Events
  • For the second year in a row, Otis will be hosting the Community Works Institute - Summer West. This is a five day professional development program for K-16 teachers focused on place based education, service learning and sustainability. There is a discounted rate for Otis faculty, staff, students and alumni to participate. Contact the Artists Community Teaching program for more info: act@otis.edu

  • Classes End.

  • I Know What You Did This Summer is a series of bi-weekly gatherings in the Bolsky Gallery at Otis College of Art and Design organized around informal slideshow presentations by curators, artists, writers and producers in the Los Angeles area. Taking the form of a personal travelogue, presenters will share places, experiences, and encounters during summer travel near and far. I Know What You Did This Summer is an occasion to enjoy drinks and conversation among friends, colleagues and our community.

    July 7: Anna Sew Hoy / Jesse Stecklow

O-Tube

Research Cycle

aka "Research Strategy" and "Search Strategy"

The Research Cycle

 

1. Choose Topic

Think of a few possible topics.
List keywords and subjects.
Do some preliminary research in subject encyclopedias and easily-accessible databases.
Re-evaluate and clarify the topic as necessary.
Should I narrow this topic?
Should I broaden this topic?
Do I have enough information now?
Will I be able to find enough information easily?
Am I willing to spend more time searching?
Should I use a different or new topic?
     

2. Make a Plan

Decide how much information is needed.
Decide what types of information will be needed.
Decide on which indexes or databases you will search.
Make a timeline.
Do I need articles or books or both?
Will I need scholarly or popular resources?
Which specific databases will be best to use?
Will I need to look up background information in encyclopedias?
How much time can I spend researching?
     

3. Begin Researching

Systematically begin to follow the plan you have made.
Find citations or sources.
Evaluate each citation carefully using critical thinking skills. Decide if it's worth actually finding the item.
Is this information appropriate?
Who wrote it? Where did it come from?
Can it be trusted? Is it biased? Accurate? Timely?
Is it easily available? Or will I have to go to other libraries?
Am I still happy with this topic?
Should I start over and get a new topic?
     

4. Find the Material

Evaluate each item carefully. Is there a bibliography or are there footnotes that lead me to other important works on the topic?
Does the index or table of contents (of a book) lead me easily to the appropriate  section?
Is this information at a level that I can read and comprehend?
Does this information seem on target and important to my research?
Is this information going to help me understand my topic and write my paper?
Do I need to read this?
     

5. Read the material.

Make notes.
Remember: this is a process that requires continuing evaluation and revision.
Am I learning what I need to learn about my topic?
Am I still happy with the topic?
Have I found the information that best serves my purposes?

 

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