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Events
  • Patrons Circle Tour

    May 30| Special Event
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    Otis' Patrons Circle Tour of Downtown L.A.!

    Discover how the creative economy is transforming downtown Los Angeles.  Studios and galleries continue to move to the heart of our city and into areas that were off the beaten path just a year ago. Otis Patrons Circle members will enjoy an Otis-inspired tour of downtown L.A.'s vibrant scene.  

    Tour includes:
    Visit to Kent Twitchell's ('77 MFA) new studio, followed by a short ride to see a few of his downtown murals

    Inside peek of Cynthia Vincent's ('88 Fashion Design) fashion design studio

  • Design Week 2015

    Jun 21| Special Event
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    OTIS’ MFA GRAPHIC DESIGN PROGRAM HOSTS:

    I AM THE CITY

    Design Week
    June 21-27, 2015

     

    VISITING ARTISTS

    Field Experiments: Benjamin Harrison Bryant, New York and Paul Marcus Fuog, Melbourne and Karim Charlebois-Zariffa, Quebec/NYC www.field-experiments.com

  • Bolsky

    Jun 27| Exhibition
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    Image: Erin Watson, Sausage, 2014, Inkjet print, 20 x 30 inches


    The Nature of Personal Reality

    June 27 – September 1, 2015
    Opening Reception: Saturday, June 27, 4-6pm
     

  • Opening Reception

    Jun 27| Special Event
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    Image: Erin Watson, Sausage, 2014, Inkjet print, 20 x 30 inches


    The Nature of Personal Reality

    Opening Reception: Saturday, June 27, 4-6pm

O-Tube

Codex Tro-Cortesianus

Codex Tro-Cortesianus
Location: Special Collections F 1435 C653

"The Mayan peoples developed a method of hieroglyphic notation and recorded mythology, history, and rituals in inscriptions carved and painted on stelae (stone slabs or pillars); on lintels and stairways; and on other monumental remains. Records were also painted in hieroglyphs and preserved in books of folded sheets of paper made from the fibers of the maguey plant.

Four examples of these codices have been preserved: the Codex Dresdensis, now in Dresden; the Perez Codex, now in Paris; and the Codex Tro and the Codex Cortesianus, both now in Madrid. The Codex Tro and Codex Cortesianus comprise parts of a single original document and are commonly known under the joint name Codex Tro-Cortesianus.

These books were used as divinatory almanacs containing topics such as agriculture, weather, disease, hunting, and astronomy.

One of the four preserved codices of Maya hieroglyphs, the Codex Tro dates from about the 14th century. These ornate pages from the Codex form part of a prophetic calendar that predicts good and bad days. The ancient Maya used paints made of natural pigments and paper made from the fibers of maguey plants to record religious information and historical events." - Foundation for the Advancement of Mesoamerican Studies