Events
  • Mining fields like education, cinema, psychology, literature and art history Anna Craycroft examines cultural models for fostering individuality. Through drawings, paintings, videos, sculptures, furniture, installations, books, workshops, or curatorial projects she works thematically on a single thesis over a series of exhibitions.

  • In his lecture, Laurence Rickels reenters the exchange between Walter Benjamin and Alexander Mette, which led to Mette’s review of Ursprung des deutschen Trauerspiels in Imago and brought Benjamin to consider the clinical picture of schizophrenia, the topic of Mette’s dissertation-book, which he in turn reviewed.

  • Artist Anna Craycroft, of the current exhibition Tuning the Room in Ben Maltz Gallery, in discussion with artist and curator Micah Silver.

  • Emily Thorpe's art work addresses the twisting formation of memory through spatial relations and moments of domesticity. She will be presenting a solo exhibition for her Graduate Thesis at The Bolsky Gallery, Otis College of Art & Design, on view February 20 to February 25, 2017. There will be a closing reception on Saturday, February 25, 6-9pm.

  • Solmaz Sharif

    Mar 01| Lectures
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    Solmaz Sharif’s first collection, Look, was recently published by Graywolf Press and is a 2016 National Book Award finalist. Her poetry has appeared in the New Republic, Granta, Poetry, and other journals. Her first collection, Look, was recently published by Graywolf Press. A former Stegner Fellow, she is currently a lecturer at Stanford University and lives in the Bay Area.

  • Brendan Folwer was born 1978, Berkeley, California and lives and works in Los Angeles. His solo exhibitions include New Portraits (2017), Richard Telles Fine Art, Los Angeles, Portraits (2016), Mathew, New York and New Pictures, Six Sampler Works, and Benches (2015), Richard Telles Fine Art, Los Angeles.

O-Tube

Boolean Logic for Better Searching

"Computers are useless. They can only give you answers." --Pablo Picasso

Computerized search mechanisms are based on Boolean logic. When you use the enter code words known as boolean operators you are telling the computer exactly how to perform a search which will be tailored to your specific needs.

The most commonly used code words are: AND, OR, and NOT. The phrase you enter into a search box is called the search string (or syntax)

Here are some diagrams to help explain the effects of these operators.

AND
This operator combines the individual words (terms) in order to create a more specific search.

It actually NARROWS your search.

Possible search strings (or syntax):

cats AND dogs

Some search engines use a plus (+) sign instead of the word AND.

+Cats +dogs 

boolean AND diagram

 

 

OR
This operator combines possible synonyms of the individual words in order to create a wider search.

It actually BROADENS your search.

Possible search strings (or syntax):

films OR movies OR motion pictures

 

boolean OR diagram

 

 

NOT 
This operator limits (reduces) your search results by excluding specific terms.

It actually NARROWS, in a very specific way, your search.

Possible search string (syntax):

dolphins NOT football

Some search engines use the minus sign (-) instead of the word NOT.

+Dolphins -football

boolean NOT diagram

Different search engines incorporate Boolean logic in different ways, but they all use it. Some assume AND, some OR. It is important to read the instructions for each search engine before entering your search terms. Info People publishes a nice search engine comparison guide which shows the differences in Boolean syntax used in the different engines: http://infopeople.org/search/chart.html

The use of quotation marks or parenthesis around phrases is a handy device to cause the computer to search for the exact phrase. For instance:

  • "American Beauty"
  • "computer graphics artist"
  • (motion pictures)

 

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