be a woman. We will challenge the definitions and misconceptions about masculinity and femininity, creating a space where women can feel free to ask questions and get answers from other women.

    Listen: http://edg-ord-kxlu.streamguys1.com/klmu

  • Zeal Harris is known for contemporary, seductive, colorful, caricaturesque, political, urban-vernacular, story paintings. She is a Los Angeles based visual artist and has been in exhibitions in Port Au Prince at Haiti’s Ghetto Biennale; in New York at the Caribbean Culture Center of the African Diaspora; in Arizona at The Mesa Contemporary Arts Museum; and in Los Angeles at the California African-American Museum, The Makeshift Museum, 18th Street Arts Center, Launch LA, and EXSLA at The Brewery.  Zeal has an MFA in Studio Art from Otis College of Art & Design. She occasionally teaches, works on public art projects, and works with community arts organizations.

O-Tube

Alex Donis ‘94 MFA, Sri Lanka

Dec 16, 2013
Spotlight Category: Alumni
Although my sister and I hadn’t traveled together since 1996, when we trekked through Nepal and India, we had heard great things about Sri Lanka, and had always wanted to travel to this primarily Buddhist country. Ever since the 2004 tsunami devastated  much of this country’s coastal region, we knew we wanted to help out through some kind of volunteer work. This led us to contact the long-standing organization Volunteers for Peace that helped organize and place us with a local school near the town of Hatton.
 
After soaking up the sun on the powdery beaches of Unawatuna, and  leopard-spotting at Yala National Wildlife Reserve, we arrived in the heart of Sri Lanka’s hill country, known for its moun tainous terrain and manicured tea estates. Getting past several unanswered cell-phone calls and missed pick-up points, we arrived haphazardly at the town of Bogawantalawa. The K-12 government Tientsin Tamil School perches high above the tea plantations amidst low-flying clouds. My sister’s plan was to teach English, and I intended to teach drawing and painting.
 
The day we arrived, we met our team leader Victor, who enthusiastically greeted us with a warm embrace. He was originally  from the region but had moved to India as a boy. A group of South Korean high school and college students had arrived a week earlier to do various volunteer projects around the school. We met them in the principal’s office as they painted it a paler shade of lavender. We exchanged many a vanucam, which means hello and/or welcome in the Tamil language.
 
Later that evening, we hiked down the hill and met the local family hosts:  Kala, her husband, and their three beautiful daughters, along with grandma (whom I fell in love with) and the mischievous servant boy, Tambie. They were a gracious Tamil family who ran a local shop named ‘Sathiyas.’ Although the  accommodations weren’t exactly five-star, the early morning cold- bucket showers were warmed by Kala’s sweet smile, milk tea and delicious curries.
 
My first day of teaching was a bit of a shocker. To my surprise,  the students all stood when I entered the class and did not sit until I told them that they were allowed to do so. I’d like to try this on a particular group of Westside 9th-graders (ha!). At Crossroads School, where I teach in Santa Monica, I whine when I get 15 students in a class. Here, I faced 40 students, plus all the onlookers at the windows who wanted in on the class as soon as they saw me passing out watercolor sets. I began with my staple self-portrait lesson and had a sweet exchange with the students, translating facial parts and colors into the Tamil language. After the class was over, I was ushered to the science lab, past a group of Korean students who were doing a an outdoor mural featuring hand-holding  students in front of a globe with a ‘We love Sri Lanka banner.’ “Poor kids,” I mused. “Murals are such a pain.” 
 
I was introduced to the science teacher, a sweet lady in a bright yellow sari, and she asked me if I was a “professional artist.”  I assured her that I was, and thought to say, “Lady, please.I went to Otis!”  but I figured that wouldn’t get too far in these parts. She gestured toward the large wall at the back of the science lab,  and said she needed a mural that the students could learn from. “How ‘bout a Tamil Tiger and a Sri Lankan soldier doing a Bollywood dance together?” I thought. Probably not, Sri Lanka doesn’t need another civil war. After looking at  several science books, we agreed on the cycle of life of a tadpole turning into a frog, and the metamorphosis of a caterpillar becoming a butterfly. 
 
Never having done a mural, I pulled up my knickers, tied a pencil to a long stick and thought to myself, “What would Gronkdo?  Does Kent Twitchell ask for a contract? Would Judy Chicago hold out for a press release?” Time to leave my ego at the bottom of the hill and just do the work. Besides, there was a butterfly in the making and possibly a lotus. I’d try to make Roy (Dowell, Chair of Graduate Fine Arts) and Lari (Pittman, his partner)  proud.
 
Since the Korean students had used almost all the supplies for their mural, there was very little paint left. Also, the lacquer paint and the thinner had been left out in the rain, so I had to find kerosene  and diesel fuel in order to salvage the remaining supplies. They had forgotten to leave the brushes soaking overnight in paint thinner, so I had to use some of the preschool brushes that I had brought to donate.
 
I blocked in the mural using ground-up watercolor sets mixed with the white latex paint that was used to whitewash the classrooms. We soon got the supplies straightened out, and I was off and running, with many of the students poking their heads in through the windows, sharing smiles and helping out with a few brushstrokes. Later in the week, on their last day, the Korean students gave a performance, complete with music, dance and fashion show. The Tamil students also sang and performed traditional dances. My sister and I were honored with flowered wreathes and I was repeatedly called “the greatest artist ever.” Later that  evening, we all gathered in the science lab, and the Korean students passed out many bottles of ginseng sake. 
 
During our last few days, my sister helped me with the mural, and the school  brought in in a local temple painter named Desh, who was very patient. On our last day, I completed the giant butterfly that loomed over the pond. We returned to the science lab to share our last goodbyes, hear my sister sing a few Spanish songs to the faculty, and watch “the greatest artist ever” dedicate his first mural “To the Children of Tientsen Tamil School.”   
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