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  • Silke Otto-Knapp is a painter and associate professor of painting and drawing at UCLA. 
     
    She has had recent one-person exhibitions at Overduin and Kite, Los Angeles; Galerie Buchholz, Berlin; the Berkeley Art Museum/Pacific Film Archive; Greengrassi, London; Sadler’s Wells Theatre, London; Kunstverein Munich, Germany; Gavin Brown’s Enterprise, New York; the Banff Centre, Canada; Modern Art Oxford, UK; and Tate Britain, London.
     
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  • Sergej Jensen

    Mar 31| Lectures
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    Sergej Jensen’s work draws on a wide range of materials and formal references. Primarily known for his textile works, his lyrical compositions incorporate a variety of fabrics, from burlap and linen to silk and wool.
     
    He recently exhibited his work in the show "Classic" at Regen Projects, and his work is also included in LACMA's show "Variations: Conversations in and around Abstract Painting.”
  • Otis College of Art and Design Fine Arts Department presents the film collaborative from Berlin OJOBOCA.

     

    Thursday April 2nd, 2015
    7pm in Ahmanson Hall, lower-level screening room.
    9045 Lincoln Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90045

     

  • Rea Tajiri

    Apr 07| Lectures
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    Rea Tajiri is a New York based filmmaker and educator who has written and directed an eclectic body of dramatic, experimental, and documentary films currently in commercial and educational distribution. She is also an Associate Professor at Temple University in the Film Media Arts Department.
     
    Learn more about the artist here.
     
  • Dusk to Dusk

    Apr 11| Exhibition
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    James Aldridge, The Gathering, 2010, Acrylic on canvas


    Dusk to Dusk: Unsettled, Unraveled, Unreal

    April 11 - July 26, 2015  |  Gallery Hours: Tue-Fri 10-5 / Thu 10-7 / Sat-Sun 12-4

  • Come fly a kite!

    Bring your family and friends to make and fly kites at the beach.

    Everyone will receive his or her own free, unique kite along with color theory instruction. Otis students will provide advice.

    Where

    Just north of the Santa Monica Pier
    Parking at the North Parking Lot 1: $12

    When

    Saturday, April 11, 2015, 10 am – 4 pm

O-Tube

Boolean Logic for Better Searching

"Computers are useless. They can only give you answers." --Pablo Picasso

Computers can be very effective tools to locate information, but they are ONLY machines. Computer output depends upon human input.

Computerized search mechanisms are based on Boolean logic. When you use the enter code words known as boolean operators you are telling the computer exactly how to perform a search which will be tailored to your specific needs.

The most commonly used code words are: AND, OR, and NOT. The phrase you enter into a search box is called the search string (or syntax)

Here are some diagrams to help explain the effects of these operators.

 

AND
This operator combines the individual words (terms) in order to create a more specific search.

It actually NARROWS your search.

Possible search strings (or syntax):

cats AND dogs

Some search engines use a plus (+) sign instead of the word AND.

+Cats +dogs 

boolean AND diagram

 

 

OR
This operator combines possible synonyms of the individual words in order to create a wider search.

It actually BROADENS your search.

Possible search strings (or syntax):

films OR movies OR motion pictures

 

boolean OR diagram

 

 

 

NOT 
This operator limits (reduces) your search results by excluding specific terms.

It actually NARROWS, in a very specific way, your search.

Possible search string (syntax):

dolphins NOT football

Some search engines use the minus sign (-) instead of the word NOT.

+Dolphins -football

boolean NOT diagram

Different search engines incorporate Boolean logic in different ways, but they all use it. Some assume AND, some OR. It is important to read the instructions for each search engine before entering your search terms. Info People publishes a nice search engine comparison guide which shows the differences in Boolean syntax used in the different engines: http://infopeople.org/search/chart.html

The use of quotation marks or parenthesis around phrases is a handy device to cause the computer to search for the exact phrase. For instance:

  • "American Beauty"
  • "computer graphics artist"
  • (motion pictures)