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Events
  • Otis Books is pleased to publish Tim Erickson’s debut collection of poetry, Egopolis, a textual journey through destruction, resistance, city, and the Ego, from ancient times to the present day. Erickson’s work has appeared in the Chicago Review, Western Humanities Review, and the Salt Anthology of New Writing. He lives in Salt Lake City.

  • Otis Graduate Writing students will read from their works-in-progress.

  • Exquisite Beauty is the first retrospective and publication to document the eye-dazzling ceramics created by Ralph Bacerra (1938–2008), a Los Angeles–based artist known for his innovative approach to surface embellishment. Curated by Jo Lauria, the exhibition features more than ninety of the artist’s finest pieces—dramatic, highly decorated vessels and sculptures that have never before been the focus of a major exhibition or publication.

  • David Treuer is an Ojibwe Indian from Leech Lake Reservation in northern Minnesota and currently teaches at USC. He is the author of the novels Little, The Hiawatha, The Translation of Dr. Apelles, named a Best Book of the Year by the Washington Post, as well as a critical work, Native American Fiction: A User's Manual. In 2012, he published another nonfiction work, Rez Life.

  • Angela Flournoy’s first novel The Turner House was a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection. Her fiction has appeared in The Paris Review, and she has written for The New Republic, The Los Angeles Review of Books and elsewhere. Flournoy has taught at the University of Iowa and Trinity Washington University. She lives in Los Angeles.

  • Susan Choi’s first novel, The Foreign Student, won the Asian-American Literary Award for fiction, and her second novel, American Woman, was a finalist for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize. Her most recent novel, A Person of Interest, was a finalist for the 2009 PEN/Faulkner Award. With David Remnick she co-edited the anthology Wonderful Town: New York Stories from The New Yorker. A recipient of fellowships from the NEA and the Guggenheim Foundation, and in 2010, the inaugural winner of the PEN/W.G. Sebald Award, Choi lives in Brooklyn.

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What is it?

The LAS capstone course offers you a unique opportunity to reflect on your education, artistic practices and/or interests. Through discussion and reflection, you will identify, articulate, research, write about, and discuss specific issues and concerns that you believe are the most critical in understanding and evaluating an engaging issue and its dynamic relationship to you
as an artist and designer.

The capstone is a blended class which means that about 30% of the course will be communicated online.  Some weeks you will meet as a class, some weeks you will meet individually with your instructor, and some weeks will you will work independently posting work online instead of going to class or having meetings.  You will work closely with your instructor discussing and reviewing all posted work to help you revise and be successful.

 

What will be expected of you?

You will be researching and writing a paper that is approximately 12-15 pages or 3750 words, post this paper, along with a cover letter, a bibliography, and an annotated bibliography on your eportfolio, and will present this work to your class.  You will have much support from your instructor, the library staff, the SRC, and your peers.

 

Why should you want to do this?

Your ability to critically think, to research, to utilize visual literacy, to analyze, to demonstrate mastery of a particular topic, to write in an articulate manner, and to skillfully present your work to an audience are all demonstrated through your capstone experience.  In other words, this class and what you produce “caps” or completes your Liberal Studies and Otis experience.

 

What can I do over the summer?

Write down a list of topics you are interested in researching.  You will be asked to bring this list with you the first day of class in the fall.  Should you wish to get a head-start on your semester, you should choose a topic, email a LAS instructor from the list below for commentary, work with that instructor to write and revise a thesis statement (perspective or argument for your paper), and do some research using the Otis Databases (linked through our library page).    There will be a pathfinder or link on the Otis library page available before summer break which will take you to an eportfolio which has some helpful advice and useful links.

 

Who can I contact?

The following are professors in the Liberal Arts and Sciences Dept.  Their specialties are listed although they all have other interests and expertise.  Feel free to email them this semester or over the summer with questions.

 

Parme Giuntini, Art History
pgiuntini@otis.edu
 

Heather Joseph-Witham, Folklore and Mythology
hwitham@otis.edu
 

Jeanne Willette, Art History and Critical Theory
willette@otis.edu
 

David Bremer, Literature and Theology
dbremer@otis.edu