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Events
  • Marissa Johnen

     

    Current Setup

     
    Closing Reception: Friday, April 25, 6-9pm.
    Exhibition Runs: April 21 - 25
     
    Helen Bolsky Gallery
    Otis College of Art and Design
    9045 Lincoln Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90045
  • “Foregrounds” is a show exploring how we listen to sounds. It utilizes field recordings by blending songs and spoken word pieces with the soundscapes in which we listen to them – whether it be played along with Los Angeles traffic, the sound of a meal being prepared, or waves at the beach. Presented by DJ Derek (Corn), DJ Nasera (Alayon), DJ Max (Miles) of the Otis Radio class.

     

  • HOT & HE∆VY

    Apr 28| Special Event
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  • Tour I: Artists Studios

    May 03| Continuing Education
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    Fee: $75
    In conjunction with Freeway Studies #2: Inside the Quad

    Curators Meg Linton and Jeseca Dawson lead a tour of artists studios located "inside the quad." Tour includes transportation, lunch, and snacks.

  • student runway show

    May 03| Special Event
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    The annual Scholarship Benefit and Fashion Show at the Beverly Hilton Hotel is L.A.'s largest runway show. Featuring student designs created with mentors during the 2013-14 year, the show raises $1 million for student scholarships. Awardees this year include Leon Max, Michael Egeck, and Isabel and Ruben Toledo.

  • telefunk samples

    May 05| Special Event
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  •  

    Destress from a long day of classes with chill/relax music and little talk radio presented by DJ-Rice (Alan Chen), DJ-Tofu (Sam Wu), and Andre Style (Andrew Chung) of the Otis Radio class.

O-Tube

Curricular Connections

Ben Maltz Gallery Curricular Connections Tour


This information is designed to help Otis faculty members prepare their students for visits to the Ben Maltz Gallery. The reference material for each exhibition may vary but included are artists’ biographies and reviews of previous work; essay(s) by the curator(s); didactic material; checklist; and other background information that might be useful in the classroom. To schedule a tour of the exhibition for your group or class, you can do so online using the Tour Scheduling Form.
 

Guide for Current Exhibition

Freeway Studies #2: Inside the Quad  |  April 12 - July 27, 2014
 

Recent Curricular Guides

For all past guides see menu at left

Binding Desire: Unfolding Artists Books
January 25 - March 30, 2014

Freeway Studies #2: This Side of the 405
April 13 – June 1, 2013

Tapping the Third Realm
September 22 – December 8, 2013

Bridging Homeboy Industries
January 2 – March 23, 2013

Tips for class visits

Prior to coming to the gallery, review the materials and the information available on the Maltz Gallery’s exhibition page: images, press release, and often a short documentary style video tour.

If attending a scheduled tour with the curator or gallery staff member, take a stroll around the gallery for a first look to gather your impressions before the guided experience.

Ask students to prepare a question for the curator or tour guide prior to coming to the gallery to help create conversation, and to promote discussions.The gallery is for conversation not silence.

Please have students leave their bags in the gallery office while on the tour, and remind them that there is no food or drink allowed in the gallery.
 

Sample Assignments

A collection of helpful ideas for instructors who are designing gallery and exhibition related projects.
Sample Assignment 1

Tips for visiting an art gallery or museum on your own

Do research. See what information is available about the institution or specific exhibition prior to your visit.

Time it right. Check the gallery or museum hours before venturing out, and see if there are any public programs you might want to attend.

Keep an open mind. When you enter the gallery, take a look around the room at the work on your own first, before reading any of the didactic materials. Note your first impressions and then as you learn more about what you are looking at, reflect on how your impressions might change with more information. It’s important to understand the “who, what, where, why and how” of an artist’s intent and the context within which they are making work, but also important to allow for your own response to the work itself.

Ask questions. If you don’t understand what you are looking at or want more information, don’t hesitate to ask the people working at the gallery.

Stay in touch. If you like what you see at a gallery, sign up to be on the mailing list and go back again and again to learn more about their programming. Each venue has a different mission or focus.