Otis College of Art and Design logo
Events
  • Otis Books is pleased to publish Tim Erickson’s debut collection of poetry, Egopolis, a textual journey through destruction, resistance, city, and the Ego, from ancient times to the present day. Erickson’s work has appeared in the Chicago Review, Western Humanities Review, and the Salt Anthology of New Writing. He lives in Salt Lake City.

  • Otis Graduate Writing students will read from their works-in-progress.

  • Exquisite Beauty is the first retrospective and publication to document the eye-dazzling ceramics created by Ralph Bacerra (1938–2008), a Los Angeles–based artist known for his innovative approach to surface embellishment. Curated by Jo Lauria, the exhibition features more than ninety of the artist’s finest pieces—dramatic, highly decorated vessels and sculptures that have never before been the focus of a major exhibition or publication.

  • Opening Reception for Ralph Bacerra: Exquisite Beauty

  • David Treuer is an Ojibwe Indian from Leech Lake Reservation in northern Minnesota and currently teaches at USC. He is the author of the novels Little, The Hiawatha, The Translation of Dr. Apelles, named a Best Book of the Year by the Washington Post, as well as a critical work, Native American Fiction: A User's Manual. In 2012, he published another nonfiction work, Rez Life.

  • Angela Flournoy’s first novel The Turner House was a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection. Her fiction has appeared in The Paris Review, and she has written for The New Republic, The Los Angeles Review of Books and elsewhere. Flournoy has taught at the University of Iowa and Trinity Washington University. She lives in Los Angeles.

  • Susan Choi’s first novel, The Foreign Student, won the Asian-American Literary Award for fiction, and her second novel, American Woman, was a finalist for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize. Her most recent novel, A Person of Interest, was a finalist for the 2009 PEN/Faulkner Award. With David Remnick she co-edited the anthology Wonderful Town: New York Stories from The New Yorker. A recipient of fellowships from the NEA and the Guggenheim Foundation, and in 2010, the inaugural winner of the PEN/W.G. Sebald Award, Choi lives in Brooklyn.

O-Tube

Types of Information

Identifying the intended audience for information is one step in evaluating information. The descriptions of types of information below can apply equally to periodicals, books, and web pages. Use this in your annotations. See also CRAAP Detection.

Academic, Scholarly, Peer Reviewed

  • Articles written by scholars or researchers in the field, often faculty with Ph.Ds
  • Almost always lists sources and/or includes a bibliography
  • Reports on original research or experimentation
  • Often published by a university press, research center or academic association
  • May contain visual information including charts and graphs that is appropriate and specific to the field and discipline.
  • May be scholarly because of the credentials of the writers, but targeted towards students, such as an encyclopedia
  • Not usually available on a newsstand
  • Examples of periodicals: Fashion Theory, Domus, Art History, Art Bulletin, Journal of the American Medical Association
     

Industry /Trade / Professional Publications

(sometimes referred to as "Professional")

  • Written for (and usually by) people in an industry or field rather than a university professor
  • Assumes knowledge of the field
  • Not usually available on the newsstand
  • Only sometimes lists sources or includes bibliography
  • Often published by a professional association
  • Examples of periodicals: American Libraries, Playthings, Communication Arts, Animation Magazine
     

Substantive News

  • Often glossy in appearance with color illustrations
  • Sometimes list sources or includes bibliography
  • Usually available on the newsstand
  • Articles usually have a named author/s
  • Level of writing geared to educated or well-read audience
  • Examples of periodicals: National Geographic, Art in America, Artforum, Wall Street Journal, Discover
     

Popular

  • Easily purchased on newsstands, bookstores or available for free via the Internet
  • Geared towards general audiences
  • Articles written by staff writers or freelance writers 
  • Slick or glossy (in print version), with lots of advertising
  • Seldom includes list of sources 
  • Examples of periodicals: People, Sports Illustrated, Vogue, Rolling Stone
     

Sensational

  • Variety of styles, but often newspaper format when in print
  • Language is elementary and occasionally inflammatory or sensational
  • Often unsigned
  • Purpose is to arouse curiosity and to cater to popular superstitions
  • Flashy headlines designed to astonish
  • Examples of periodicals/websites: National Enquirer, Star, some Yahoo News