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  • Angie Bray: Shhhh

    Jan 17| Exhibition
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    Angie Bray: Shhhh

    January 17 – March 22, 2015

    Opening Reception: January 24, 4-6pm

    Angie Bray: Shhhh is a substantial exhibition of the Los Angeles–based artist’s installations, photographs, drawings, sculpture and video organized by guest curator Meg Linton for the Ben Maltz Gallery at Otis College of Art and Design. The exhibition opens on Saturday, January 17, 2015.

    About the Exhibition

  • Opening Reception for Angie Bray: Shhhh a substantial exhibition of the Los Angeles–based artist’s installations, photographs, drawings, sculpture and video organized by guest curator Meg Linton for the Ben Maltz Gallery.

  • Walk-thru the exhibition Shhhh led by the artist Angie Bray. Gain insight into Bray's work and to the exhibition, and hear about her process, materials, and philosophies on art-making and on quieting, listening, and looking.

  • The Architecture/Landscape/Interiors Department at OTIS College of Art and Design is pleased to announce the George H. Scanlon Foundation Lecture REDUX.3 by JAMES CORNER


    Wednesday    18 February 2015    7:30 PM
    Ahmanson Auditorium   limited, open seating starting at 7:00 PM  

    at THE MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART, LOS ANGELES

    250 SOUTH GRAND AVENUE  LOS ANGELES CA  90012

     

    This lecture is free and open to the public.

     

  • Bassoon Performance

    Feb 22| Special Event
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    Bassoonist John Steinmetz Performs and Converses with the Audience
    Playing live bassoon inside the exhibition Angie Bray: Shhhh, Steinmetz will react to Bray’s installations by playing some of his own music as well as new compositions, and will converse with the audience, who are encouraged to sit or roam through the gallery looking and listening.

  • Composer Kubilay Üner offers a “reactive” experience with a live presentation of a new composition made in response to the exhibition Angie Bray: Shhhh. The performance will be interspersed with conversation between Üner and Bray.

  • Closing reception for exhibition Angie Bray: Shhhh

O-Tube

Boolean Logic for Better Searching

"Computers are useless. They can only give you answers." --Pablo Picasso

Computers can be very effective tools to locate information, but they are ONLY machines. Computer output depends upon human input.

Computerized search mechanisms are based on Boolean logic. When you use the enter code words known as boolean operators you are telling the computer exactly how to perform a search which will be tailored to your specific needs.

The most commonly used code words are: AND, OR, and NOT. The phrase you enter into a search box is called the search string (or syntax)

Here are some diagrams to help explain the effects of these operators.

 

AND
This operator combines the individual words (terms) in order to create a more specific search.

It actually NARROWS your search.

Possible search strings (or syntax):

cats AND dogs

Some search engines use a plus (+) sign instead of the word AND.

+Cats +dogs 

boolean AND diagram

 

 

OR
This operator combines possible synonyms of the individual words in order to create a wider search.

It actually BROADENS your search.

Possible search strings (or syntax):

films OR movies OR motion pictures

 

boolean OR diagram

 

 

 

NOT 
This operator limits (reduces) your search results by excluding specific terms.

It actually NARROWS, in a very specific way, your search.

Possible search string (syntax):

dolphins NOT football

Some search engines use the minus sign (-) instead of the word NOT.

+Dolphins -football

boolean NOT diagram

Different search engines incorporate Boolean logic in different ways, but they all use it. Some assume AND, some OR. It is important to read the instructions for each search engine before entering your search terms. Info People publishes a nice search engine comparison guide which shows the differences in Boolean syntax used in the different engines: http://infopeople.org/search/chart.html

The use of quotation marks or parenthesis around phrases is a handy device to cause the computer to search for the exact phrase. For instance:

  • "American Beauty"
  • "computer graphics artist"
  • (motion pictures)