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Events
  • Otis welcomes the Japan Foundation and honored guests Kashiwagi Hiroshi and Yoshifumi Nakamura for a lecture on contemporary Japanese design. 
  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring Matthew Brandt, a Los Angeles-based artist. Read more about him here.
    Contact: Soo Kim, skim@otis.edu
  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring Kerry Tribe, an artist working primarily in film, video, and installation. Read more about her here
     
    Contact: Soo Kim, skim@otis.edu
  • You are invited to a Movies that Matter Special Screening of the powerful new film shaping the debate about rape on college campuses, The Hunting Ground, on Tuesday, September 15 at 7:15 PM in the Otis Forum.  The Hunting Ground is a startling exposé of sexual assaults on U.S. colleges, institutional cover-ups and the brutal social toll on the victims and their families from the Academy Award-nominated filmmaking team of Kirby Dick and Amy Ziering.
  • Otis Books is pleased to publish Tim Erickson’s debut collection of poetry, Egopolis, a textual journey through destruction, resistance, city, and the Ego, from ancient times to the present day. Erickson’s work has appeared in the Chicago Review, Western Humanities Review, and the Salt Anthology of New Writing. He lives in Salt Lake City.

  • The Architecture/Landscape/Interiors Department at OTIS College of Art and Design is pleased to announce a lecture by 

  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring Hassan Khan, an artist who lives and works in Cairo, Egypt. Read more about him here.

     

    Contact: Soo Kim, skim@otis.edu

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Caxton and the Polychronicon of 1482

An original leaf from the Polychronicon printed by William Caxton at Westminster in the year 1482
Location: Special Collections Z232 C38 K87

The book, beautifully designed and letterpress printed in 1938 by the Grabhorn Press for The Book Club of California contains a specimen, an actual original page from the Polychronicon.

The Polychronicon (Universal History) was printed by William Caxton in 1482 and circulated widely. It was written by Benedictine monks and is actually more legend than fact. But it was Caxton's most ambitious printing project and the longest book in terms of page count.

All books printed before 1501 are called incunabula.

Incunabula (Latin: cradle or infancy) - Refers to the first fifty years of printing with moveable type, printing completed before 1501, a time when some books were still being hand-copied.

Caxton cover
Cover

Caxton title page

Title page

Caxton page

Full page

Caxton page detail

Detail of text