Events
  • Viet Thanh Nguyen’s bestselling novel The Sympathizer won the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, the First Novel Prize from the Center for Fiction, and a Carnegie Medal from the American Library Association. It was also a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award and the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction. Nguyen is also the author of Race and Resistance: Literature and Politics in Asian America and Nothing Ever Dies: Vietnam and the Memory of War.

  • Joel Holmberg

    Sep 20| Lectures
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  • Tonya Foster

    Sep 21| Lectures
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    Poet Tonya Foster is the author of the collection A Swarm of Bees in High Court. Her work has appeared in nocturnes, Callaloo, Traffic, Gulf Coast, and other journals. Her essays have appeared in NY Arts Magazine, NYFA Quarterly and The Poetry Project Newsletter. A co-editor of Third Mind: Teaching Creative Writing Through Visual Art, Foster teaches at California College of the Arts and lives in the Bay Area.

  • Steven Ehrlich and Frederick Fisher will present their firms’ collaboration as EHRLICH | FISHER on Otis College’s new Goldsmith Campus Academic Building and Residence Hall. The campus-wide expansion and renovation project includes a new academic building, 300-seat Forum (the venue for this lecture), café and dining commons, Student Life Center, and residence hall.

     

  • Opening Reception

    Sep 24| Special Event
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    New York-based artist Polly Apfelbaum’s work has situated itself as a hybrid of painting, sculpture, and installation over a career spanning 30 plus years. Exploring the intricacies of color, Apfelbaum weaves her way, both literally and conceptually, through ideas of Minimalism, Pop aesthetics, and Color Field painting to blur the lines between two and three dimensional art making.

  • Artist Polly Apfelbaum in conversation with Connie Butler, within Apfelbaum's exhibition Face (Geometry) (Naked) Eyes.

     

O-Tube

Steve Roden

Steve RodenSteve RodenSteve Roden

 

Artist Steve Roden’s ('86) practice defies definition. In the U.S., he is known as a painter, but he morphs into a sound artist in Europe. “I like to think of myself as just a guy who makes stuff in my garage,” says Roden, whose work incorporates his myriad interests—from drawings made using stencils manufactured by Mattel to video works featuring Martha Graham’s ephemera.

At Otis, Roden's work moved from violent, figurative works to abstraction while working with visual artist Roy Dowell. The late artist Mike Kelley, an older punk rocker, was also in Roden’s orbit. The two continued to work together as Roden pursued graduate studies. Where others might have stifled Roden’s evolving style, Otis provided an environment that encouraged exploration. He cites his final drawing class project made with good friend and late conceptual artist Ray Navarro as an example. The duo made a video filled with “as many offensive, ridiculous things we could possibly think of.” The pair earned A’s. Perhaps Otis’s most lasting influence is Roden’s late-blooming love for reading, which he found during a class with novelist Bernard Cooper. “As a kid, I hated reading,” says Roden, “Now, everything I do comes from reading.”

Roden has performed his soundworks worldwide including Serpentine Gallery London, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, DCA Dundee Scotland, Redcat Los Angeles, Crawford Gallery Cork Ireland, as well as performance tours of Brazil and Japan. Recent performances include John Cage’s Cartridge Music with composer Mark Trayle at the Norton Simon Museum in Pasadena, and a tribute to Rolf Julius at the Hamburger Banhof Berlin. Since 1993, Roden has released numerous CDs under his own name as well as under the moniker “in be tween noise” on various record labels internationally. In July 2012, he performed a sound piece in the Rothko Chapel in collaboration with the Menil Collection, Texas.

Roden’s works are in the permanent collection of LACMA; MCA San Diego; MOCA, and National Museum of Contemporary Art, Athens, Greece.

(excerpted from an essay by Carren Jao)

 

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