Otis College of Art and Design logo
Events
  • Otis Community Banquet

    Oct 22| Special Event
    More

    In conjunction with the exhibition Food - Water - Life / Lucy + Jorge Orta
    Wednesday, October 22 | Bobrow Green
    11:30am – 12:30pm: Banquet for participating classes
    12:30 – 1:15pm: Open to Otis Community to view class projects created for Banquet, and sample soup and fruit-infused water

  • Graduate Fine Arts, Visiting Artist Lecture Series presents artists Lucy + Jorge Orta.

    Thursday, October 23rd, 10am

    Graduate Studios: 10455 Jefferson Blvd Culver City CA 90230

  • Artists Lucy + Jorge Orta in conversation with the curators Ginger Gregg Duggan and Judith Hoos Fox of the traveling exhibition Food - Water - Life / Lucy + Jorge Orta. The conversation is followed by a reception. Food - Water - Life / Lucy + Jorge Orta is on view in the Ben Maltz Gallery through December 6, 2014.

  • JP Munro

    Oct 28| Lectures
    More

    Born 1975, Inglewood, CA. Lives and works in Los Angeles, CA.

    chinaartobjects.com/artists/jp-munro/

  • Minor Declaration

    Oct 29| Student Event
    More

    Highly Recommended for Sophomores

  • Rob Spillman

    Oct 29| Lectures
    More

    Rob Spillman is Editor and co-founder of Tin House, which has been honored in Best American Stories, Best American Essays, Best American Poetry, O’Henry Prize Stories, the Pushcart Prize Anthology and numerous other anthologies. He is also Executive Editor of Tin House Books and co-founder of the Tin House Literary Festival. His writing has appeared in BookForum, the Boston Review, Connoisseur, Details, GQ, Nerve, the New York Times Book Review, Rolling Stone, Salon, Spin, Sports Illustrated, Time, Vanity Fair, Vogue, and elsewhere.

  • Phillip Zach

    Oct 30| Lectures
    More

    Graduate Fine Arts, Visiting Artist Lecture Series presents artist, Phillip Zach.

    Thursday, October 30th 11:15am - 12:30pm

    Graduate Studios: 10455 Jefferson Blvd Culver City CA 90230

     

O-Tube

Sophomore English

Sophomore English
ENGL 202*
 

Students may select from a wide range of LAS English courses listed below:

 

Writing in the Digital Age Honors
ENGL107

This course examines modern and contemporary literature in the Digital Age and is thematically linked to AHCS 120 Honors Introduction to Visual.
A minimum grade of “C” (2.0) is required to pass ENGL107H only.

 

Creative Writing Workshop
LIBS 214/314

An introduction to the experience and practice of writing fiction and poetry. Most of the course takes place in a workshop setting, including visits by guest writers. Students produce a portfolio of writing done in the course of the semester in revised and publishable form.
Required for Creative Writing minors.
 

Gender Benders
LIBS214/314

Literary works can defy expectations, crossing and redefining genre boundaries. Explore the strange, hybrid forms that fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction can take. Write your own cross-genre pieces that surprise and delight, and participate in a genre-bending live performance.
 

Introduction to the Short Story
LIBS214/314

Includes reading and discussion of selected short stories emphasizing analysis, interpretation, and
evaluation. Focuses on the short story as a genre and as a source of significant insight into the human condition.
 

Coming of Age Story
LIBS214/314

Tumble down a rabbit-hole to Wonderland, joy ride a stolen hears with Maude, follow Harry into the
forbidden Deathly Hallows. Discover how the journey to adulthood captured in literature and film can reflect your own search for identity.
 

Playwrights and Performances
LIBS214/314

Theater is not dead. Explore storytelling through plays and performances. Read and research dramatic texts, learn how dramatists use language, and consider why performance is necessary. Write, design, and perform your own works; prove that theater is alive.
 

Film as Literature
LIBS214/314

Analyze narrative conventions in works of literary fiction and in film with attention to the similarities
and differences between literacy and film art. They learn to appreciate the literature devices
and styles evident in individual works and the commentary made by these works on moral,
social and aesthetic issues. Includes discussion of adaptation issues.
 

Interpretation of Fairy Tales
LIBS214/314

Fairy tale characters are archetypal images that are present at the deepest level of our psyches.
They have endured because they portray a vivid psychological reality through which we can gain
an understanding of ourselves. Analyzes selected fairy tales from many points of view.
 

African American Narratives
LIBS214/314

Because there is no one monolithic “African American community,” studies a broad sampling
of various narratives dealing with African American experiences. Some of the themes
explored deal with questions of identity and community, assimilation and nationalism,
interracial relations, classroom and artistic freedom.
 

Digital Storytelling
LIBS214/314

Technology and the age-old craft of storytelling intersect. This hands-on course explores the
art and craft of storytelling in new formats like the web, videos and other nonlinear media.
Will conceive, design and develop a fully functional multimedia story and learn about
writing, plot character development, interactivity and much more along the way.
 

Literature and Madness
LIBS214/314

Read poems, fiction, and nonfiction to study how mental illness is depicted in Literature.
Through works such as The Bell Jar, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest and Catcher in the
Rye, explore various identities, the creative process, and the representation of mental illness
in society and literature.

Harry Potter: Literary Tradition and Popular Culture
LIBS214/314

Examines the Harry Potter phenomenon in terms of its folkloric origins, literary structure, and its effect on popular culture. Critically analyze the various themes and values expressed through Rowling’s books in an effort to understand how and why Harry Potter has made reading fun again.
 

Text and Image
LIBS214/314

Examine a range of image-text relationships from alphabet formation to the text- based work of
contemporary visual artists. Addresses image-text relationships in photographic books, graphic novels, and the convergence of image-text on the big screen and electronic media.
 

Reel Docs: Truth through Film
LIBS214/314

Presents nonfiction cinema about real individuals and critical issues that shape our lives and the world in which we live. Focusing on documentaries as agents of social change, the class encourages dialogue and exchange, examining the stories, the processes and the creative possibilities available through the art of nonfiction filmmaking.
 

Creative Nonfiction
LIBS214/314

Explores different techniques, styles, structures and strategies of writing creative nonfiction, through the use of readings, exercises and practice. Enhance their writing skills using the tools presented, as well as observation and reflection.
 

Time Travel Narratives
LIBS214/314

This online course taught in Summer offers an adventurous journey into the multiple timeline
theories found in literature, film, anime and television. Explore a variety of temporal narratives and the significance and implications of time travel theories.
 

Original Young Adult Novels
LIBS214/314

Before Harry Potter, before Twilight, before the term “young adult” even existed, there were novels
written about the adolescent experience. Through readings, discussions, presentations and papers,
explore machinations of the teenager as presented in literature.
 

Brave New World: Shakespeare in Film and Literature
LIBS214/314

An overview of the literary mastery of William Shakespeare. This course introduces the elements
of literature and explores how they can provide a structure for better understanding and analyzing
literary and visual texts.