Events
  • Sitting in Sound

    Jul 15| Special Event
    More

    Image: Electronic Sound Bath
     

  • L: Nora Jane Slade, Kate Mouse Mickey Moss, 2014, Photo transfer and fabric paint on sweatshirt, cardboard and found objects. R: Marisa Takal, I Love My Sister, 2016, Oil on canvas, 65 x 50 inches.

    Opening Reception: I Wish I Was a Telephone: Nora Jane Slade and Marisa Takal

    Celebrate the opening of the two-person exhibition of work by Los Angeles-based artists Nora Jane Slade and Marisa Takal.

    Light snacks and refreshments.

    Exhibition on view July 15 - August 19, 2017.

  • Amelia Gray is the author of the short story collections AM/PM, Museum of the Weird, and Gutshot, as well as the novels Threats and, most recently, Isadora, published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. Her fiction and essays have appeared in The New Yorker, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Tin House, and VICE. She is winner of the New York Public Library Young Lions Award, of FC2's Ronald Sukenick Innovative Fiction Prize, and a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award. 

  • Image: BijaRi, On the rooftops of Santa Domingo-Savio neighborhood as part of the project Contando con Nosotros, 2011

    Opening Reception 3-5pm /  Curator and Artist led walk-thru of the exhibition, 3pm  /  Free

  • Talking to Action

    Sep 17| Exhibition
    More

    Image: Eduardo Molinari, Confluencia 2: Los Angeles River, 2016.

  • Luis J. Rodriguez was Los Angeles Poet Laureate from 2014-2016. The twenty-fifth edition of his first book, Poems Across the Pavement, won a 2015 Paterson Award for Sustained Literary Achievement. He has written fourteen other books of poetry, children’s literature, fiction, and nonfiction, including the best-selling memoir Always Running: La Vida Loca: Gang Days in L.A. Rodriguez is also founding editor of Tia Chucha Press and co-founder of Tia Chucha’s Centro Cultural & Bookstore in the San Fernando Valley. In 2016 Tia Chucha Press produced the largest anthology of L.A.-area poets, Coiled Serpent: Poets Arising from the Cultural Quakes & Shifts of Los Angeles. Rodriguez’s last memoir It Calls You Back: An Odyssey Through Love, Addiction, Revolutions, and Healing was a finalist for the 2012 National Book Critics Circle Award. His latest poetry collection Borrowed Bones appeared in 2016 from Curbstone Books/Northwestern University Press.

  • Raised in Philadelphia, with roots in South Africa and Trinidad, Zinzi Clemmons’ writing has appeared in Zoetrope: All-Story, Transition, The Paris Review Daily, and elsewhere. She has received fellowships and support from the MacDowell Colony, Bread Loaf, the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, and the Kimbilio Center for African American Fiction. She is co-founder and former Publisher of Apogee Journal, and a Contributing Editor to LitHub. She teaches literature and creative writing at the Colburn Conservatory and Occidental College. Her debut novel, What We Lose, as well as a second title, are forthcoming from Viking.

O-Tube

About Call Numbers

Classification Systems and Call Numbers

The purpose of a library classification system is to bring related material together in way that will help users locate items of interest to them. Library classification systems organize material by broad subject area. Each item is assigned a call number, which is like an address on a street.

Library of Congress Classification System

LC is used by most academic libraries. It was developed in 1901 as a response to the fact that the Library of Congress collection had grown from several thousand volumes to over a million. They formulated the system based on an actual collection of books rather than a theoretical construct.

LC Outline
A General Works B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion C  Auxiliary Sciences of History
D  History (includes Travel) E  America F  United States. Canada. Latin America
G  Geography H  Social Sciences J  Political Science
K  Law L Education M Music
N  Fine Art P  Language & Literature Q Science
R  Medicine S  Agriculture T  Technology
U  Military Science V  Naval Science Z  Books and Bibliographies

For a more detailed description of the LC call numbers most heavily used in the Otis Library, see What the Call Numbers Mean.


Example of an LC Call Number for the following book:
Techno.Seduction: An Exhibition of Multimedia Installation Work by Forty Artists, by Robert Rindler 

N Books about art
6512.5 Specific topic, usually country, time period, or type of art
I56 Further breakdown of topic; in this case, installation art. Often this line is used for the artist or author number.
R56 In this case, this is the author number (Rindler)

 

Dewey Decimal System

The Dewey Classification is used by most public libraries. Melvil Dewey tried to create a system in which all knowledge was theoretically ordered in a logical way. That is, closely related subjects would be near each other. Unfortunately, many new subjects have come into existence since Dewey invented the DDC, causing some problems with this approach. For instance, there were no computers in his time. The only way to expand a Dewey number is through the addition of numbers after the decimal point. The result can be very long and complicated numbers for some subjects.

Dewey Outline
000 General Works 100 Philosophy
200 Religion 300 Social Sciences
400 Languages 500 Pure Science
600 Technology 700 The Arts
800 Literature 900 Geography and History


Example of a Dewey Call Number for the same book listed above:
Techno.Seduction: An Exhibition of Multimedia Installation Work by Forty Artists, by Robert Rindler 

709.73 Subject is art history. The .73 is the sub-category American art and artists.
RIN The first 3 letters of the author's last name (Rindler).


Other Things to Notice About Call Numbers

Look carefully at the call number. It is sometimes preceded on the top line by words such as:

  • Oversize
  • Ref.
  • Sp.Coll.

They designate separate areas within the library where books are located. A staff member will point you in the right direction or retrieve the materials for you. Please ask.

Otis College Ranked 6th in Nation by The Economist