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Events
  • Rendering female models and celebrities on large-scale canvases and with quick, expressive brushstrokes, painter Katherine Bernhardt examines representations of beauty in mainstream media and fashion photography. She paints her subjects with severe, exaggerated features and emaciated limbs that sometimes morph into abstraction, recalling the works of Pablo Picasso. “Some people ask if I hate the models I paint,” she says. “I say no, I don't hate them.

  • UpCycle Day 2014!

    Sep 03| Special Event
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    Join us for the 3rd Annual UpCycle Day!

    Learn about the Resource Exchange

    Bring your excess supplies and materials to share and trade. 

    Stock up for the school year with Free supplies and materials. 

    Help divert our collective waste from ending up in landfills.

     

  • Jan Brandt

    Sep 04| Lectures
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  • Joel Kyack

    Sep 09| Lectures
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    JOEL KYACK Lives and works in Los Angeles.

    ghebaly.com/artists/joel-kyack

  • A dynamic portrait of the life of computer prodigy Aaron Swartz who championed free speech and data sharing, this must-see documentary premiered at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah and was the opening night film at the 2014 Hot Docs International Film Festival in Toronto, Canada. 

    We're excited the film’s director Brian Knappenberger will be our special guest speaker for the Q & A moderated by Movies that Matter series producers Judy Arthur and Perri Chasin after the screening. 

  • Koenraad Dedobbeleer lives and works in Brussels.

     

  • High&Low Bureau is a curatorial duo composed of Yael Messer and Gilad Reich. They curate exhibitions, film programs, performative events and publications, while engaging with a plethora of disciplines, media and modes of artistic expression.Their curatorial practice is dedicated to the exploration of artistic strategies that reflect on, and suggest alternatives to, specific social-political conditions.

O-Tube

Steve Roden

Steve RodenSteve RodenSteve Roden

 

Artist Steve Roden’s ('86) practice defies definition. In the U.S., he is known as a painter, but he morphs into a sound artist in Europe. “I like to think of myself as just a guy who makes stuff in my garage,” says Roden, whose work incorporates his myriad interests—from drawings made using stencils manufactured by Mattel to video works featuring Martha Graham’s ephemera.

At Otis, Roden's work moved from violent, figurative works to abstraction while working with visual artist Roy Dowell. The late artist Mike Kelley, an older punk rocker, was also in Roden’s orbit. The two continued to work together as Roden pursued graduate studies. Where others might have stifled Roden’s evolving style, Otis provided an environment that encouraged exploration. He cites his final drawing class project made with good friend and late conceptual artist Ray Navarro as an example. The duo made a video filled with “as many offensive, ridiculous things we could possibly think of.” The pair earned A’s. Perhaps Otis’s most lasting influence is Roden’s late-blooming love for reading, which he found during a class with novelist Bernard Cooper. “As a kid, I hated reading,” says Roden, “Now, everything I do comes from reading.”

Roden has performed his soundworks worldwide including Serpentine Gallery London, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, DCA Dundee Scotland, Redcat Los Angeles, Crawford Gallery Cork Ireland, as well as performance tours of Brazil and Japan. Recent performances include John Cage’s Cartridge Music with composer Mark Trayle at the Norton Simon Museum in Pasadena, and a tribute to Rolf Julius at the Hamburger Banhof Berlin. Since 1993, Roden has released numerous CDs under his own name as well as under the moniker “in be tween noise” on various record labels internationally. In July 2012, he performed a sound piece in the Rothko Chapel in collaboration with the Menil Collection, Texas.

Roden’s works are in the permanent collection of LACMA; MCA San Diego; MOCA, and National Museum of Contemporary Art, Athens, Greece.

(excerpted from an essay by Carren Jao)