Events
  • Sitting in Sound

    Jul 15| Special Event
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    Image: Electronic Sound Bath
     

  • L: Nora Jane Slade, Kate Mouse Mickey Moss, 2014, Photo transfer and fabric paint on sweatshirt, cardboard and found objects. R: Marisa Takal, I Love My Sister, 2016, Oil on canvas, 65 x 50 inches.

    Opening Reception: I Wish I Was a Telephone: Nora Jane Slade and Marisa Takal

    Celebrate the opening of the two-person exhibition of work by Los Angeles-based artists Nora Jane Slade and Marisa Takal.

    Light snacks and refreshments.

    Exhibition on view July 15 - August 19, 2017.

  • Amelia Gray is the author of the short story collections AM/PM, Museum of the Weird, and Gutshot, as well as the novels Threats and, most recently, Isadora, published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. Her fiction and essays have appeared in The New Yorker, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Tin House, and VICE. She is winner of the New York Public Library Young Lions Award, of FC2's Ronald Sukenick Innovative Fiction Prize, and a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award. 

  • Image: BijaRi, On the rooftops of Santa Domingo-Savio neighborhood as part of the project Contando con Nosotros, 2011

    Opening Reception 3-5pm /  Curator and Artist led walk-thru of the exhibition, 3pm  /  Free

  • Talking to Action

    Sep 17| Exhibition
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    Image: Eduardo Molinari, Confluencia 2: Los Angeles River, 2016.

  • Luis J. Rodriguez was Los Angeles Poet Laureate from 2014-2016. The twenty-fifth edition of his first book, Poems Across the Pavement, won a 2015 Paterson Award for Sustained Literary Achievement. He has written fourteen other books of poetry, children’s literature, fiction, and nonfiction, including the best-selling memoir Always Running: La Vida Loca: Gang Days in L.A. Rodriguez is also founding editor of Tia Chucha Press and co-founder of Tia Chucha’s Centro Cultural & Bookstore in the San Fernando Valley. In 2016 Tia Chucha Press produced the largest anthology of L.A.-area poets, Coiled Serpent: Poets Arising from the Cultural Quakes & Shifts of Los Angeles. Rodriguez’s last memoir It Calls You Back: An Odyssey Through Love, Addiction, Revolutions, and Healing was a finalist for the 2012 National Book Critics Circle Award. His latest poetry collection Borrowed Bones appeared in 2016 from Curbstone Books/Northwestern University Press.

  • Raised in Philadelphia, with roots in South Africa and Trinidad, Zinzi Clemmons’ writing has appeared in Zoetrope: All-Story, Transition, The Paris Review Daily, and elsewhere. She has received fellowships and support from the MacDowell Colony, Bread Loaf, the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, and the Kimbilio Center for African American Fiction. She is co-founder and former Publisher of Apogee Journal, and a Contributing Editor to LitHub. She teaches literature and creative writing at the Colburn Conservatory and Occidental College. Her debut novel, What We Lose, as well as a second title, are forthcoming from Viking.

O-Tube

Celebrating The Woman's Building on International Women's Day

In Conversation with Sue Maberry

"Women are powerful, incredible artists with a lot to say."

International Women’s Day is a movement to celebrate the achievements of women and be a force for a more inclusive, gender equal world. Perhaps one of the greatest success stories of creating space, community, and equality for female artists can be found in the Woman's Building. From its founding in 1973 to its closing in 1991, the Woman’s Building was a potent symbol of women’s creative community. Its exhibitions, performances, readings, lectures, public projects, and educational programs inspired and fostered generations of women artists, writers, performers, and scholars.

Sue Maberry, Director of Library and Instructional Technology at Otis College of Art and Design, was a project director at the Women's Building and has been actively involved in preserving its history. Currently a member of the Woman's Building Board of Directors, she recently participated in the Woman’s Building: Animating the Archives panel at the L.A. Art Book Fair and was featured by KCET in the spotlight piece The Woman’s Building: L.A.’s “Feminist Mecca.”

Maberry was also vital in the development of Doin' It in Public: Feminism and Art at the Woman's Building presented by Otis College's Ben Maltz Gallery in 2011. The exhibition sought to document, contextualize and pay tribute to the groundbreaking work of feminist artists and art cooperatives that were centered in and around the Woman's Building in the 1970s and 1980s. Doin' It In Public was part of the Pacific Standard Time: Art in LA 1945-1980 collaboration, initiated by the Getty, to tell the story of the birth of the L.A. art scene. Doin' It In Public was the first exhibition to fully explore the contributions of the Woman’s Building and included capturing the oral history through commissioned interviews with prominent artists and leaders of the movement including Sheila de Bretteville, Terry Wolverton, Suzanne Lacy, Mother Art, The Waitresses, and many others.

To celebrate International Women's Day, we asked Maberry about her time at the Woman's Building and how its tradition is being carried on by a new generation. 

 

How did you first become involved with the Woman’s Building?

It was 1976, and I was in college taking art and women’s studies classes. I found out about the Woman's Building through the New Woman’s Survival Catalog and immediately knew I had to be there.

 

Is there something you learned during your time there that you still carry with you?

That art makes a difference in people’s lives and culture. That women are powerful, incredible artists with a lot to say.

 

How important is documenting and archiving these stories and works in ensuring female artists are given parity in art history classes and museum walls?

Just as the original Woman’s Building of 1893 was lost to history for 70 years until Judy Chicago and her students discovered the catalog in a second-hand bookstore, the Woman’s Building founded in 1973 was almost lost to history. So much of what is exciting nowadays owes much to the creativity and persistence of all our foremothers. I am very grateful to Otis for supporting the online database which began in 1997 as part of the Getty Information Institute's "Faces of L.A." Project. More than 1500 images documenting both featured artists and their projects were selected and digitized. Then in 2011, Otis supported Doin' It in Public: Feminism and Art at the Woman's Building curated by Meg Linton and funded by the Getty’s the Pacific Standard Time initiative. These projects have been incredible in preserving women’s history in the arts. 

 

What does the Women's Building seek to achieve today and how can people become involved with the organization?

We exist now only to preserve the history. Metabolic Studio discovered the Woman’s Building and became interested in archiving the history. Through their grant, we are able to fund emerging women artists who want to create new work that “animates the archives.” The resulting work, accompanied by several events, will be on exhibit at Avenue 50 Studio, 131 North Avenue 50, Highland Park, CA 90042, from Saturday, May 13 through Saturday, June 3, 2017.

 

The work that came out of the Woman’s Building has informed many contemporary feminist and social justice artists, do you think that the Woman’s Building could be revived by a new generation?

In a sense, the Woman's Building accomplished many of its goals. Women artists are visible and important contributors to art and culture now. But many young women are still hungry for spaces where they can network and collaborate and discuss issues. The Women’s Center for Creative Work is a not-for-profit organization that cultivates L.A.’s feminist creative communities and practices. I see them as one group carrying on the tradition of the Woman's Building. They are doing great work and it’s appropriate for this generation to define and create organizations that support their needs now.

 

To learn more about the Woman's Building, visit www.womansbuilding.org. The Doin' It In Public: Feminism and Art at the Woman's Building exhibition catalog is available for purchase through Amazon.

 

KCET's The Woman’s Building: L.A.’s “Feminist Mecca”.

Image: Group of women from the Feminist Studio Workshop pose while making a banner that reads The Art of Community, 1979. Photo: Florence Rosen

 

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