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  • Otis Books is pleased to publish Tim Erickson’s debut collection of poetry, Egopolis, a textual journey through destruction, resistance, city, and the Ego, from ancient times to the present day. Erickson’s work has appeared in the Chicago Review, Western Humanities Review, and the Salt Anthology of New Writing. He lives in Salt Lake City.

  • Otis Graduate Writing students will read from their works-in-progress.

  • Exquisite Beauty is the first retrospective and publication to document the eye-dazzling ceramics created by Ralph Bacerra (1938–2008), a Los Angeles–based artist known for his innovative approach to surface embellishment. Curated by Jo Lauria, the exhibition features more than ninety of the artist’s finest pieces—dramatic, highly decorated vessels and sculptures that have never before been the focus of a major exhibition or publication.

  • Opening Reception for Ralph Bacerra: Exquisite Beauty

  • David Treuer is an Ojibwe Indian from Leech Lake Reservation in northern Minnesota and currently teaches at USC. He is the author of the novels Little, The Hiawatha, The Translation of Dr. Apelles, named a Best Book of the Year by the Washington Post, as well as a critical work, Native American Fiction: A User's Manual. In 2012, he published another nonfiction work, Rez Life.

  • Angela Flournoy’s first novel The Turner House was a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection. Her fiction has appeared in The Paris Review, and she has written for The New Republic, The Los Angeles Review of Books and elsewhere. Flournoy has taught at the University of Iowa and Trinity Washington University. She lives in Los Angeles.

  • Susan Choi’s first novel, The Foreign Student, won the Asian-American Literary Award for fiction, and her second novel, American Woman, was a finalist for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize. Her most recent novel, A Person of Interest, was a finalist for the 2009 PEN/Faulkner Award. With David Remnick she co-edited the anthology Wonderful Town: New York Stories from The New Yorker. A recipient of fellowships from the NEA and the Guggenheim Foundation, and in 2010, the inaugural winner of the PEN/W.G. Sebald Award, Choi lives in Brooklyn.

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Lorenzo Hurtado Segovia ('07 MFA)

Jan 22, 2014
LA Times Review
Spotlight Category: Alumni

Art review: Faculty member Lorenzo Hurtado Segovia weaves a colorful landscape

Critic's Choice December 19, 2013 |By David Pagel

Last year, Lorenzo Hurtado Segovia exhibited a series of dazzling abstractions that he had made by shredding works on paper into long, skinny strips and then weaving the strips into place-mat-style paintings that simultaneously evoked digital transmissions on the fritz, plaid fabrics stretched by swinging hips and banners flapping in the wind.

This year, in a breakout exhibition at CB1 Gallery, Hurtado Segovia expands the range and intensifies the impact of his ingenious works. Making a mess of distinctions between painting and sculpture, not to mention art and craft, the L.A. artist who was born in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, invites visitors into a world where nothing sits still — least of all, your imagination.

The high-ceilinged main gallery is one part enchanted forest and one part holy chapel. Not one of its 21 works hangs on the wall, like a painting, or takes up much space, like a traditional sculpture. Yet you’re bathed in color. And you’ll want to walk around each piece, so as not to miss the golden glow that reflects off a huge woven work suspended in midair and the gorgeous rainbow of tertiary tints that leaps from the 18 freestanding dowels, some 12 feet tall, that Hurtado Segovia has wrapped in colorful cords ordinarily used to weave rugs.

A side gallery includes fewer pieces but no less drama. Three two-sided woven paper pieces, set atop elegant pedestals, revel in the pleasure, and the power, of asymmetry. On the back wall, a big painting similarly celebrates illogic, inconsistency, impossibility. Part interior, part landscape and part street scene, it takes its place in a sophisticated exhibition that makes room for life’s multilayered richness without taking up much space or wasting a minute.

CB1 Gallery, 207 W. 5th St., (213) 806-7889, through Jan. 26. Closed Mondays and Tuesdays. www.cb1gallery.com

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