Events
  • Guthrie Lonergan was born in 1984 in Los Angeles. He received a Bachelor of Arts from the University of California, Los Angeles in 2006.

  • Margo Victor

    Sep 29| Lectures
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    Margo Victor lives and works in Los Angeles, California and received her BFA at the California Institute of the Arts. Her work has been exhibited at Kunstlerhaus Stuttgart and Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam; Happy Lion in Chinatown, Los Angeles, California; Cirrus Gallery in Los Angeles; Elizabeth Dee Gallery in New York.

  • Shila Khatami

    Oct 04| Lectures
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    Shila Khatami has had solo exhibitions at:
    Autocenter in Berlin, Kunstverein Dillingen, 
    Galerie Samy Abraham in Paris, 
    Galerie Susanna Kulli in Zurich, 
    Clages in Cologne and Treize in Paris.
    Group exhibitions include:
    “00ooOO - holes, dots, balls“ with Davide Bertocchi at Hopstreet, Brussels ; 
    “Punkt-Systeme,Vom Pointilismus zum Pixel“ at the Wilhelm Hack Museum, Ludwigshafen; 
    „BYOB“ at Palais de Tokyo, Paris; 
    “Dorothea“ at Ancient & Modern, London; 
    “Ambigu“ at Kunstmuseum St. Gallen.

  • John Keene

    Oct 05| Lectures
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    John Keene is the author of the novels Annotations and Counternarratives, as well as several other works, including the poetry collection Seismosis, with artist Christopher Stackhouse, and a translation of Brazilian author Hilda Hilst's novel Letters from a Seducer. The recipient of a Whiting Award, Keene has been a member of the Dark Room Writers Collective and a Cave Canem fellow. He has served as the managing editor of Callaloo and taught at Northwestern. He currently teaches at Rutgers University-Newark and lives in New York.

  • Leonardo Bravo is an artist, curator, and educator and the Founder of Big City Forum. Big City Forum is an interdisciplinary project designed to explore the intersection between design-based creative disciplines (Design, Architecture, Urban Planning, etc) that take into account public space and the built environment. Big City Forum facilitates the exchange of ideas through gatherings, symposiums, exhibitions, and special events that promote forward-thinking projects and the individuals at the forefront of this vision.

  • Chris Coy

    Oct 11| Lectures
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    Chris Coy is an artist and filmmaker. His work has shown at the New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York, the Sundance Film Festival, the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, the Netherlands Media Art Institute, and numerous international art festivals and exhibitions. He received his MFA from the University of Southern California in 2012. He is represented by Anat Ebgi, Los Angeles.

  • Professor Karen Tongson joined the USC faculty in English and Gender Studies in fall 2005. She received her Ph.D. in English from the University of California, Berkeley. Before coming to USC, Tongson held a University of California President's Postdoctoral Fellowship in Literature at UC San Diego, and a UC Humanities Research Institute (UCHRI) Residential Research Fellowship at UC Irvine.

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Types of Sources and Information

Identifying the intended audience for information is one step in evaluating sources. The descriptions of types of information below can apply equally to periodicals, books, and web pages. Use this in your annotations. See also CRAAP Detection.

Academic, Scholarly, Peer Reviewed

  • Articles written by scholars or researchers in the field, often faculty with Ph.Ds
  • Almost always lists sources and/or includes a bibliography
  • Reports on original research or experimentation
  • Often published by a university press, research center or academic association
  • May contain visual information including charts and graphs that is appropriate and specific to the field and discipline.
  • May be scholarly because of the credentials of the writers, but targeted towards students, such as an encyclopedia
  • Not usually available on a newsstand
  • Examples of periodicals: Fashion Theory, Domus, Art History, Art Bulletin, Journal of the American Medical Association
     

Industry /Trade / Professional Publications

(sometimes referred to as "Professional")

  • Written for (and usually by) people in an industry or field rather than a university professor
  • Assumes knowledge of the field
  • Not usually available on the newsstand
  • Only sometimes lists sources or includes bibliography
  • Often published by a professional association
  • Examples of periodicals: American Libraries, Playthings, Communication Arts, Animation Magazine
     

Substantive News

  • Often glossy in appearance with color illustrations
  • Sometimes list sources or includes bibliography
  • Usually available on the newsstand
  • Articles usually have a named author/s
  • Level of writing geared to educated or well-read audience
  • Examples of periodicals: National Geographic, Art in America, Artforum, Wall Street Journal, Discover
     

Popular

  • Easily purchased on newsstands, bookstores or available for free via the Internet
  • Geared towards general audiences
  • Articles written by staff writers or freelance writers 
  • Slick or glossy (in print version), with lots of advertising
  • Seldom includes list of sources 
  • Examples of periodicals: People, Sports Illustrated, Vogue, Rolling Stone
     

Sensational

  • Variety of styles, but often newspaper format when in print
  • Language is elementary and occasionally inflammatory or sensational
  • Often unsigned
  • Purpose is to arouse curiosity and to cater to popular superstitions
  • Flashy headlines designed to astonish
  • Examples of periodicals/websites: National Enquirer, Star, some Yahoo News