Events
  • For the second year in a row, Otis will be hosting the Community Works Institute - Summer West. This is a five day professional development program for K-16 teachers focused on place based education, service learning and sustainability. There is a discounted rate for Otis faculty, staff, students and alumni to participate. Contact the Artists Community Teaching program for more info: act@otis.edu

  • Classes End.

  • I Know What You Did This Summer is a series of bi-weekly gatherings in the Bolsky Gallery at Otis College of Art and Design organized around informal slideshow presentations by curators, artists, writers and producers in the Los Angeles area. Taking the form of a personal travelogue, presenters will share places, experiences, and encounters during summer travel near and far. I Know What You Did This Summer is an occasion to enjoy drinks and conversation among friends, colleagues and our community.

    July 7: Anna Sew Hoy / Jesse Stecklow

O-Tube

Codex Tro-Cortesianus

Codex Tro-Cortesianus
Location: Special Collections F 1435 C653

"The Mayan peoples developed a method of hieroglyphic notation and recorded mythology, history, and rituals in inscriptions carved and painted on stelae (stone slabs or pillars); on lintels and stairways; and on other monumental remains. Records were also painted in hieroglyphs and preserved in books of folded sheets of paper made from the fibers of the maguey plant.

Four examples of these codices have been preserved: the Codex Dresdensis, now in Dresden; the Perez Codex, now in Paris; and the Codex Tro and the Codex Cortesianus, both now in Madrid. The Codex Tro and Codex Cortesianus comprise parts of a single original document and are commonly known under the joint name Codex Tro-Cortesianus.

These books were used as divinatory almanacs containing topics such as agriculture, weather, disease, hunting, and astronomy.

One of the four preserved codices of Maya hieroglyphs, the Codex Tro dates from about the 14th century. These ornate pages from the Codex form part of a prophetic calendar that predicts good and bad days. The ancient Maya used paints made of natural pigments and paper made from the fibers of maguey plants to record religious information and historical events." - Foundation for the Advancement of Mesoamerican Studies

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