Otis College of Art and Design logo
  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring John Houck, a Los Angeles-based artist. Read more about him here.
    Contact: Soo Kim, skim@otis.edu
  • Jesse Benson (b. 1978) is an artist based in Los Angeles. Benson's complex practice is driven by the perversion of roles and representation that characterize his generational moment. In obsessively "skillful" objects like the Bureau Paintings, Catalog Page Paintings, Future Sculptures, and Repaintings, Benson constantly questions the authenticity of the document, the function of style, and the value of both art and artist. Benson is equally committed to a curatorial/organizational practice that openly overlaps and inspires his object production.

  • The Architecture/Landscape/Interiors Department at OTIS College of Art and Design is pleased to announce a lecture by Nick SeierupPrincipal | Design Director of Perkins+Will, Los Angeles, on Thursday, December 3, 2015.


  • Marisa Silver is the author most recently of the New York Times bestselling novel Mary Coin. Her other books include the novels No Direction Home and The God of War (a finalist for a Los Angeles Times Book Prize), as well as two story collections, Babe in Paradise and Alone with You. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker and been included in many anthologies, including The Best American Short Stories and The O. Henry Prize Stories. Silver lives in Los Angeles.

  • Jesse Lerner is a filmmaker based in Los Angeles.  His short films Natives (1991, with Scott Sterling), T.S.H. (2004) and Magnavoz (2006) and the feature-length experimental documentaries Frontierland/Fronterilandia (1995, with Rubén Ortiz-Torres), Ruins (1999) The American Egypt (2001), Atomic Sublime (2010) and The Absent Stone (2013, with Sandra Rozental) have won numerous prizes at film festivals in the United States, Latin America and Japan.

  • Otis faculty member Dana Berman Duff will present a program of short 16mm and digital films in her "Catalogue" series.

  • Performing the Grid is an exhibition that brings together an intergenerational group of artists and cultural producers that utilize the grid as a performative strategy to examine, challenge and position philosophical, political, social, domestic, corporeal, and mythical perspectives. Rosalind Kraus famously wrote that the grid “functions to declare the modernity of modern art” in her 1979 essay, Grids.


Guy Bennett: 2006-07 Faculty Development Grant Report


I was awarded a faculty development grant in spring 2007 in order to work on the exhibit Beyond the Iconic: Contemporary Photographs of Paris, which I curated with Béatrice Mousli and which was presented in the Getty Gallery of the Los Angeles Public Library from March 1–June 1, 2008. (The show was reviewed in the Los Angeles Downtown News and the Los Angeles Times, among other publications.) The exhibit was one of an on-going series of projects focusing on franco-american literary exchanges and cross-cultural perceptions more generally speaking, the goal in this case being to re-examine the “iconic” status of the French capital, and consider to the degree to which its romanticized image actually reflects its current urban reality. The exhibit was the counterpart of “Los Angeles, un autre regard sur une ville autre,” a colloquium we had organized the preceding year at the Bibliothèque nationale de France in Paris on the issue of the representation and perception of Los Angeles.

Grant moneys were used to pay for travel to and inside Paris, for research materials in the form of books and reviews, and for meals when out working. Curatorial work was done in the photographic collections of the Musée Carnavalet, which graciously provided the photographs for the exhibit. Supplemental research was carried out in the library of the Maison européenne de la photographie, which contained books and catalogs featuring several of the photographers included in the exhibit. In some cases we were able to meet and speak with the photographers themselves, which proved to be invaluable in understanding their working methods and materials, which were referenced in the panel texts and annotations of the exhibit, and discussed at length in the accompanying catalog, Beyond the Iconic: Contemporary Photographs of Paris, 1970–2003 (Los Angeles: Angel City Press, 2008), which I also wrote, designed, and typeset.

I am grateful to have received a grant in order to pursue this project, and thank the Faculty Development Committee for their consideration, and the college itself for supporting faculty projects.

--Guy Bennett
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Graduate Writing

Beyond the Iconic

Beyond the Iconic cover