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Events
  • Michael Joyce

    Sep 17| Lectures
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    Otis Books/Seismicity Editions is pleased to publish Twentieth-Century Man by Michael Joyce. Starting with a disappearance, Twentieth-Century Man contemplates issues imbedded in aging, memory, language, family, and even life and death, covering and uncovering many profound mysteries.

  • Alice Konitz

    Sep 18| Lectures
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    Graduate Fine Arts, Visiting Artist Lecture Series presents artist, Alice Konitz.

    Thursday, September 18th 11:115am - 12:30pm

    Graduate Studios: 10455 Jefferson Blvd Culver City CA 90230

    Image from alicekonitz.com

     

  • High&Low Bureau is a curatorial duo composed of Yael Messer and Gilad Reich. They curate exhibitions, film programs, performative events and publications, while engaging with a plethora of disciplines, media and modes of artistic expression.Their curatorial practice is dedicated to the exploration of artistic strategies that reflect on, and suggest alternatives to, specific social-political conditions.

  • Los Angeles is a city often described as having no center. Its art community has turned that "disadvantage" into an advantage and given itself a license for adventure. Organizations, galleries, and artists find decentralization to be an exciting option and they establish their addresses in unexpected neighborhoods and zones in the city and even beyond, in other cities and states. What are the challenges and advantages of this programmatic and conceptual strategy? What are the risks, to organization and audience alike? Is this necessary, and if so, is it sustainable?

  • Fritz Haeg

    Sep 25| Lectures
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    Image: Fritz Haeg, working to install the Edible Estate #12 garden in Budapest, 2012. Photo: Andras Kare.

    Graduate Fine Arts, Visiting Artist Lecture Series presents artist, Fritz Haeg.

    Thursday, September 25th 11:15am - 12:30pm

    Graduate Studios: 10455 Jefferson Blvd Culver City CA 90230

  • David Schafer

    Sep 30| Lectures
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    David Schafer is a visual and sound artist working in sculpture, sound, sound, performance, and works on paper. His work is concerned with the structures, translation, and intelligibility, of language and architecture. Schafer has shown nationally and internationally and has received several public commissions. Most recently he has had one-person shows at Studio10 gallery in Bushwick, Brooklyn, NY, and Glendale College Art Gallery, Glendale, CA.

  • Sarah Manguso

    Oct 01| Lectures
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    Sarah Manguso is the author, most recently, of The Guardians: An Elegy for a Friend, named one of the top ten books of the year by Salon. Her previous book, the memoir The Two Kinds of Decay, was named an Editors’ Choice by the New York Times Sunday Book Review and short-listed in the UK for the Wellcome Trust Book Prize and long-listed for the Royal Society Winton Prize. Her other books include the story collection Hard to Admit and Harder to Escape, and the poetry collections Siste Viator and The Captain Lands in Paradise.

O-Tube

Advertising Program: Research Tutorial

Step 1: Do you have basic research skills?

To learn the basics of library research, review the Info Lit Tutorials.

Step 2: Clarify Your Topic

Your instructor may give you topics such as:

  • Top Advertising Agencies in Los Angeles
  • Marketing on a Low Budget
  • Trend Spotting
  • Guerilla Marketing
  • Targeting Your Audience
  • Appealing to Emotions in Marketing and Advertising
  • Media Planning
  • Award Winning Advertising Campaigns

These are actually all fairly broad subjects encompassing many smaller topics. Before you can do systematic research, you must first clarify your exact topic. A good place to start is by generating synonyms for that topic.

Why is this important?

Take, for instance the term "guerilla marketing." Just because that term may be well understood within the advertising world, it is not true that it will always used every time someone writes or publishes something that could be considered guerilla marketing. Plus, it may involve many types of marketing. When you do a "keyword" search on "guerilla marketing," only those documents containing those exact terms be found. It's entirely possible that you could miss an excellent book on "product placement" such as: Product Placement in Hollywood films : A History. (See also: How to Clarify Your Topic)

Presumably you are researching topics that are not entirely familiar to you and you may not know the definitions and be able to create a list of synonyms. In this case, you may want to briefly browse some recommended websites. Keep a pencil and paper handy to jot down terms which you can use in your research process.

NOTE: Here's a good tutorial which explains about Researching Companies Online

Step 3: Find Books

Students often rely too much on Google or Yahoo and neglect better tools and sources. To be a competent researcher, figure out for yourself a systematic methodology and become proficient with a variety of tools.
Definitely try the Library Catalog (OPAC). Try a variety of keyword from your synonyms list to get an overview of what books are in the Otis Library. Through the OPAC, you may also discover alternate terms that you can use in searching other places.

Some of results you will find will be to e-books which are available to the Otis Community online. Within the OPAC, you'll see a link and all you need to do is click it to bring up the Ebrary database. You may also go directly to Ebrary, to search 80,000 full-text electronic books. This database contains an enormous amount information. It is geared towards college students.

Step 4: Find Articles in Magazines and Journals

Find a journal article or two. Start with EBSCO Omni. It contains the full-text for 3,100 magazines and journals covering a wide variety of subject areas, including advertising. One of the magazines included in Adweek. Try a keyword search with some of your terms. If you get too many hits, limit it to a subject search.

Step 5: Look in Newspapers

Find a newspaper article or two. Try eLibrary. These databases have full text of thousands of newspapers, plus transcripts of TV news programs and congressional testimony. You'll definitely have to limit your search in some way. Think about an additional term or two to enter as a means of limiting the number of hits returned. The name of a company or a specific type of product would be a specific additional term. As a general rule, the larger the database, the more terms you can enter. (Click here to learn about Boolean Logic and how it works to refine a search.)

Step 6: Try the Web

As a last step, search for content-rich academic/educational websites. Searching the web can be overwhelming. Too much information may, in fact, be more trouble than not enough. If you want to refine your skill or you are having trouble, go to the Library and talk with Sue Maberry, the Librarian. Finding information is her expertise.

Pages ending in .org or .edu may be the best ones, but make sure the author is not a student doing a class assignment or that the page is not simply a course syllabus.