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Events
  • On the Roof

    May 05| Exhibition
    More

    Graduate Fine Arts Final Exhibition featuring work by

    Soo Yun Jun 
    Delia Perez Salinas Tijerina 
    Yasmin Than
    Sean Cully
    Rachel Indergaard 
    Kristy Baltezore 
    Angie Kim 

  • View work by the next generation of creative professionals in

    Architecture/Landscape/Interiors
    Communication Arts: Advertising Design, Graphic Design, Illustration
    Digital Media: Animation, Game & Entertainment Design, Motion Design
    Fashion Design: Costume Design
    Fine Arts: Painting, Photography, Sculpture/New Genres
    Product Design
    Toy Design

    Graduate Fine Arts

  • Welcome to I Hope the Wind Don’t Blow, a look into the nine month process of interactions between a graduate class of eight students of Otis College of Art and Design Graduate Program in Public Practice, and the communities of Sun Village, Littlerock and surrounding areas of Antelope Valley. The presentation begins with a public reception Saturday, May 9, 6-8pm. 
     
  • View work by the next generation of creative professionals in

    Architecture/Landscape/Interiors
    Communication Arts: Advertising Design, Graphic Design, Illustration
    Digital Media: Animation, Game & Entertainment Design, Motion Design
    Fashion Design: Costume Design
    Fine Arts: Painting, Photography, Sculpture/New Genres
    Product Design
    Toy Design

    Graduate Fine Arts

  • CLASS OF 2015 COMMENCEMENT!

    The 2015 Otis Commencement Exercises is scheduled for Sunday, May 10,  2015. The ceremony will be be held at 3:00pm locally at Westchester Park, due to limited space available on campus as a result of the Campus expansion project. More details on Commencment will be emailed to students during the Spring 2015 semester. Please save the date for commencment.

    For questions or comment related to ALL commencement related matters, please contact Mike Luna, Director of Student Activities at (310) 846-2595.

O-Tube

Concept Mapping

LIB mindmap love

A concept map or "mindmap" is a simple way to visually display ideas and relationships among concepts. Creating one can help you organize your ideas and define your topic.



How You Do IT
Concept Mapping tutorial developed by Ellen Petraits at the Rhode Island School of Design  Library
      LIB mindmap 2

Examples
You can create a mindmap of anything!

Right: Interesting mindmap created as a Wikipedia advertisment. Found on Flickr. Click on image to go to the page describing it.

More examples from Flickr

 

The Theory Underlying Concept Maps and How to Construct and Use Them

   Mind Map Chalkboard


Web Tools
There are many mindmapping software packages available.

Bubl Us is free and easy to use.

Mind Meister is good and free for use with limited features. But you have to sign up.

 

   LIB mindmap bubbles


From Wikipedia:

A mind map is a diagram used to represent words, ideas, tasks, or other items linked to and arranged around a central key word or idea. Mind maps are used to generate, visualize, structure, and classify ideas, and as an aid in study, organization, problem solving, decision making, and writing.

The elements of a given mind map are arranged intuitively according to the importance of the concepts, and are classified into groupings, branches, or areas, with the goal of representing semantic or other connections between portions of information. Mind maps may also aid recall of existing memories.

By presenting ideas in a radial, graphical, non-linear manner, mind maps encourage a brainstorming approach to planning and organizational tasks. Though the branches of a mindmap represent hierarchical tree structures, their radial arrangement disrupts the prioritizing of concepts typically associated with hierarchies presented with more linear visual cues. This orientation towards brainstorming encourages users to enumerate and connect concepts without a tendency to begin within a particular conceptual framework.

The mind map can be contrasted with the similar idea of concept mapping. The former is based on radial hierarchies and tree structures denoting relationships with a central governing concept, whereas concept maps are based on connections between concepts in more diverse patterns.