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Events
  • Bauhaus Dances

    Feb 07| Screening
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    Bauhaus Dances, 1986 presented by Debra McCall
    Sunday, February 7, 4pm, Otis Forum, Free

  • Jillian Mayer is an artist and filmmaker living in South Florida. Her video works and performances have been premiered at galleries and museums internationally such as MoMA, MoCA:NoMi, BAM, Bass Museum, the Contemporary Museum of Montreal with the Montreal Biennial (2014) and film festivals such as Sundance, SXSW, and the New York Film Festival. She was recently featured in Art Papers, ArtNews and Art Forum discussing identity, Internet and her artistic practices and influences.
  • York Chang (b. 1973, St. Louis, MO) is an interdisciplinary artist who uses forensic and archival information systems as supports for poetic gestures and alternate histories, in order to interrogate the aesthetic conventions of authority which often serve to blur the line between fiction and reality. He earned both his BFA (1996) and Juris Doctorate (2001) from University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). York Chang lives and works in Los Angeles, CA, and is represented by Greene Exhibitions. 
     
  • Presidents' Day Holiday

    Feb 15| Academic Dates
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    Otis offices are closed for the Holiday.

  • Oliver Kellhammer is an independent artist, writer and researcher, who seeks, through his botanical interventions and social art practice, to demonstrate nature’s surprising ability to recover from damage. His recent work has focused on the psychosocial effects of climate change, cleaning up contaminated soils, reintroducing prehistoric trees to landscape damaged by industrial logging and cataloging the ecology of brownfield ecologies. He currently works as a lecturer in sustainable systems at Parsons in New York City.
     
  • In this performance I try to summarize In search of past time with my own words, as a story of another time which reveals itself contemporary. I deliver my own intimate and personal perception of this book which radiates in my life. Each performance is another opportunity to explore different zones of the book, proceeding at random, inspired by an aleatory and fickle memory. 
     
  • The Architecture/Landscape/Interiors Department at Otis College of Art and Design is pleased to announce the George H. Scanlon Foundation Lecture REDUX.4 by IÑAKI ÁBALOS

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Lorenzo Hurtado Segovia ('07 MFA)

Jan 22, 2014
LA Times Review
Spotlight Category: Alumni

Art review: Faculty member Lorenzo Hurtado Segovia weaves a colorful landscape

Critic's Choice December 19, 2013 |By David Pagel

Last year, Lorenzo Hurtado Segovia exhibited a series of dazzling abstractions that he had made by shredding works on paper into long, skinny strips and then weaving the strips into place-mat-style paintings that simultaneously evoked digital transmissions on the fritz, plaid fabrics stretched by swinging hips and banners flapping in the wind.

This year, in a breakout exhibition at CB1 Gallery, Hurtado Segovia expands the range and intensifies the impact of his ingenious works. Making a mess of distinctions between painting and sculpture, not to mention art and craft, the L.A. artist who was born in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, invites visitors into a world where nothing sits still — least of all, your imagination.

The high-ceilinged main gallery is one part enchanted forest and one part holy chapel. Not one of its 21 works hangs on the wall, like a painting, or takes up much space, like a traditional sculpture. Yet you’re bathed in color. And you’ll want to walk around each piece, so as not to miss the golden glow that reflects off a huge woven work suspended in midair and the gorgeous rainbow of tertiary tints that leaps from the 18 freestanding dowels, some 12 feet tall, that Hurtado Segovia has wrapped in colorful cords ordinarily used to weave rugs.

A side gallery includes fewer pieces but no less drama. Three two-sided woven paper pieces, set atop elegant pedestals, revel in the pleasure, and the power, of asymmetry. On the back wall, a big painting similarly celebrates illogic, inconsistency, impossibility. Part interior, part landscape and part street scene, it takes its place in a sophisticated exhibition that makes room for life’s multilayered richness without taking up much space or wasting a minute.

CB1 Gallery, 207 W. 5th St., (213) 806-7889, through Jan. 26. Closed Mondays and Tuesdays. www.cb1gallery.com

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