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  • Visit the Campus. Get advice on your portfolio. Talk to faculty and students. Learn more about financial aid.

     

    Register now for Open House 2014.

     

    CHECK-IN BEGINS AT 12:30
    WORKSHOPS 

    1:00 – 1:45
    Financing Your Education
    Center for Creative Professions: Create Your Future 

    2:00 – 2:45
    Housing Options: Making a Good Fit

  • Creative Action and the Otis Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

     

    This week 4-6pm is Waves to Asia with DJ Pheonix, DJ Z and DJ Kai, bringing some Asian culture to the air waves, including J-Pop, K-Pop and Chinese Pop, as well as popular anime music. Also as part of the show we will feature a talk about Asian food that you can get and try in Los Angeles.

     

  • Creative Action and the Otis Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

    This week 4-5pm is Rewind 1976 with DJ’s Gabriel Rojas, Nauseous P, and Little C. Join us to count down the songs on the top of the charts... 1976 style. We'll be playing the hits as if it's that very Autumn day 30+ years ago.

  • Otis Radio: Rap Realm

    Nov 10| Special Event
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    Creative Action and the Otis Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

  • Scott Short

    Nov 11| Lectures
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    Scott Short | Born 1964 in Marion, OH | Lives and works in Paris, France 

     

  • Cathy Park Hong's poetry collections include Translating Mo'um and Dance Dance Revolution, which was chosen for the Barnard Women Poets Prize. Norton published her third book of poems, Engine Empire, in 2012. A former Fullbright Fellow, Hong is also the recipient of fellowships from the NEA and the New York Foundation for the Arts. Her poems have been appeared in A Public Space, Poetry, Paris Review, Conjunctions, McSweeney's, APR, Harvard Review, Boston Review, The Nation, and other journals.

  • Monica Majoli

    Nov 13| Lectures
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    Graduate Fine Arts, Visiting Artist Lecture Series presents artist, Monica Majoli.

    Thursday, November 13th 11:115am - 12:30pm

    Graduate Studios: 10455 Jefferson Blvd Culver City CA 90230

O-Tube

Capstone Research and Citing

Research

Research means finding the  best kind of information for the problem that you want to solve. At the senior level (or in any field where time and money matter) you need to find specific information and that usually means going beyond .com websites.

Popular general websites like Wikipedia  give you basic information and it is not always bad information but it has limitations. The better sources for your capstone paper topic will be found in databases which include journals and articles specific to your issue and books (ditto).  You can also get good information from experts in the field so don't overlook interviewing but remember that material from interviews usually has to be put into context or supports and that means....RESEARCH.

To find good sources, you need to learn how to be specific. That can mean using a keyword or phrase like a person's name or a title or specific term. That may lead you to an article or a book that you will need to read and decide how helpful it can be. The library databases include articles, sites, books that are full text and free to you (because the library pays for them).  You may already be familiar with journals or other publications that are germane to your field. Don't overlook government sites (.gov) or educations sites (.edu) for good information.

Be realistic...the more complex your questions and issues, the more you need to read and think and evaluate. Facts are fairly easy to find--they are often in encyclopedias like Britannica but you can't make a strong argument on facts alone. You are going to be asked to explain and interpret and for that you will be using other people's ideas. You may find your position changing as you research; that is the nature of learning.

Finally, don't forget that you can always ask your instructor or the librarian about sources.

Annotated Bibliography

For this paper, you won't be able to do a good job without searching through at least 2-3 appropriate databases. Here is good places to begin: Library Databases.

Then create an annotated bibliography of at least 4-5 resources, some of which by necessity will be found through the Otis databases, including the OPAC, and include journal articles and/or books. You must annotate and evaluate the sources including the identifying the credentials of the author and the type of information (scholarly, popular, etc.) and intended autience. (See CRAAP Detection and Types of Information)

Sample Annotations

Jagodzinski, Jan. Youth Fantasies: The Perverse Landscape of the Media. Gordonsville, VA: Palgrave Macmillan, 2004. ebrary. Web. 29 July 2013.

[Author Credentials]  Jan Jagodzinski is a professor in the department of Secondary Education at the University of Alberta with a Ph.D in education and a scholarly focus on teenagers and popular culture influences. He has written lots of articles on these subjects that have been published in peer-edited journals; this is his second book on the subject. [Audience/Type of Information] The information is a decade old so some of his examples are a little outdated. The book has a bibliography of 85 sources, is heavily footnoted and many of the footnotes are annotated. There are many images including photographs and screen shots from television shows and several graphs and charts. This is a scholarly source that targets an academic audience, especially undergraduate and graduate students. Palgrave Macmillan publishes globally but concentrates on the humanities and social sciences. [How Work Illuminates your Topic] In this book, the author attempts to examine youth culture. Rather than simply attempting to determine the effects of activities teens become involved with, he examines why they become interested in them in the first place, and attempts to rethink the lines of what the realities of teenagers are and what our fantasies of them are.

Bosacki, Sandra, et al. "Preadolescents' Self-Concept and Popular Magazine Preferences." Journal of Research in Childhood Education 23.3 (2009): 340-50. ProQuest. Web. 29 July 2013.

[Author Credentials] Dr. Sandra Bosacki is the Associate Professor (PhD) in the Department of Graduate and Undergraduate Studies in Education at Brock University in Canada. [Audience/Type of Information] The journal is the official publication of the Official Journal of the Association for Childhood Education International. It’s scholarly. [How Work Illuminates your Topic] This article draws on a larger study of Canadian children's sense of self and media habits. The analysis shows a great diversity in preadolescents' magazine reading habits and self-descriptions. Results showed that across all ages, girls preferred mainly fashion and entertainment magazines, whereas boys preferred mainly magazines concerning sports and video games. This is good information for my paper because it analyzes the interests of children by gender.

Wolfgang, Ben. "Police to Use Social Media as Way to Head Off Flash Mobs." The Washington Times, August 18, 2011, A1.

[Author Credentials] Ben Wolfgang is a national reporter for The Washington Times. Before coming to the Times, he spent four years as a political reporter in Pennsylvania. His focus is on education and science policy. [Audience/Type of Information] This article is in a newspaper and can be considered directed at a popular audience. The article is fairly short and primarily just reporting without a lot of analysis. [How Work Illuminates your Topic] I am interested in how social media is used by youth, but this is a case where police seem to using the media against the organizers. The article is clearly biased toward considering flash mobs a crime that is organized quickly by youth on social media. The youth are referred to as “troublemakers.”

Citations

Students are often confused about what to cite, when to cite, how to cite.  In a world with so much information available, it is important to acknowledge the original ideas and the exact words of your sources. Citing is like leaving a trail for the reader to know exactly where you got any information that was not your original idea. This includes images as well unless they are your original work. It means that it you paraphrase original ideas or texts, you still need to cite the source. Paraphrasing is a good idea most of the time because it means that what you are writing keeps the same syle and voice and you get the information across...much better than long quotations. Proper citations in MLA style and a Works Cited page must accompany all papers.

By the senior level you should know when and how to cite but...it you are still not sure, there are very good educational sites listed at Citing Sources.

Plagiarism

Check yourself by putting your paper through Grammarly (Otis has an account. Use your Otis email). Plagiarism occurs when a person deliberately uses another person’s concepts, language, images, music, or other original (not common knowledge) material without acknowledging the source and/or making substantial modifications. While referencing or appropriating may be part of a studio or Liberal Arts and Sciences assignment, it is the student’s ethical responsibility to acknowledge and/or modify the original material.

See also: Otis Plagiarism Policy

Specific examples of plagiarism include:

  • Submitting someone else’s work in whole or part (including copying directly from a source
  • Having someone else produce, revise, or substantially alter all or part of a written paper or studio assignment.
  • Cutting and pasting any textual or image-based work from the internet without proper documentation or clarification of sources.
  • Failure to cite sources.