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  • York Chang (b. 1973, St. Louis, MO) is an interdisciplinary artist who uses forensic and archival information systems as supports for poetic gestures and alternate histories, in order to interrogate the aesthetic conventions of authority which often serve to blur the line between fiction and reality. He earned both his BFA (1996) and Juris Doctorate (2001) from University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). York Chang lives and works in Los Angeles, CA, and is represented by Greene Exhibitions. 
     
  • Presidents' Day Holiday

    Feb 15| Academic Dates
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    Otis offices are closed for the Holiday.

  • Oliver Kellhammer is an independent artist, writer and researcher, who seeks, through his botanical interventions and social art practice, to demonstrate nature’s surprising ability to recover from damage. His recent work has focused on the psychosocial effects of climate change, cleaning up contaminated soils, reintroducing prehistoric trees to landscape damaged by industrial logging and cataloging the ecology of brownfield ecologies. He currently works as a lecturer in sustainable systems at Parsons in New York City.
     
  • Emily Kendal Frey is the author of the poetry collections The Grief Performance, selected for the Cleveland State Poetry Center's 2010 First Book Prize by Rae Armantrout, and Sorrow Arrow, as well as the the chapbooks Frances, The New Planet, and Airport. The winner of the Poetry Society of America's Norma Farber First Book Award, Frey's poetry has appeared in the journals Octopus and the Oregonian. She lives in Portland.

    Seating is limited.

    Maps & Parking Information

  • In this performance I try to summarize In search of past time with my own words, as a story of another time which reveals itself contemporary. I deliver my own intimate and personal perception of this book which radiates in my life. Each performance is another opportunity to explore different zones of the book, proceeding at random, inspired by an aleatory and fickle memory. 
     
  • Rear Window

    Kristin Moore
    Thesis Exhibition
    Feb 16th-19th, 2016

    Reception:

    Thursday, Feb 18th, 6-9PM

    Bolsky Gallery
    Otis College of Art and Design
    9045 Lincoln Blvd. 
    Los Angeles, CA 90045 
    310.846.2614


    Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat-Sun 12pm-4pm

     

  • The Architecture/Landscape/Interiors Department at Otis College of Art and Design is pleased to announce the George H. Scanlon Foundation Lecture REDUX.4 by IÑAKI ÁBALOS

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Visa Interview Tips

Scheduling your F-1 Visa Interview:

  • Your SEVIS ID Number = located above barcode strip on Page 1 of your SEVIS I-20 (under Attached Documents box)
  • {Your institution's abbreviation} school code: {Your institution's school code}
  • Submit required SEVIS I-901 Fee at: www.fmjfee.com

                         *Note: if you are citizen of Canada you can skip the remaining steps as you are not required to obtain a F-1 visa.

When applying for your F-1 student visa, it is important to remember that F-1 is a non-immigrant visa type. Visa interviews usually last only 1-3 minutes and the visa official is looking for you to convince him/her that you do not plan to immigrate to the U.S. and do plan to return to your home country after completing your degree at {Your institution's abbreviation}.

Tips for Visa Interview Questions:

1. TIES TO HOME COUNTRY
Under U.S. law, all applicants for non-immigrant visas are viewed as intending immigrants until they can convince the consular officer that they are not. Thus, you must be able to show that you have reasons for returning to your country that are stronger than those for remaining in the United States. "Ties" to your home country include the following: family, job, financial assets that you own or will inherit, investments etc.  The interviewing officer may ask about your plans for future employment, family or other relationships, educational objectives, and long-term plans in general in your home country. Each person's situation is different and there is no guarantee of visa approval.

2. ENGLISH ABILITY
Anticipate that the interview will be conducted in English and not in your native language. One suggestion is to practice English conversation with a native speaker before the interview. If you are coming to the United States solely to study intensive English (IELP), be prepared to explain how English will be useful for you in your home country.

3. SPEAK FOR YOURSELF
Do not bring parents or family members with you to the interview; the consular officer wants to interview you, not your family. A negative impression is created if you are not prepared to speak on your own behalf.

4. KNOW YOUR ACADEMIC PROGRAM AND HOW IT FITS YOUR CAREER PLANS
If you are not able to articulate the reasons you will study in a particular {Your institution's abbreviation} program, you may not succeed in convincing the consular officer that you are indeed planning to study, rather than to immigrate to the U.S. You should also be able to explain how studying in the U.S. relates to you future professional career when you return home.

5. BE CONCISE
Because of the volume of applications received, all consular officers are under considerable time pressure to conduct a quick and efficient interview. They must often make a decision, on the impressions they form during the first minute or two of the interview. Consequently, what you say first and the initial impression you create are critical to your success. Keep your answers to the officer's questions short and to the point.

6. SUPPLEMENTAL DOCUMENTATION
It should be clear at a glance to the consular officer what written documents you are presenting and what they signify. Lengthy written explanations cannot be quickly read or evaluated. Remember that you will have 2-3 minutes of interview time, if you're lucky, and all documents should be official or certified originals.

7. NOT ALL COUNTRIES ARE EQUAL
Applicants from countries suffering economic problems or from countries where many people have stayed in the United States as immigrants will have more difficulty getting visas. Statistically, applicants from those countries are more likely to be asked about job opportunities at home after their study in the United States. Additional documentation or processing time may be required.

8. EMPLOYMENT
Your main purpose of coming to the United States should be to study, not for the chance to work before or after graduation. While many students do work off-campus during their studies, such employment is secondary to their main purpose of completing their education. You must be able to clearly articulate your plan to return home at the end of your program. If your spouse is applying for an accompanying F-2 visa, be aware that F-2 dependents cannot, under any circumstances, be employed in the U.S.  If asked, be prepared to address what your spouse intends to do with his or her time while in the U.S. Volunteer work and attending school part-time are permitted activities.

9. DEPENDENTS REMAINING AT HOME
If your spouse and/or children are remaining in your home country, be prepared to address how they will support themselves in your absence. This can be an especially tricky area if you are the primary source of income for your family. If the consular general officer gains the impression that your family members will need you to send money from the U.S. in order to support them, your F-1 student visa application will almost certainly be denied. If your family does decide to join you at a later time, it is helpful to have them apply at the same post where you applied for your visa.

10. MAINTAIN A POSITIVE ATTITUDE
Do not engage the consular officer in an argument. If you are denied a student visa, ask the officer for a list of documents he/she would suggest you bring in order to overcome the refusal, and try to get the reason you were denied in writing.

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