Events
  • Daniel Mendel-Black has exhibited widely in the U.S. and abroad. Recent shows include Pretty Lips Are Red at China Art Objects Galleries in Los Angeles, and André Butzer, Marcel Hüppauff, Daniel Mendel-Black, Philipp Schwalb at Galerie Bernd Kugler in Innsbruck, Austria. Mendel-Black’s work is represented in a number of public collections.

  • Join us at the opening of our 2017 exhibition on THURSDAY, JANUARY 19TH at 6:30pm at Otis College Fine Art Graduate Studios. Exhibit curated by GFA Students, Alex Kay and Shirin Bolourchi.

  • Tim Walsh, is the inventor of the board game Blurt!, which sold more than a milion copies. Tim has lincesned toy and game concepts to Hasbro, Mattel, Brio, Educational Insights, Imagine Entertaiment, and others. Be inspired and entertained by the stories behind the creation of blockbuster toys and games.

     

  • Todd Bradford Richmond presents a solo exhibition of new paintings and installation for his Graduate Thesis at The Bolsky Gallery, Otis College of Art & Design, on view January 22 to February 1, 2017 (closes at 12noon on Feb 1). There will be an artist reception on Saturday, January 28, 2-6pm.

  • Tim Davis's wry photographs find the sublime in the quotidian. Whether shooting an abandoned pair of sneakers, the streets of a nameless suburb, or the corner of a framed painting in a museum, Davis captures the peripheral, everyday beauty of our daily life.

  • Otis College of Art and Design and The Art and Design Department at CSUDH will be partnering to bring two Ceramics Artist, Diego Romero and Michael Sherrill to give a guest lecture and workshop demonstration to take place at both campuses in conjunction with the 73rd Scripps Ceramic Annua, curated by Joan Takayama-Ogawa (Otis College Faculty member).

  • Workshop at Otis College campus with ceramic artist, Michael Sherrill.

O-Tube

Facts about Mass Media

Don't Accept Media at Face Value; Think Critically, Ask Questions


Mass Media is directed towards large audiences.

  • It is public, the content is open to all audiences are made up of people living under different conditions in widely different cultures.
  • It establishes contact with people at a distance from the media source and from each other.
  • The audience for mass communications is unique to modern society.
  • The Web is just another form of mass media.

 

 

ASK: What?

What is the main idea? How was this constructed? What picture of the world is being presented? What people and what subjects are represented and how? Are the portrayals of people or other subjects accurate, exaggerated, biased? What argument is being made? However realistic, natural, or factual a media project may seem to be, it is always a construction. Instead of reflecting reality it represents a specific aspect of it from a specific perspective.

ASK: Who?

Whose point of view is it? What does the author want the viewer to think about the image? Each media product is intended for a particular audience and it is important to ask who the target audience is. Are there assumptions built in to the text or image that the media makes about its audience? How about the audience's assumptions? Each person will interpret the same text or image differently, bringing their own experience to it when critically analyzing its meaning.

ASK: What values/ideologies underlie this?

The media convey values through form and content. Sometimes the values are obvious, but more often they are hidden behind what may appear to be a neutral stance. The important thing to remember is that they are always there even if they are part of the shared assumptions of the mainstream culture in a way that makes them seem invisible.

ASK: About Evidence?

What facts or information are offered in support of the argument or idea being presented? How reliable is the information? What is the form of the presentation? How is the message conveyed via words, images, and sounds?

ASK: Who owns this? Who benefits from it?

Media products are made for profit. The creative and editorial decisions made by producers are based on what will sell. Consider who might be selling what to whom when evaluating a media text/image.

Most of the ideas came from the Center for Media Literacy web site and The New Media Literacy Handbook by Cornelia Brunner and William Tally.

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