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Events
  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring Matthew Brandt, a Los Angeles-based artist. Read more about him here.
    Contact: Soo Kim, skim@otis.edu
  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring Kerry Tribe, an artist working primarily in film, video, and installation. Read more about her here
     
    Contact: Soo Kim, skim@otis.edu
  • You are invited to a Movies that Matter Special Screening of the powerful new film shaping the debate about rape on college campuses, The Hunting Ground, on Tuesday, September 15 at 7:15 PM in the Otis Forum.  The Hunting Ground is a startling exposé of sexual assaults on U.S. colleges, institutional cover-ups and the brutal social toll on the victims and their families from the Academy Award-nominated filmmaking team of Kirby Dick and Amy Ziering.
  • Otis Books is pleased to publish Tim Erickson’s debut collection of poetry, Egopolis, a textual journey through destruction, resistance, city, and the Ego, from ancient times to the present day. Erickson’s work has appeared in the Chicago Review, Western Humanities Review, and the Salt Anthology of New Writing. He lives in Salt Lake City.

  • The Architecture/Landscape/Interiors Department at OTIS College of Art and Design is pleased to announce a lecture by 

  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring Hassan Khan, an artist who lives and works in Cairo, Egypt. Read more about him here.

     

    Contact: Soo Kim, skim@otis.edu

  • Otis Graduate Writing students will read from their works-in-progress.

O-Tube

Marlena Donohue: 2007-08 Faculty Development Grant Report


Report:

As critic and scholar particularly interested in the 60s as that crucible epoch that gives rise to counter culture and Feminism, I was invited to attend as a critic and correspondent to the Monitor in Boston, the major Beat retrospective at the Whitney Museum in 1995 titled, "Beat Culture and the New America, 1950-1965."

I attended the Press opening and a variety of lectures and was drawn immediately to a brilliantly painted, very eccentric oil of a famous strip joint in North Beach executed by an artist named Michael Bowen; I had no knowledge of this artist and this shocked me.

Beat Culture and the New America 1950-1965

Cover of the exhibition catalog, Beat Culture and the New America, 1950-1965

I am widely familiar with almost all Beat work done in the early 50s in Los Angeles and then in the late 50s and 60s in San Francisco. I had not seen this very fine work before. Another of Bowen’s paintings was in fact used to illustrate the Time magazine review of the exhibition.

I was further intrigued after having been invited to a press lecture at the Whitney where this rather raving artist spoke with vivid and historically accurate anecdotal detail about his intense and long term contacts with seminal figures of the 60s both in Los Angeles and in San Francisco: Tim Leary; William S. Burroughs, Allen Ginsberg, Edward Kienholz, John McCracken, Allan Cohen, the poet Ferlinghetti. The more interesting fact to me was that Michael Bowen’s name reoccurred in passing in ephemera of the era, like letters by and within the inner circle of Beat culture, but neither his work nor his art were in any official historical record of the Beat generation.