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Events
  • Bauhaus Dances

    Feb 07| Screening
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    Bauhaus Dances, 1986 presented by Debra McCall
    Sunday, February 7, 4pm, Otis Forum, Free

  • Jillian Mayer is an artist and filmmaker living in South Florida. Her video works and performances have been premiered at galleries and museums internationally such as MoMA, MoCA:NoMi, BAM, Bass Museum, the Contemporary Museum of Montreal with the Montreal Biennial (2014) and film festivals such as Sundance, SXSW, and the New York Film Festival. She was recently featured in Art Papers, ArtNews and Art Forum discussing identity, Internet and her artistic practices and influences.
  • York Chang (b. 1973, St. Louis, MO) is an interdisciplinary artist who uses forensic and archival information systems as supports for poetic gestures and alternate histories, in order to interrogate the aesthetic conventions of authority which often serve to blur the line between fiction and reality. He earned both his BFA (1996) and Juris Doctorate (2001) from University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). York Chang lives and works in Los Angeles, CA, and is represented by Greene Exhibitions. 
     
  • Presidents' Day Holiday

    Feb 15| Academic Dates
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    Otis offices are closed for the Holiday.

  • Oliver Kellhammer is an independent artist, writer and researcher, who seeks, through his botanical interventions and social art practice, to demonstrate nature’s surprising ability to recover from damage. His recent work has focused on the psychosocial effects of climate change, cleaning up contaminated soils, reintroducing prehistoric trees to landscape damaged by industrial logging and cataloging the ecology of brownfield ecologies. He currently works as a lecturer in sustainable systems at Parsons in New York City.
     
  • In this performance I try to summarize In search of past time with my own words, as a story of another time which reveals itself contemporary. I deliver my own intimate and personal perception of this book which radiates in my life. Each performance is another opportunity to explore different zones of the book, proceeding at random, inspired by an aleatory and fickle memory. 
     
  • The Architecture/Landscape/Interiors Department at Otis College of Art and Design is pleased to announce the George H. Scanlon Foundation Lecture REDUX.4 by IÑAKI ÁBALOS

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Curricular Connections

Ben Maltz Gallery Curricular Connections Tour


This information is designed to help Otis Faculty & Students prepare for visits to the Ben Maltz Gallery. The reference material varies but includes artists’ biographies, reviews of previous work; essay(s) by the curator(s); didactic material; and exhibition checklist. To schedule a tour of the exhibition for your group or class, please use the online Tour Scheduling Form.

Tips for class visits

Prior to coming to the gallery, review the materials and the information available on the Maltz Gallery’s exhibition page: images, press release, and often a short documentary style video tour.

If attending a scheduled tour with the curator or gallery staff member, take a stroll around the gallery for a first look to gather your impressions before the guided experience.

Ask students to prepare a question for the curator or tour guide prior to coming to the gallery to help create conversation, and to promote discussions.The gallery is for conversation not silence.

Please have students leave their bags in the gallery office while on the tour, and remind them that there is no food or drink allowed in the gallery.
 

Sample Assignments

A collection of helpful ideas for instructors who are designing gallery and exhibition related projects.
Sample Assignment 1

Tips for visiting an art gallery or museum on your own

Do research. See what information is available about the institution or specific exhibition prior to your visit.

Time it right. Check the gallery or museum hours before venturing out, and see if there are any public programs you might want to attend.

Keep an open mind. When you enter the gallery, take a look around the room at the work on your own first, before reading any of the didactic materials. Note your first impressions and then as you learn more about what you are looking at, reflect on how your impressions might change with more information. It’s important to understand the “who, what, where, why and how” of an artist’s intent and the context within which they are making work, but also important to allow for your own response to the work itself.

Ask questions. If you don’t understand what you are looking at or want more information, don’t hesitate to ask the people working at the gallery.

Stay in touch. If you like what you see at a gallery, sign up to be on the mailing list and go back again and again to learn more about their programming. Each venue has a different mission or focus.

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