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  • Join us for the ultimate genre mash up as we drop the best hip hop and underground hiphop from all over as well as some of the freshest hard hitting electronic music out today. Presented by DJ Chewby (Pamela Torzan), DJ Snowden (Ryan Snowden) Daybid 1X (David Namkoong), and 90’s Kid (Danial Siddiqui) of the Otis Radio class.

     

  • Come enjoy the awesomeness of Soundtracks from Games, Movies and TV Shows with DJ Tea Time (Joshua Timmons), DJ SurgeMiester (Sergio Betancourt ) and DJ ForGrapeJelly (Steven Escarcega).

     

  • Fine Arts presents a lecture by painter Mary Weatherford. She received her BA from Princeton and MFA from Bard. Weatherford has shown at David Kordansky Gallery in L.A., LAxART in L.A., Brennan & Griffin in New York, and Debs & Co in New York.  In addition, her work is included in collections of MoMA, LACMA, Hammer Museum, Museum of Contemporary Art in San Diego, and OCMA.
    All are welcome
    Series organized by Photography Director Soo Kim
  • Cesar Garcia – Director and Chief Curator, The Mistake Room
    Glenn Kaino – contemporary artist
    Kris Kuramitsu – Deputy Director and Senior Curator, The Mistake Room

    In conjunction with Otis’ Creative Action program, Big City Forum presents a series of four discussions featuring individuals who reinvent social space and redefine how we engage with each other.

  • “Foregrounds” is a show exploring how we listen to sounds. It utilizes field recordings by blending songs and spoken word pieces with the soundscapes in which we listen to them – whether it be played along with Los Angeles traffic, the sound of a meal being prepared, or waves at the beach. Presented by DJ Derek (Corn), DJ Nasera (Alayon), DJ Max (Miles) of the Otis Radio class.

     

  • HOT & HE∆VY

    Apr 28| Special Event
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  • Tour I: Artists Studios

    May 03| Continuing Education
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    Fee: $75
    In conjunction with Freeway Studies #2: Inside the Quad

    Curators Meg Linton and Jeseca Dawson lead a tour of artists studios located "inside the quad." Tour includes transportation, lunch, and snacks.

O-Tube

English Composition

Step 1: Pick Your Terms

Your assignment will vary depending on your instructor, but you will probably be asked to research a subject and compare what you learn about it with its film treatment. The first step should be to get clear on the terms you want to search. This may not be an easy task. Ideas can be expressed in many ways. For instance the topic of "gender" could be researched using terms such as feminism, feminist theory, masculinity, gay, women, woman, men, sexuality, homosexuality, androgyny, etc. Depending on the database used and how it searches, you may have to do multiple searches trying various keywords.

To begin, brainstorm and create a list of possible terms you may use in researching. First, try a preliminary search in a database and look carefully at the results. From the first set of results, you can find other terms you may not have thought of. Add them to your list. Then modify your keywords and your strategy to clarify your topic.

A definition of a term could be a good way to start off a paper. The Oxford English Dictionary would be a good starting point for that.

Step 2: What Kind of Information Do You Want?

Identifying the type of information that you need will help in formulating a search strategy. Think about this and get as specific as you can. Here are some examples:

Information Needed: Try terms like these in various combinations: You could look for: Recommended Database:

A psychological interpretation of the horror film genre Horror, horror tales, cinema, movies, films, interpretation, history, criticism, analysis, morality, morality tale(s), psychoanalysis, psychological, gender, sexuality, feminism, feminist, masculinity, Gore Verbinski, Alfred Hitchcock, etc. Articles in psychological journals, scholarly film journals, or journals about popular culture or chapters in books For articles:
OmniFile
E-Library

For Books:
Ebrary
Otis OPAC

Moral or religious tales implied within Westerns Western films, Westerns, heroes in motion pictures, allegory, myth, mythology, Clint Eastwood, morality, masculinity, cinema, movies, films, interpretation, history, criticism, etc. Articles in mythology journals, scholarly film journals, history journals or chapters in books For articles:
OmniFile
E-Library

For Books:
Ebrary
Otis OPAC

Analysis of the portrayal of suburbia in popular culture suburban life, suburb(s), suburbia, urban sprawl, social life and customs, America, 1950s, postwar, popular culture, Los Angeles, history Articles in history journals, scholarly film journals, or journals about American studies or chapters in books For articles:
OmniFile
E-Library

For Books:
Ebrary
Otis OPAC

Step 3: The Annotated Bibliography

You'll need to create an annotated bibliography or "works cited page" similar to the one you created for Introduction to Visual Culture. There's an excellent guide to Citing Sources online.

Many faculty at Otis require annotations in bibliographies. They're looking for brief descriptions that evaluate the quality and credibility of your sources. Include the following information:

  1. Description of the author's credentials
  2. Type of information the source represents
  3. How the source was located. (database, search engine, terms)
  4. Specifically how the source will be useful in writing your paper. Give examples.

Example of an annotation:

Arnault, Lynne S. "Cruelty, Horror, and the Will to Redemption." Hypatia 18:2 (Spring 2003) 155-88. Wilson OmniFile Full Text Select. Otis College Library. Los Angeles. 11 Sept. 2003.

How located: As a research tool, I used OmniFile through Wilson Web to find this citation. Author's credentials: I first clicked on her name to see if she had written other articles that appear in this database. But there weren't any others. So I looked her up on Google. There's a professor by this name, a Phd. in the Communications Department with a specialty in Feminist Theory at Leymoyne College in NY.

Type of information: This article would be considered "scholarly" because it's long, in-depth. It was somewhat difficult to read and seems to be directed towards educated readers. Also, there were many footnotes. Why what's written will be of benefit in your paper: From the abstract it says that "Americans cherish the idea that good eventually triumphs over evil" and that she argues that "a proper understanding of the moral harm of cruelty calls into question the credibility of popular American idioms of redemption." This seems to be directly related to the role of horror films in Americans culture.

Run Your Paper through Grammarly

Grammarly will assist you with grammar, but also help prevent plagiarism!
 

Remember

The librarians and the library staff are available. Ask for reference/research assistance at any time. It's our job. You're not bothering us.

The LAS department also has tutors available to assist you with the writing or word processing. Start early so that you will have time to avail yourself of these services. We all want to support your learning experience.