Events
  • Creative Action and the Otis Community Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

     

    This week from 4:00 - 5:00 pm is Welcome to the Haunted Boulevard. Join DJ Platinum (Grace Potter) and DJ Batsy (Jessi Hita) for a journey of the folklores, urban legends, and paranormal encounters from different cultures. 

     

    Listen online at KLMU.

  • Creative Action and the Otis Community Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

     

  • Mexican artist Yoshua Okón’s videos blur the lines between documentary, reality, and fiction. He collaborates closely with his actors (often amateurs who are also the subjects of the work) to create sociological examinations that ask viewers to contemplate uncomfortable situations and circumstances.
  • Dana Johnson is the author of the short story collection In the Not Quite Dark. She is also the author of Break Any Woman Down, winner of the Flannery O’Connor Award for Short Fiction, and the novel Elsewhere, California.

  • Gallery 169 will be hosting the Otis College of Art and Design Communication Arts Graphic Design Junior Show, "5328," displaying a selection of work made over the five thousand twenty eight hours that make up the fall and spring semesters of the academic year. Work will include collected posters, publications, and typographic projects.
  • Clay, Body is a solo exhibition from artist Sydney Aubert: Unapologetically fat, crass, and sexual, a ceramics artist who also works in video, and whatever other materials arouse her in the moment. Exhibition will be on view from Monday, April 24 - Friday, April 28 at the Bolsky Gallery, Otis College of Art and Design. On view by appointment only, please contact the artist at sydney.aubert@gmail.com Reception: Thursday, April 27 | 6pm-9pm Bolsky Gallery, Otis College of Art and Design

  • Audrey Wollen is a feminist theorist and visual artist based in Los Angeles. Wollen uses social media, such as Twitter and Instagram, as platforms for her work on Sad Girl Theory, a theory which posits that internalized female sadness can be used as a radical and political action, separate from masculinized forms of protests such as anger and violence. She introduces this form of protest as an alternative to masculinized anger and violence.

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Wanda Weller

Wanda WellerWanda WellerWanda Weller

 

Patagonia’s design director for outdoor clothing, Wanda Weller (’88) believes that global approaches to recycling and renewable resources will effect significant change. The company’s commitment to sustainable design drives all of its products and activities, including awarding $20 million to more than 1,000 environmental grassroots organizations; working with outdoor companies to build a central fund that has saved more than 34 million acres of wild lands and waterways; encouraging businesses to donate at least 1% of their annual net revenues to environmental organizations worldwide; and recycling used Capilene for new polyester garments.

Weller followed her sister, who studied graphic design, to Otis. As she describes it, “Going to school with people of all ages and backgrounds was fantastic — people with more worldly experience influenced people like me who were just a year or so out of high school. That dynamic was invaluable for me.” She moved to the Pacific Northwest after graduation, where she spent ten years working in the athletic and outdoor apparel industry, at companies such as Adidas and ZIBA. Building on her experience at Otis, she gained a reputation as someone who could communicate with creative designers.

The complex technical and safety issues involved in outdoor clothing design demand meticulous, detail-oriented attention. In addition, Weller tracks trends in street wear, knowing that Patagonia customers seek comfort whether in the outdoors or in the city.

Weller has returned to Otis several times as a fashion design mentor, working with students to impart inspiration derived from limited choices in terms of plant-based dyes and renewable fabrics. Her message about “total beauty” is based on understanding the global impact of manufacturing, and evaluating design in terms of its impact on future generations.

 

Otis College Ranked 6th in Nation by The Economist