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Events
  • Otis welcomes the Japan Foundation and honored guests Kashiwagi Hiroshi and Yoshifumi Nakamura for a lecture on contemporary Japanese design. 
  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring Matthew Brandt, a Los Angeles-based artist. Read more about him here.
    Contact: Soo Kim, skim@otis.edu
  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring Kerry Tribe, an artist working primarily in film, video, and installation. Read more about her here
     
    Contact: Soo Kim, skim@otis.edu
  • You are invited to a Movies that Matter Special Screening of the powerful new film shaping the debate about rape on college campuses, The Hunting Ground, on Tuesday, September 15 at 7:15 PM in the Otis Forum.  The Hunting Ground is a startling exposé of sexual assaults on U.S. colleges, institutional cover-ups and the brutal social toll on the victims and their families from the Academy Award-nominated filmmaking team of Kirby Dick and Amy Ziering.
  • Otis Books is pleased to publish Tim Erickson’s debut collection of poetry, Egopolis, a textual journey through destruction, resistance, city, and the Ego, from ancient times to the present day. Erickson’s work has appeared in the Chicago Review, Western Humanities Review, and the Salt Anthology of New Writing. He lives in Salt Lake City.

  • The Architecture/Landscape/Interiors Department at OTIS College of Art and Design is pleased to announce a lecture by 

  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring Hassan Khan, an artist who lives and works in Cairo, Egypt. Read more about him here.

     

    Contact: Soo Kim, skim@otis.edu

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Codex Tro-Cortesianus

Codex Tro-Cortesianus
Location: Special Collections F 1435 C653

"The Mayan peoples developed a method of hieroglyphic notation and recorded mythology, history, and rituals in inscriptions carved and painted on stelae (stone slabs or pillars); on lintels and stairways; and on other monumental remains. Records were also painted in hieroglyphs and preserved in books of folded sheets of paper made from the fibers of the maguey plant.

Four examples of these codices have been preserved: the Codex Dresdensis, now in Dresden; the Perez Codex, now in Paris; and the Codex Tro and the Codex Cortesianus, both now in Madrid. The Codex Tro and Codex Cortesianus comprise parts of a single original document and are commonly known under the joint name Codex Tro-Cortesianus.

These books were used as divinatory almanacs containing topics such as agriculture, weather, disease, hunting, and astronomy.

One of the four preserved codices of Maya hieroglyphs, the Codex Tro dates from about the 14th century. These ornate pages from the Codex form part of a prophetic calendar that predicts good and bad days. The ancient Maya used paints made of natural pigments and paper made from the fibers of maguey plants to record religious information and historical events." - Foundation for the Advancement of Mesoamerican Studies