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Events
  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring Matthew Brandt, a Los Angeles-based artist. Read more about him here.
     
  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring Kerry Tribe, an artist working primarily in film, video, and installation. Read more about her here.
  • You are invited to a Movies that Matter Special Screening of the powerful new film shaping the debate about rape on college campuses, The Hunting Ground, on Tuesday, September 15 at 7:15 PM in the Otis Forum.  The Hunting Ground is a startling exposé of sexual assaults on U.S. colleges, institutional cover-ups and the brutal social toll on the victims and their families from the Academy Award-nominated filmmaking team of Kirby Dick and Amy Ziering.
  • Otis Books is pleased to publish Tim Erickson’s debut collection of poetry, Egopolis, a textual journey through destruction, resistance, city, and the Ego, from ancient times to the present day. Erickson’s work has appeared in the Chicago Review, Western Humanities Review, and the Salt Anthology of New Writing. He lives in Salt Lake City.

  • The Architecture/Landscape/Interiors Department at OTIS College of Art and Design is pleased to announce a lecture by 

  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring Hassan Khan, an artist who lives and works in Cairo, Egypt. Read more about him here.

  • Otis Graduate Writing students will read from their works-in-progress.

O-Tube

Research Cycle

aka "Research Strategy" and "Search Strategy"

The Research Cycle

 

1. Choose Topic

Think of a few possible topics.
List keywords and subjects.
Do some preliminary research in subject encyclopedias and easily-accessible databases.
Re-evaluate and clarify the topic as necessary.
Should I narrow this topic?
Should I broaden this topic?
Do I have enough information now?
Will I be able to find enough information easily?
Am I willing to spend more time searching?
Should I use a different or new topic?
     

2. Make a Plan

Decide how much information is needed.
Decide what types of information will be needed.
Decide on which indexes or databases you will search.
Make a timeline.
Do I need articles or books or both?
Will I need scholarly or popular resources?
Which specific databases will be best to use?
Will I need to look up background information in encyclopedias?
How much time can I spend researching?
     

3. Begin Researching

Systematically begin to follow the plan you have made.
Find citations or sources.
Evaluate each citation carefully using critical thinking skills. Decide if it's worth actually finding the item.
Is this information appropriate?
Who wrote it? Where did it come from?
Can it be trusted? Is it biased? Accurate? Timely?
Is it easily available? Or will I have to go to other libraries?
Am I still happy with this topic?
Should I start over and get a new topic?
     

4. Find the Material

Evaluate each item carefully. Is there a bibliography or are there footnotes that lead me to other important works on the topic?
Does the index or table of contents (of a book) lead me easily to the appropriate  section?
Is this information at a level that I can read and comprehend?
Does this information seem on target and important to my research?
Is this information going to help me understand my topic and write my paper?
Do I need to read this?
     

5. Read the material.

Make notes.
Remember: this is a process that requires continuing evaluation and revision.
Am I learning what I need to learn about my topic?
Am I still happy with the topic?
Have I found the information that best serves my purposes?