Events
  • Margo Victor

    Sep 29| Lectures
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    Margo Victor lives and works in Los Angeles, California and received her BFA at the California Institute of the Arts. Her work has been exhibited at Kunstlerhaus Stuttgart and Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam; Happy Lion in Chinatown, Los Angeles, California; Cirrus Gallery in Los Angeles; Elizabeth Dee Gallery in New York.

  • Shila Khatami

    Oct 04| Lectures
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    Shila Khatami has had solo exhibitions at:
    Autocenter in Berlin, Kunstverein Dillingen, 
    Galerie Samy Abraham in Paris, 
    Galerie Susanna Kulli in Zurich, 
    Clages in Cologne and Treize in Paris.
    Group exhibitions include:
    “00ooOO - holes, dots, balls“ with Davide Bertocchi at Hopstreet, Brussels ; 
    “Punkt-Systeme,Vom Pointilismus zum Pixel“ at the Wilhelm Hack Museum, Ludwigshafen; 
    „BYOB“ at Palais de Tokyo, Paris; 
    “Dorothea“ at Ancient & Modern, London; 
    “Ambigu“ at Kunstmuseum St. Gallen.

  • John Keene

    Oct 05| Lectures
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    John Keene is the author of the novels Annotations and Counternarratives, as well as several other works, including the poetry collection Seismosis, with artist Christopher Stackhouse, and a translation of Brazilian author Hilda Hilst's novel Letters from a Seducer. The recipient of a Whiting Award, Keene has been a member of the Dark Room Writers Collective and a Cave Canem fellow. He has served as the managing editor of Callaloo and taught at Northwestern. He currently teaches at Rutgers University-Newark and lives in New York.

  • Leonardo Bravo is an artist, curator, and educator and the Founder of Big City Forum. Big City Forum is an interdisciplinary project designed to explore the intersection between design-based creative disciplines (Design, Architecture, Urban Planning, etc) that take into account public space and the built environment. Big City Forum facilitates the exchange of ideas through gatherings, symposiums, exhibitions, and special events that promote forward-thinking projects and the individuals at the forefront of this vision.

  • Chris Coy

    Oct 11| Lectures
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    Chris Coy is an artist and filmmaker. His work has shown at the New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York, the Sundance Film Festival, the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, the Netherlands Media Art Institute, and numerous international art festivals and exhibitions. He received his MFA from the University of Southern California in 2012. He is represented by Anat Ebgi, Los Angeles.

  • Professor Karen Tongson joined the USC faculty in English and Gender Studies in fall 2005. She received her Ph.D. in English from the University of California, Berkeley. Before coming to USC, Tongson held a University of California President's Postdoctoral Fellowship in Literature at UC San Diego, and a UC Humanities Research Institute (UCHRI) Residential Research Fellowship at UC Irvine.

  • Artist Polly Apfelbaum in conversation with David Pagel, within Apfelbaum's exhibition Face (Geometry) (Naked) Eyes.

     

O-Tube

International Student Housing Options

 

On-Campus Housing

http://www.otis.edu/housing-residence-life/housing-details

 

Off-Campus Housing

There are four types of off-campus housing you can get:

Studio

A studio consists of a living/sleeping area, a bathroom and a cooking area.  Junior 1 bedroom apartments are larger with a semi-private bedroom or a den. Bachelor studios/units are small studios with a kitchenette: a mini fridge, a microwave, no oven. Average price for a studio is $700-1200. Back units are converted studios/apartments located in the back of the house’s property.

Apartment

An apartment has bedrooms, bathrooms, a living room and a kitchen. Apartment homes/luxury apartments have extra storage space and washer/dryer hookup or in-unit. Average price for a 1br apartment is $1100 - $2300, and $2000 - $3000 for a 2 br apartment.

House

A house has bedrooms, bathrooms, a living room, a kitchen, a dining room and a garage. The landlord may rent out the whole house or only bedrooms. Average price for a house is $2300-4000.

Homestay

This option offers the international student the opportunity to live with an American family.  The student can learn firsthand what family life in the United States is like.  Homestay is a great way to make friends and improve English skills.  Some homestays are within walking distance of the campus; others are within an easy public bus ride of Otis.  Every homestay is different - some families have children and others do not, some families provide the student with a room and home-cooked meals, and others provide the room only.

Homestay Providers

www.global-student-service.com/homestayforstudents.html

 

Resources

  • www.craigslist.org – a general classifieds website that has housing listings and  where you can also buy used furniture
  • http://www.otis.edu/classified-ads - Otis classifieds with listing from other students
  • www.uloop.com – a classifieds website specifically for students
  • www.chineseinla.com – a website for Chinese people in Los Angeles that has a housing section
  • www.radiokorea.com - a website for Korean people in Los Angeles that has a housing section
  • Bulletin boards around campus
  • Local newspapers at newsstands, bookstores, local & international markets

 

Apartments in the area around Otis:

http://www.otis.edu/housing-residence-life/living-campus

 

Vocabulary:

Landlord: the person who owns and/or rents you the property.

Tenant: you, the person who stays and uses the property.

Rent: what you pay to live in a property.

Lease: your agreement with the landlord. If you rent from the renter, it’s called a sublease.

Deposit: upfront payment that you get back when you move out unless you damage the property.

Penalty fees: what you pay if you do not follow the rules on the lease.

Credit history: when you own credit cards and borrow money in the U.S, you have a credit history.

Social Security Number: a number ID given to U.S. citizen, residents and temporary workers.

Normal wear & tear: what things look like after being used, but not damaged. You will pay a fee and/or lose your deposit if any rented property/item is damaged beyond normal wear & tear. So take pictures of everything before you move in!

 

Landlord Problems to Avoid:

  • Ask you for money before meeting you.
  • Currently away from home and cannot meet you face to face.
  • Want you to pay over the phone, send it by mail, email, or wire.
  • Get upset because you ask for an ID or a signed receipt.
  • Do not call you back.
  • Let you wait and do not apologize.
  • Change the price at the last minute.

When this happens, walk away!

Note: Ask your landlord to waive (not charge) the application fee because you don’t have a social security number or a credit history!

 

When looking at apartments:

  • Don’t give out your bank account number or important information over email or phone.
  • Meet your landlord/roommate and see the place in person. Take a friend with you.
  • Call 20 minutes ahead to confirm your visit/appointment.
  • Ask questions:
    • What is included in the rent?
    • Are guests allowed?
    • Who else lives there or has a key?
    • Check everything: sink, toilet, hot water, lights, air conditioner/heater, etc.
    • Take pictures of the room AND any damages.
    • Type/write down everything AND sign. Make a lease. Always.
    • You cannot change your mind after you sign.
    • Don’t give anyone your money without a signed lease, a key and a receipt.
    • Ask for help, smile and say thank you!

 

Documents you will need to rent:

  • Original passport AND copy of passport
  • Original I-20 AND copy of I-20
  • A copy of your I-94
  • Copy of your financial statement or a bank account verification letter.
  • Reference letter from a friend, relative, teacher, etc. You can pick up a housing letter from the housing office.
  • (optional) A co-signer in the U.S.
  • You might need to open a U.S. bank account in order to rent
  • About $2500 to cover the first month of rent and a deposit

 

How to read and write a U.S. address:

Line 1: house number + street name

Line 2: apartment/suite/office number

Line 3: City, State Zipcode

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Otis College Ranked 6th in Nation by The Economist