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    SCREENING AND CONVERSATION with Margaret Prescod, Founder, Black Coalition Fighting Back Serial Murders and host of “Sojourner Truth” on Pacifica Radio’s KPFK.
    Nana Gyamfi, Lawyer-Black Lives Matter, Black Coalition Fighting Back Serial Murders.

  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring Oliver Payne, a Los Angeles-based artist. Read more about him here.
    Contact: Soo Kim, skim@otis.edu
  • Kimberli Meyer trained as an architect and an artist, and has been the director of the MAK Center for Art and Architecture at the Schindler House in West Hollywood since 2002. She has initiated and curated many programs there, including the exhibitions How Many Billboards?

  • Industry Spotlight

    Oct 15| Special Event

    An advertising creative director for more than 25 years, Otis alumnus Josh Weltman was the Mad Men co-producer responsible for Don Draper's credibility as an advertising genius.

    Join us for a behind-the-scenes look at the hit series, plus hear key insights from Weltman's new book Seducing Strangers: How to Get People to Buy What You're Selling.

  • Please join the Digital Media Department for a lecture by  Alina Chau.
    Chau is an Animator, Illustrator and Storyboard artist who has worked with Lucasfilm Animation, Technicolor Interactive Services, and Electronic Arts.  
    Alina Chau received her MFA from the University of California, Los Angeles. She spent over a decade working in the animation industry. Her most notable credit is on LucasFilm’s Emmy Award Winning program, “Star Wars: The Clone Wars.”
  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring Yutaka Makino. He lives and works in Berlin.  Read more about him here.
    Contact: Soo Kim, skim@otis.edu
  • Susan Choi’s first novel, The Foreign Student, won the Asian-American Literary Award for fiction, and her second novel, American Woman, was a finalist for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize. Her most recent novel, A Person of Interest, was a finalist for the 2009 PEN/Faulkner Award. With David Remnick she co-edited the anthology Wonderful Town: New York Stories from The New Yorker. A recipient of fellowships from the NEA and the Guggenheim Foundation, and in 2010, the inaugural winner of the PEN/W.G. Sebald Award, Choi lives in Brooklyn.


Curricular Connections

Ben Maltz Gallery Curricular Connections Tour

This information is designed to help Otis faculty members prepare their students for visits to the Ben Maltz Gallery. The reference material for each exhibition may vary but included are artists’ biographies and reviews of previous work; essay(s) by the curator(s); didactic material; checklist; and other background information that might be useful in the classroom. To schedule a tour of the exhibition for your group or class, you can do so online using the Tour Scheduling Form.

Guide for Current Exhibition

Angie Bray: Shhhh |  January 17 - March 22, 2015

Tips for class visits

Prior to coming to the gallery, review the materials and the information available on the Maltz Gallery’s exhibition page: images, press release, and often a short documentary style video tour.

If attending a scheduled tour with the curator or gallery staff member, take a stroll around the gallery for a first look to gather your impressions before the guided experience.

Ask students to prepare a question for the curator or tour guide prior to coming to the gallery to help create conversation, and to promote discussions.The gallery is for conversation not silence.

Please have students leave their bags in the gallery office while on the tour, and remind them that there is no food or drink allowed in the gallery.

Sample Assignments

A collection of helpful ideas for instructors who are designing gallery and exhibition related projects.
Sample Assignment 1

Tips for visiting an art gallery or museum on your own

Do research. See what information is available about the institution or specific exhibition prior to your visit.

Time it right. Check the gallery or museum hours before venturing out, and see if there are any public programs you might want to attend.

Keep an open mind. When you enter the gallery, take a look around the room at the work on your own first, before reading any of the didactic materials. Note your first impressions and then as you learn more about what you are looking at, reflect on how your impressions might change with more information. It’s important to understand the “who, what, where, why and how” of an artist’s intent and the context within which they are making work, but also important to allow for your own response to the work itself.

Ask questions. If you don’t understand what you are looking at or want more information, don’t hesitate to ask the people working at the gallery.

Stay in touch. If you like what you see at a gallery, sign up to be on the mailing list and go back again and again to learn more about their programming. Each venue has a different mission or focus.