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  • Rendering female models and celebrities on large-scale canvases and with quick, expressive brushstrokes, painter Katherine Bernhardt examines representations of beauty in mainstream media and fashion photography. She paints her subjects with severe, exaggerated features and emaciated limbs that sometimes morph into abstraction, recalling the works of Pablo Picasso. “Some people ask if I hate the models I paint,” she says. “I say no, I don't hate them.

  • UpCycle Day 2014!

    Sep 03| Special Event
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    Join us for the 3rd Annual UpCycle Day!

    Learn about the Resource Exchange

    Bring your excess supplies and materials to share and trade. 

    Stock up for the school year with Free supplies and materials. 

    Help divert our collective waste from ending up in landfills.

     

  • Forrest Gander

    Sep 03| Lectures
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    Otis Books/Seismicity Editions is pleased to publish Panic Cure: Poetry from Spain for the 21st Century, an anthology of poems from eleven contemporary Spanish poets, active from the 1960s through the present. Selected and translated by Forrest Gander, Panic Cure is notable for its impressive range of poetic voices.

  • Jan Brandt

    Sep 04| Lectures
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  • Joel Kyack

    Sep 09| Lectures
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    JOEL KYACK Lives and works in Los Angeles.

    ghebaly.com/artists/joel-kyack

  • A dynamic portrait of the life of computer prodigy Aaron Swartz who championed free speech and data sharing, this must-see documentary premiered at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah and was the opening night film at the 2014 Hot Docs International Film Festival in Toronto, Canada. 

    We're excited the film’s director Brian Knappenberger will be our special guest speaker for the Q & A moderated by Movies that Matter series producers Judy Arthur and Perri Chasin after the screening. 

  • Koenraad Dedobbeleer lives and works in Brussels.

     

O-Tube

Eric Rodriguez ('12)

May 6, 2013
Alumni Profile - Illustration
Spotlight Category: Student

What was your most fun/influential class?
“Illustrated Book” really made me focus on why I liked certain ideas, and why I made certain choices. It taught me to get to the heart of a project and be consistent with that concept. I definitely did some of my most unhindered and honest work.

What is your hometown? I grew up in Visalia, California.

What originally attracted you to Otis?
I expected to be held to a very high standard, and knew that demanding a lot from myself was the best way for me to progress.

How did you decide on your major?
I’ve loved comics since childhood. As I matured and started to realize the full potential of comics as an artistic medium, I knew they were what I wanted to focus on in my career. In Foundation Year, I was fairly certain that I wanted to go into Illustration because I felt that it was the best major to teach me what I needed.

Cool things you did outside of school?
JT Steiny (’84) organized several group book shows at Meltdown Comics in West Hollywood. He invested his own time and effort into it for the sake of the students. They were always a lot of fun. Sometimes we got together on the weekends and played soccer on the Otis lawn.

How did Otis affect your work/life?
I developed a strong work ethic and drive to succeed. Admittedly, I feel that I traded some important aspects of my life for four years away from people I cared about. My life changed in ways I never expected.

Something unusual/idiosyncratic?
I have a whole list of normal things that I’ve never done, like go camping or ride on a boat or attend a concert.

What would you tell new students?
Be prepared to work hard. You’ll probably have friends who attend large universities, join clubs and intramural sports teams, go for bike rides and road trips, throw parties, and go out on dates. You will not do any of these things, or, at least not very often. Your priorities will swiftly shift to a choice between eating, sleeping, or working. You’ll usually choose the latter. If you take it seriously, it will feel more like going to work than going to school, and by the end you’ll be glad it did.

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