Events
  • Sitting in Sound

    Jul 15| Special Event
    More

    Image: Electronic Sound Bath
     

  • L: Nora Jane Slade, Kate Mouse Mickey Moss, 2014, Photo transfer and fabric paint on sweatshirt, cardboard and found objects. R: Marisa Takal, I Love My Sister, 2016, Oil on canvas, 65 x 50 inches.

    Opening Reception: I Wish I Was a Telephone: Nora Jane Slade and Marisa Takal

    Celebrate the opening of the two-person exhibition of work by Los Angeles-based artists Nora Jane Slade and Marisa Takal.

    Light snacks and refreshments.

    Exhibition on view July 15 - August 19, 2017.

  • Amelia Gray is the author of the short story collections AM/PM, Museum of the Weird, and Gutshot, as well as the novels Threats and, most recently, Isadora, published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. Her fiction and essays have appeared in The New Yorker, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Tin House, and VICE. She is winner of the New York Public Library Young Lions Award, of FC2's Ronald Sukenick Innovative Fiction Prize, and a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award. 

  • Image: BijaRi, On the rooftops of Santa Domingo-Savio neighborhood as part of the project Contando con Nosotros, 2011

    Opening Reception 3-5pm /  Curator and Artist led walk-thru of the exhibition, 3pm  /  Free

  • Talking to Action

    Sep 17| Exhibition
    More

    Image: Eduardo Molinari, Confluencia 2: Los Angeles River, 2016.

    Talking to Action: Art, Pedagogy, and Activism in the Americas is an exhibition and bilingual publication that investigates contemporary, community-based social art practices in the Americas. Talking to Action is part of the Getty’s initiative Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA, a far-reaching and ambitious exploration of Latin American and Latino art in dialogue with Los Angeles.
     

  • Luis J. Rodriguez was Los Angeles Poet Laureate from 2014-2016. The twenty-fifth edition of his first book, Poems Across the Pavement, won a 2015 Paterson Award for Sustained Literary Achievement. He has written fourteen other books of poetry, children’s literature, fiction, and nonfiction, including the best-selling memoir Always Running: La Vida Loca: Gang Days in L.A. Rodriguez is also founding editor of Tia Chucha Press and co-founder of Tia Chucha’s Centro Cultural & Bookstore in the San Fernando Valley. In 2016 Tia Chucha Press produced the largest anthology of L.A.-area poets, Coiled Serpent: Poets Arising from the Cultural Quakes & Shifts of Los Angeles. Rodriguez’s last memoir It Calls You Back: An Odyssey Through Love, Addiction, Revolutions, and Healing was a finalist for the 2012 National Book Critics Circle Award. His latest poetry collection Borrowed Bones appeared in 2016 from Curbstone Books/Northwestern University Press.

  • Raised in Philadelphia, with roots in South Africa and Trinidad, Zinzi Clemmons’ writing has appeared in Zoetrope: All-Story, Transition, The Paris Review Daily, and elsewhere. She has received fellowships and support from the MacDowell Colony, Bread Loaf, the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, and the Kimbilio Center for African American Fiction. She is co-founder and former Publisher of Apogee Journal, and a Contributing Editor to LitHub. She teaches literature and creative writing at the Colburn Conservatory and Occidental College. Her debut novel, What We Lose, as well as a second title, are forthcoming from Viking.

O-Tube

Lorenzo Hurtado Segovia ('07 MFA)

Jan 22, 2014
LA Times Review
Spotlight Category: Alumni

Art review: Faculty member Lorenzo Hurtado Segovia weaves a colorful landscape

Critic's Choice December 19, 2013 |By David Pagel

Last year, Lorenzo Hurtado Segovia exhibited a series of dazzling abstractions that he had made by shredding works on paper into long, skinny strips and then weaving the strips into place-mat-style paintings that simultaneously evoked digital transmissions on the fritz, plaid fabrics stretched by swinging hips and banners flapping in the wind.

This year, in a breakout exhibition at CB1 Gallery, Hurtado Segovia expands the range and intensifies the impact of his ingenious works. Making a mess of distinctions between painting and sculpture, not to mention art and craft, the L.A. artist who was born in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, invites visitors into a world where nothing sits still — least of all, your imagination.

The high-ceilinged main gallery is one part enchanted forest and one part holy chapel. Not one of its 21 works hangs on the wall, like a painting, or takes up much space, like a traditional sculpture. Yet you’re bathed in color. And you’ll want to walk around each piece, so as not to miss the golden glow that reflects off a huge woven work suspended in midair and the gorgeous rainbow of tertiary tints that leaps from the 18 freestanding dowels, some 12 feet tall, that Hurtado Segovia has wrapped in colorful cords ordinarily used to weave rugs.

A side gallery includes fewer pieces but no less drama. Three two-sided woven paper pieces, set atop elegant pedestals, revel in the pleasure, and the power, of asymmetry. On the back wall, a big painting similarly celebrates illogic, inconsistency, impossibility. Part interior, part landscape and part street scene, it takes its place in a sophisticated exhibition that makes room for life’s multilayered richness without taking up much space or wasting a minute.

CB1 Gallery, 207 W. 5th St., (213) 806-7889, through Jan. 26. Closed Mondays and Tuesdays. www.cb1gallery.com

Tags