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Events
  • Otis Radio: Hot News

    May 02| Special Event
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    Creative Action and the Otis Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

     

    This week from 5:00 - 6:00 pm is Hot News with DJs Cindy Ho, Ana Molina, and April Oh who cover all the trending NEWS!

     
    Listen online at KLMU.

    All shows will be simulcast on 96.1FM in the Otis Cafe and archived on otisradio.tumblr.com

  • Otis Radio: flashback

    May 02| Special Event
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    Creative Action and the Otis Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

    This week from 5:00pm - 6:00pm is flashback: nostalgic static with DJ's Alix, April and Dane. Come listen and chat about nostalgic representations that make us who we are, from music, accessories, to fashion mistakes.


    Listen online at KLMU.

  • Graduate Fine Arts presents

    Now What?

    Class of 2016 Final MFA Exhibition  

     

    Family and Friends Night Celebration: Saturday, May 14, 6-9pm

    Ashton Allen

    Amanda Benefiel

    Ok-Young Choi

    Janet E. Dandridge

    Melany Dierks

    Elif Erkan

    Kathryn Kert Green

    Elizabeth Medina

    Kristin Moore 

    Jeisung Oh

    Zachary Roach

    Regine Rode

     

  • Learn about the Teacher Credentialing process with:

  • Otis Radio Olympics

    May 03| Special Event
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    Otis Radio students Bree Miller, Natasha Carovska and Rania Ann Zahir present Otis Radio Olympics.

    Play Games and Win Prizes!

    Come join them outside to relieve your stress from finals by playing Musical Chairs, Red Light Green Light, Simon Says, and other beloved childhood games.

  • For decades, the Los Angeles–based artist Lita Albuquerque has blurred distinctions between Land art and Light and Space on increasingly grander scales, whether it be building installations surrounding the pyramids in Egypt or placing sculptures across Antarctica to mirror the formation of the stars. Her cosmic explorations continue with two new bodies of work that are currently being shown at Kohn Gallery in Hollywood, from January 9 through February 27, 2016, and at USC’s Fisher Museum of Art, from January 26 through April 10, 2016.

  • Graduate Public Practice 
    2016 MFA Degree Presentations

    Henderson Blumer
    Jeanette Degollado
    Margarethe Drexel
    Tonya Ingram
    Jenny Kane
    Shefali Mistry
    Beth Ann Morrison
    Catherine SCOTI Scott
     

    EXHIBITIONS AND EVENTS:

     
    Friday May 6, 7:30 – 9:30 p.m.
    Tonya Ingram performance "LIVE: If Depression Is The Verse, Then Hope Is The Chorus"

O-Tube

Matt Lifson ('12 MFA) LA Times Review

Jan 21, 2014
LA Times Review
Spotlight Category: Alumni

(MFA '12 alumnus) Matt Lifson's paintings pregnant with possibilities at Angles Gallery

December 5, 2013 by Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times art critic

Five large paintings by Matt Lifson all show virtually the same enigmatic subject -- what appears to be a makeshift tent in the woods at night. But slight differences in tonality, lighting and paint-handling among the five generate unexpected responses.

Serial imagery, given its origins in Claude Monet's repeated studies of grain stacks and an imposing cathedral facade under different conditions of light and weather, tends to have a rather sunnier disposition than what turns up in Lifson's solo debut at Angles Gallery. Grim, even inexplicably creepy, his blue-black “Tent” paintings get you to scrutinize them like a detective at a crime scene.

As a cop would do, you try to create a narrative from pictorial fragments. Is that romantic moonlight illuminating the tent or a police helicopter's piercing searchlight?  Does the tent belong to a vacationing camper or, given what appears to be its improvised nature, a homeless person? Is it shelter from an impending storm?

What's that jagged, sharp-edged but indecipherable whitish object just beneath the fallen tree limb? And speaking of the limb, why do its branches appear to have been stripped?

Going from canvas to canvas (each is around 6 feet by 7 feet), distinctions that at first seem slight steadily grow more stark -- and inexplicably ominous. Spots of white light in the deep, dark indigo woods could be anything from fireflies to nocturnal stalkers. Subtitled with fragmentary musical phrases -- “Sleep in heavenly...” “Lay down my bones with the rocks and roots...,” etc. -- the bleak paintings firmly resist disclosure.

That's their strength: Lifson underscores the degree to which, encountering a picture, we project meanings onto it. These paintings are pregnant with possibilities, horrific or benign, which shift in and out of view across a wide range of emotional registers depending on a viewer's drifting thoughts. In today's picture-saturated world, no wonder things seem so daunting.

The show also includes a floor sculpture composed of 217 gilded bricks, each stamped with a cryptic symbol and laid out in a curve, plus three small folding tables with a depiction of a black jacket painted on peeling paper across each top. More compelling is a wall text in clear, nearly invisible vinyl, its Hebraic font style readable only as fleeting light falls across it. A description of a demon lurks in the text -- if not on the wall, then surely in your head.

 

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