Events
  • Todd Bradford Richmond presents a solo exhibition of new paintings and installation for his Graduate Thesis at The Bolsky Gallery, Otis College of Art & Design, on view January 22 to February 1, 2017 (closes at 12noon on Feb 1). There will be an artist reception on Saturday, January 28, 2-6pm.

  • Tim Davis's wry photographs find the sublime in the quotidian. Whether shooting an abandoned pair of sneakers, the streets of a nameless suburb, or the corner of a framed painting in a museum, Davis captures the peripheral, everyday beauty of our daily life.

  • Under Armour on Campus

    Jan 24| Student Event
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    Career Services is hosting Under Armour for Lunch & Learn and portfolio reviews. They are actively recruiting for paid summer internships and post grad employment in the following areas: Accessories Design Apparel Design Graphic Design – Apparel, Brand, Retail and Web Film & Video Production Footwear Design Technical Design, Patternmaking & Product Fit
  • Otis College of Art and Design and The Art and Design Department at California State University Dominguez Hills will be partnering to bring two Ceramics Artist, Diego Romero ('90) and Michael Sherrill to give a guest lecture and workshop demonstration to take place at both campuses in conjunction with the 73rd Scripps Ceramic Annua, curated by Joan Takayama-Ogawa (Otis College Faculty member).

  • Workshop at Otis College campus with ceramic artist, Michael Sherrill.

  • James Hannaham

    Jan 25| Lectures
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    James Hannaham is the author of the novels Delicious Foods, which won the 2016 PEN/Faulkner Award, and God Says No, a Stonewall Honor Book and a Lambda Literary Award finalist.

  • Asher Hartman is an interdisciplinary artist, playwright and director whose work at the junction of visual art and theater centers on the exploration of the self in relation to Western histories and ideologies. 

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Types of Sources and Information

Identifying the intended audience for information is one step in evaluating sources. The descriptions of types of information below can apply equally to periodicals, books, and web pages. Use this in your annotations. See also CRAAP Detection.

Academic, Scholarly, Peer Reviewed

  • Articles written by scholars or researchers in the field, often faculty with Ph.Ds
  • Almost always lists sources and/or includes a bibliography
  • Reports on original research or experimentation
  • Often published by a university press, research center or academic association
  • May contain visual information including charts and graphs that is appropriate and specific to the field and discipline.
  • May be scholarly because of the credentials of the writers, but targeted towards students, such as an encyclopedia
  • Not usually available on a newsstand
  • Examples of periodicals: Fashion Theory, Domus, Art History, Art Bulletin, Journal of the American Medical Association
     

Industry /Trade / Professional Publications

(sometimes referred to as "Professional")

  • Written for (and usually by) people in an industry or field rather than a university professor
  • Assumes knowledge of the field
  • Not usually available on the newsstand
  • Only sometimes lists sources or includes bibliography
  • Often published by a professional association
  • Examples of periodicals: American Libraries, Playthings, Communication Arts, Animation Magazine
     

Substantive News

  • Often glossy in appearance with color illustrations
  • Sometimes list sources or includes bibliography
  • Usually available on the newsstand
  • Articles usually have a named author/s
  • Level of writing geared to educated or well-read audience
  • Examples of periodicals: National Geographic, Art in America, Artforum, Wall Street Journal, Discover
     

Popular

  • Easily purchased on newsstands, bookstores or available for free via the Internet
  • Geared towards general audiences
  • Articles written by staff writers or freelance writers 
  • Slick or glossy (in print version), with lots of advertising
  • Seldom includes list of sources 
  • Examples of periodicals: People, Sports Illustrated, Vogue, Rolling Stone
     

Sensational

  • Variety of styles, but often newspaper format when in print
  • Language is elementary and occasionally inflammatory or sensational
  • Often unsigned
  • Purpose is to arouse curiosity and to cater to popular superstitions
  • Flashy headlines designed to astonish
  • Examples of periodicals/websites: National Enquirer, Star, some Yahoo News