• Todd Gray

    Oct 25| Lectures

    Todd Gray was born in 1954 in Los Angeles. Gray received an MFA and a BFA from California Institute of the Arts and is currently a professor at California State University, Long Beach. He has shown performance work at REDCAT (Roy and Edna Disney CalArts Theater), Los Angeles (2010); California African American Museum, Los Angeles (2009); the Commons, New York University (2008); 18th Street Arts Center, Santa Monica (2008); New Renaissance Theater, Syracuse, NY (2007); and Academy of Media Arts, Cologne (2004).

  • Ruby Neri is a sculptor, painter, and former street artist from San Francisco and Los Angeles, California, known for her evocative portrayal of horses.

  • Otis in NYC
    October 27, 2016 
    6 - 8 pm 
    Franklin Parrasch Gallery
    53 East 64 Street
    New York, NY 10065

    Otis College President Bruce W. Ferguson is coming to NYC! 
    Please come say hello and visit with your fellow alumni and friends of Otis College of Art and Design.
    Drinks and hors d'oeuvres.


  • Lecture takes place at 356 S. Mission Rd., co-presented with Ben Maltz Gallery in conjunction with the exhibition Polly Apfelbaum: Face (Geometry) (Naked) Eyes.

    New York-based critic and independent curator Bob Nickas presents his musings on one hundred paintings, choosing one from each year from 1915-2015.

  • Bob Nickas

    Oct 31| Lectures

    Bob Nickas is a critic and independent curator based in New York, having organized more than ninety exhibitions since 1984.
    He was Curatorial Advisor at P.S.1/MoMA in New York between 2004-07, where his exhibitions include: 
    Lee Lozano: Drawn From Life; 
    William Gedney—Christopher Wool: Into the Night; 
    Stephen Shore: American Surfaces; 
    Wolfgang Tillmans: Freedom From The Known. 

  • Looking at the recent works of Sebastian Stumpf one finds an interplay between performance and the recording of performance, between the execution of a physical act and the documentation of it by means of a camera. [He] operates in two distinct realms: in the empty spaces of contemporary art institutions and in urban settings with their preexisting orders. […] An inconspicuous architectural detail suddenly becomes the catalyst for a physical exploit…. The art gallery becomes a space for action.

  • Passionate Voices Expressed in Sound Bearing Plastic: An Evening with Collector Richard Shelton


Whitney BIennial includes Otis alumnus and faculty member

John Mason, Joel Otterson

The Whitney Museum's Biennial opens Friday, March 7, and includes work by alumnus John Mason ('57) and faculty member Joel Otterson. Both artists blur the difference between art and craft.

Mason's abstract clay sculptures completed over the last six decades have contributed to changing the medium. From 1957-1965, Mason focused on exploring the physical properties of clay—its possibilities as well as its limitations, constantly experimenting with plasticity, pushing clay to its technical limits, and developing innovative firing techniques. His tall vertical sculptures, huge wall reliefs, cross forms and geometric shapes explore symmetry, rotation, mass, and the integration of color and form. His interest in primitive art is manifested in the mysterious and totemic quality of many of his works. L.A. art critic Suzanne Muchnic, writing for ArtNews, describes his position:A major figure in ceramic sculpture, Mason emerged in the mid-1950s as one of the leaders of a revolution that transformed clay from a craft to a fine art medium … In his latest work, Mason has proved himself a master builder and sculptor who knows how to get the most out of a relatively simple three-dimensional form.”  As John Coplans writes, “he is not only capable of endowing his massive images with a rich complexity of associative values, but in helping to free ceramics from its long tradition of vessel form and intimate scale he has persuasively demonstrated the flexibility of a hitherto limited material.”


Joel Otterson scours swap meets for found objects that become part of his assemblages. For the past 30 years, he has made sculpture that combines aspects of domestic handicraft with traditional sculptural materials such as copper pipe, woodworking, pottery, porcelain, china, earthenware, concrete, marble, and stained glass. Using quilting, lacemaking, and sewing, traditionally associated with feminine crafts, Joel turns these humble materials into muscular art. He was one of the youngest artists ever selected for a one-person exhibition in the Projects Room of the Museum of Modern Art, N.Y. (1987), and has been included in both the 1993 Venice Biennale, and "Made in L.A," the first California biennial held at the Hammer Museum, L.A. "Brancusi would be one of my favorite artists and influences. I make everything myself. I also love decorative arts, furniture, dinnerware, and architecture, because it’s all about living. My influences are eclectic, and for me it speaks about our “postmodern” world and especially about being American. I am very interested in how an inanimate object can trigger an emotion."




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