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Events
  • Otis Books is pleased to publish Tim Erickson’s debut collection of poetry, Egopolis, a textual journey through destruction, resistance, city, and the Ego, from ancient times to the present day. Erickson’s work has appeared in the Chicago Review, Western Humanities Review, and the Salt Anthology of New Writing. He lives in Salt Lake City.

  • Otis Graduate Writing students will read from their works-in-progress.

  • Exquisite Beauty is the first retrospective and publication to document the eye-dazzling ceramics created by Ralph Bacerra (1938–2008), a Los Angeles–based artist known for his innovative approach to surface embellishment. Curated by Jo Lauria, the exhibition features more than ninety of the artist’s finest pieces—dramatic, highly decorated vessels and sculptures that have never before been the focus of a major exhibition or publication.

  • Opening Reception for Ralph Bacerra: Exquisite Beauty

  • David Treuer is an Ojibwe Indian from Leech Lake Reservation in northern Minnesota and currently teaches at USC. He is the author of the novels Little, The Hiawatha, The Translation of Dr. Apelles, named a Best Book of the Year by the Washington Post, as well as a critical work, Native American Fiction: A User's Manual. In 2012, he published another nonfiction work, Rez Life.

  • Angela Flournoy’s first novel The Turner House was a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection. Her fiction has appeared in The Paris Review, and she has written for The New Republic, The Los Angeles Review of Books and elsewhere. Flournoy has taught at the University of Iowa and Trinity Washington University. She lives in Los Angeles.

  • Susan Choi’s first novel, The Foreign Student, won the Asian-American Literary Award for fiction, and her second novel, American Woman, was a finalist for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize. Her most recent novel, A Person of Interest, was a finalist for the 2009 PEN/Faulkner Award. With David Remnick she co-edited the anthology Wonderful Town: New York Stories from The New Yorker. A recipient of fellowships from the NEA and the Guggenheim Foundation, and in 2010, the inaugural winner of the PEN/W.G. Sebald Award, Choi lives in Brooklyn.

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About Call Numbers

Classification Systems and Call Numbers

The purpose of a library classification system is to bring related material together in way that will help users locate items of interest to them. Library classification systems organize material by broad subject area. Each item is assigned a call number, which is like an address on a street.

Library of Congress Classification System

LC is used by most academic libraries. It was developed in 1901 as a response to the fact that the Library of Congress collection had grown from several thousand volumes to over a million. They formulated the system based on an actual collection of books rather than a theoretical construct.

LC Outline
A General Works B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion C  Auxiliary Sciences of History
D  History (includes Travel) E  America F  United States. Canada. Latin America
G  Geography H  Social Sciences J  Political Science
K  Law L Education M Music
N  Fine Art P  Language & Literature Q Science
R  Medicine S  Agriculture T  Technology
U  Military Science V  Naval Science Z  Books and Bibliographies

For a more detailed description of the LC call numbers most heavily used in the Otis Library, see What the Call Numbers Mean.


Example of an LC Call Number for the following book:
Techno.Seduction: An Exhibition of Multimedia Installation Work by Forty Artists, by Robert Rindler 

N Books about art
6512.5 Specific topic, usually country, time period, or type of art
I56 Further breakdown of topic; in this case, installation art. Often this line is used for the artist or author number.
R56 In this case, this is the author number (Rindler)

 

Dewey Decimal System

The Dewey Classification is used by most public libraries. Melvil Dewey tried to create a system in which all knowledge was theoretically ordered in a logical way. That is, closely related subjects would be near each other. Unfortunately, many new subjects have come into existence since Dewey invented the DDC, causing some problems with this approach. For instance, there were no computers in his time. The only way to expand a Dewey number is through the addition of numbers after the decimal point. The result can be very long and complicated numbers for some subjects.

Dewey Outline
000 General Works 100 Philosophy
200 Religion 300 Social Sciences
400 Languages 500 Pure Science
600 Technology 700 The Arts
800 Literature 900 Geography and History


Example of a Dewey Call Number for the same book listed above:
Techno.Seduction: An Exhibition of Multimedia Installation Work by Forty Artists, by Robert Rindler 

709.73 Subject is art history. The .73 is the sub-category American art and artists.
RIN The first 3 letters of the author's last name (Rindler).


Other Things to Notice About Call Numbers

Look carefully at the call number. It is sometimes preceded on the top line by words such as:

  • Oversize
  • Ref.
  • Sp.Coll.

They designate separate areas within the library where books are located. A staff member will point you in the right direction or retrieve the materials for you. Please ask.