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Events
  • Creative Action and the Otis Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

  • Objects In Crisis is a series of two-person exhibitions by students in the Photography 3 class. 

     

    Exhbition 1--November 18-22:  Greg Toothacre and Lani De Soto

    Reception: Thursday, November 20 @ 6 pm

     

    Exhibition 2--December 2-6:  Allison Mogan and Tia Chen

    Reception:  Thursday, December 4 @ 6 pm

     

    Exhibition 3--December 8-12: Yijia Liu and Cara Friedman

  • Mary Alinder

    Dec 02| Lectures
    More

     

  • Professor Julia Czerniak is educated in both architecture and landscape architecture, and serves as Associate Dean at the School of Architecture at Syracuse University. Through her own design practice, CLEAR, and most recently as the former inaugural Director of UPSTATE: Syracuse’s SOA’s Center for Design, Research and Real-Estate, Julia’s  research and practice draw on the intersection of landscape and architecture.

  • Alumni from Otis, Art Center, and CalArts are invited to celebrate the holidays at our second annual alumni holiday mixer. Eat, drink, be merry, and enjoy live music! Alumni are invited to bring a guest, but this event is closed to the public.

     

    RSVP by December 1

    www.CalArtsOtisArtCenter.eventbrite.com

O-Tube

Two Winchester Bibles

The Two Winchester Bibles

Walter Oakeshott, Clarendon Press, 1981

Location: Special Collections

This large-format book is a study of the Winchester Bibles and the artists who illuminated them. Walter Oakeshott is a scholar in the area of Medieval Art and illustrated manuscripts.

The Winchester Bible is the finest of the great 12th century illuminated bibles, distinguished by its sheer size and sumptuous decoration. Using over 250 skins of calves, illuminators working over a period of 15 years depicted words and scenes from the Bible in pure gold and lapis lazuli from Afghanistan.

"Although the script of the Winchester Bible was mainly the work of one scribe, it was decorated by several artists working in widely different styles, both figural and decorative. It is difficult to imagine that artists of such widely differing attitudes could be contemporaries, although it is possible that some worked in conservative styles concurrently with others who were introducing new ideas. An understanding of the artists involved is complicated by the fact that some of them painted over drawings by others with the consequent interaction between the various styles. The differences between the artists suggest that they were lay professionals of diverse origins and artistic backgrounds, who were employed to decorate a Bible produced within the monastic scriptorium. Blank spaces in the book and illustrations left in a drawn stage reveal that its decoration was never completed." -- Oxford Art Online

Winchester Bible at BodleianDavid harping, and St. Jerome writing, in Beatus initial. Bible, Winchester, 2nd half of 12th century. ‘The Auct. Bible’ or ‘St. Hugh’s Bible’, vol. II. Bodleian Library, Oxford, England.

Winchester Bible at CathedralGod touches Jeremiah’s lips with the gift of prophecy. Cathedral Library, Winchester, England. Photo by John Crook.