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  • Adam Linder is a choreographer based between Berlin and Los Angeles, working both in theatre and visual art contexts. He has been developing a dance based  format he calls Choreographic Services since 2013. This aspect of his work is focused on underscoring real time and economic conditions that are integral to the discipline of  choreography. At Otis Linder will introduce this format both conceptually and practically, discussing why 'servicing' is the relevant way for his work to publicly engage.  




    SCREENING AND CONVERSATION with Margaret Prescod, Founder, Black Coalition Fighting Back Serial Murders and host of “Sojourner Truth” on Pacifica Radio’s KPFK.
    Nana Gyamfi, Lawyer-Black Lives Matter, Black Coalition Fighting Back Serial Murders.

  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring Oliver Payne, a Los Angeles-based artist. Read more about him here.
    Contact: Soo Kim, skim@otis.edu
  • Kimberli Meyer trained as an architect and an artist, and has been the director of the MAK Center for Art and Architecture at the Schindler House in West Hollywood since 2002. She has initiated and curated many programs there, including the exhibitions How Many Billboards?

  • Industry Spotlight

    Oct 15| Special Event

    An advertising creative director for more than 25 years, Otis alumnus Josh Weltman was the Mad Men co-producer responsible for Don Draper's credibility as an advertising genius.


    Join us for a behind-the-scenes look at the hit series, plus hear key insights from Weltman's new book Seducing Strangers: How to Get People to Buy What You're Selling.


    October 15, 6:30 - 9:30 pm

  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring Yutaka Makino. He lives and works in Berlin.  Read more about him here.
    Contact: Soo Kim, skim@otis.edu
  • Susan Choi’s first novel, The Foreign Student, won the Asian-American Literary Award for fiction, and her second novel, American Woman, was a finalist for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize. Her most recent novel, A Person of Interest, was a finalist for the 2009 PEN/Faulkner Award. With David Remnick she co-edited the anthology Wonderful Town: New York Stories from The New Yorker. A recipient of fellowships from the NEA and the Guggenheim Foundation, and in 2010, the inaugural winner of the PEN/W.G. Sebald Award, Choi lives in Brooklyn.


Maura Bendett: 2011-12 Faculty Development Grant Report

Project Description:

In Fall 2011 I received a Faculty Development Grant to purchase a MIG welder to fabricate my sculptures. I also received funds to purchase umbrella lights/stands, a seamless backdrop, and a tripod, which have enabled me to take professional quality photographs of my art. Additionally, I obtained financial support to buy two ceiling lighting fixtures for my studio.


Receiving this grant helped me in my studio practice in multiple ways. It has made it possible for me to weld my sculpture at my studio, instead of having to drive, with my sculpture, to another location to use borrowed welding equipment (#1, #2, #3, welded sculptures in various stages of production).

I have used the umbrella lighting system/seamless backdrop/tripod to shoot photos of my current work for professional activities. I have also been able to photograph several older sculptures that have been taking up space on my studio walls for a year (#4, light stands/umbrellas and installer Tom Villa hanging my ceiling lights). Afterwards, I moved the older sculptures into storage, thus creating additional walls on which to hang my current work.

However, the biggest impact so far has been the installation of the two new overhead ceiling lighting fixtures, (#5, both light fixtures installed and separated by a skylight). They have made a huge difference in the environment at my studio. Their bright light made it apparent to me that my studio desperately needed to be repainted (#6, #7, #8). One of the walls, a 14' brick wall, had never even been painted all the way up to the ceiling (#9). Because the new ceiling lights illuminated absolutely everything, down to the smallest detail, my studio looked much dirtier than I realized. As a result, I was inspired to bring my studio up to speed. Subsequently, I spent four exhausting days repainting the walls (#10, #11, repainting in progress). You can clearly see the difference in the before and after pictures. I also did some major spring-cleaning at the same time. At the present I feel my studio looks amazing (#12).

Value to Otis:

Now that my workspace projects a professional demeanor, I look forward to bringing my current Otis summer elective class, "Experimental Painting", (as well as future classes) to my studio for a field trip. I have also begun using my new photo equipment to create a power point presentation of my sculptures and drawings to show to my Principles of Design classes this fall. Neither of these projects would have been possible before without a Faculty Development Grant to acquire new equipment.


It is vital to have a brightly lit and well-organized studio and work environment in order to create, maintain, and project a professional atmosphere. This is because as a professional artist I need to entertain studio visits from gallerists and curators, photograph and market images of my work, and to easily produce my sculptures. The Otis Faculty Development Grant has greatly enhanced my ability to accomplish these endeavors, and has been instrumental in helping me to strive to achieve my highest potential so far (#13, #14, #15, #16).

--Maura Bendett

Read Full Report [PDF]

Ill. #12: Maura Bendett's Studio
Ill. #12: Maura Bendett's Studio

Work (ill. #15)
Ill. #15: Work by Maura Bendett