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Events
  • Charlotte Cotton

    “Photography is Magic!”

     

  • Lucy Orta (b. Sutton Coldfield, UK, 1966) and Jorge Orta (b. Rosario, Argentina, 1953) founded Studio Orta in 1991. Lucy + Jorge Orta’s collaborative practice focuses on the social and ecological factors of environmental sustainability to realise major bodies of work employing drawing, sculpture, installation, object making, couture, painting and silkscreen printing, as well staging workshops, ephemeral interventions and performances.

  • Otis Community Banquet

    Oct 22| Special Event
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    In conjunction with the exhibition Food - Water - Life / Lucy + Jorge Orta
    Wednesday, October 22 | Bobrow Green
    11:30am – 12:30pm: Banquet for participating classes
    12:30 – 1:15pm: Open to Otis Community to view class projects created for Banquet, and sample soup and fruit-infused water

  • Graduate Fine Arts, Visiting Artist Lecture Series presents artists Lucy + Jorge Orta.

    Thursday, October 23rd, 10am

    Graduate Studios: 10455 Jefferson Blvd Culver City CA 90230

  • Artists Lucy + Jorge Orta in conversation with the curators Ginger Gregg Duggan and Judith Hoos Fox of the traveling exhibition Food - Water - Life / Lucy + Jorge Orta. The conversation is followed by a reception. Food - Water - Life / Lucy + Jorge Orta is on view in the Ben Maltz Gallery through December 6, 2014.

  • JP Munro

    Oct 28| Lectures
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    Born 1975, Inglewood, CA. Lives and works in Los Angeles, CA.

    chinaartobjects.com/artists/jp-munro/

  • Minor Declaration

    Oct 29| Student Event
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    Highly Recommended for Sophomores

O-Tube

Research Cycle

aka "Research Strategy" and "Search Strategy"

The Research Cycle

 

1. Choose Topic

Think of a few possible topics.
List keywords and subjects.
Do some preliminary research in subject encyclopedias and easily-accessible databases.
Re-evaluate and clarify the topic as necessary.
Should I narrow this topic?
Should I broaden this topic?
Do I have enough information now?
Will I be able to find enough information easily?
Am I willing to spend more time searching?
Should I use a different or new topic?
     

2. Make a Plan

Decide how much information is needed.
Decide what types of information will be needed.
Decide on which indexes or databases you will search.
Make a timeline.
Do I need articles or books or both?
Will I need scholarly or popular resources?
Which specific databases will be best to use?
Will I need to look up background information in encyclopedias?
How much time can I spend researching?
     

3. Begin Researching

Systematically begin to follow the plan you have made.
Find citations or sources.
Evaluate each citation carefully using critical thinking skills. Decide if it's worth actually finding the item.
Is this information appropriate?
Who wrote it? Where did it come from?
Can it be trusted? Is it biased? Accurate? Timely?
Is it easily available? Or will I have to go to other libraries?
Am I still happy with this topic?
Should I start over and get a new topic?
     

4. Find the Material

Evaluate each item carefully. Is there a bibliography or are there footnotes that lead me to other important works on the topic?
Does the index or table of contents (of a book) lead me easily to the appropriate  section?
Is this information at a level that I can read and comprehend?
Does this information seem on target and important to my research?
Is this information going to help me understand my topic and write my paper?
Do I need to read this?
     

5. Read the material.

Make notes.
Remember: this is a process that requires continuing evaluation and revision.
Am I learning what I need to learn about my topic?
Am I still happy with the topic?
Have I found the information that best serves my purposes?