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  • Graduate Fine Arts, Visiting Artist Lecture Series presents artist, Jennifer Steinkamp.

    Thursday, October 2nd 11:15am - 12:30pm

    Graduate Studios: 10455 Jefferson Blvd Culver City CA 90230

     

  • OR GALLERY
    10455 JEFFERSON BLVD.
    CULVER CITY, CA 90232
  • Pae White

    Oct 07| Lectures
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    Pae White was born in 1963 in Pasadena, California. She lives and works in Los Angeles. She received her M.F.A. from Art Center College of Design in Pasadena and her B.A. from Scripps College in Claremont, California. She also studied at the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in Maine. Recent solo exhibition venues include Galerie Daniel Buchholz, Cologne; galleria francesca kaufmann, Milan; the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth, New Zealand; the Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver; greengrassi, London; and 1301PE, Los Angeles.

  • Graduate Fine Arts, Visiting Artist Lecture Series presents artist, Paradise Garage.

    Thursday, October 9th 11:15am - 12:30pm

    Graduate Studios: 10455 Jefferson Blvd Culver City CA 90230

     
  • Jennifer Moon

    Oct 14| Lectures
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    Artist, Adventurer, and Revolutionary 

    Phoenix Rising, Part 2: Eros vs. Agape is on view now in Made in L.A. 2014 at the Hammer Museum through Sept. 7th! 
  • ALUMNI EVENT

    The Otis Alumni Council invites you to a reception and artist talk with alumnus Sandow Birk (’89) hosted by Council member Eleana Del Rio (’89) at her art gallery.

    Sandow Birk: American Qur’an  is the final exhibition culminating a nine-year project to create an illuminated manuscript of the Holy Qur’an. Birk will discuss this series and his career with art historian, art critic and Otis faculty member Dr. Jeanne Willette.

     

  • Karen Tei Yamashita is the author of Through the Arc of the Rain Forest, Brazil-Maru, Tropic of Orange, Circle K Cycles, and I Hotel, which was a finalist for the National Book Award and awarded the California Book Award, the American Book Award, the Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association Award, and the Association for Asian American Studies Book Award.

O-Tube

Boolean Logic for Better Searching

"Computers are useless. They can only give you answers." --Pablo Picasso

Computers can be very effective tools to locate information, but they are ONLY machines. Computer output depends upon human input.

Computerized search mechanisms are based on Boolean logic. When you use the enter code words known as boolean operators you are telling the computer exactly how to perform a search which will be tailored to your specific needs.

The most commonly used code words are: AND, OR, and NOT. The phrase you enter into a search box is called the search string (or syntax)

Here are some diagrams to help explain the effects of these operators.

 

AND
This operator combines the individual words (terms) in order to create a more specific search.

It actually NARROWS your search.

Possible search strings (or syntax):

cats AND dogs

Some search engines use a plus (+) sign instead of the word AND.

+Cats +dogs 

boolean AND diagram

 

 

OR
This operator combines possible synonyms of the individual words in order to create a wider search.

It actually BROADENS your search.

Possible search strings (or syntax):

films OR movies OR motion pictures

 

boolean OR diagram

 

 

 

NOT 
This operator limits (reduces) your search results by excluding specific terms.

It actually NARROWS, in a very specific way, your search.

Possible search string (syntax):

dolphins NOT football

Some search engines use the minus sign (-) instead of the word NOT.

+Dolphins -football

boolean NOT diagram

Different search engines incorporate Boolean logic in different ways, but they all use it. Some assume AND, some OR. It is important to read the instructions for each search engine before entering your search terms. Info People publishes a nice search engine comparison guide which shows the differences in Boolean syntax used in the different engines: http://infopeople.org/search/chart.html

The use of quotation marks or parenthesis around phrases is a handy device to cause the computer to search for the exact phrase. For instance:

  • "American Beauty"
  • "computer graphics artist"
  • (motion pictures)