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Events
  • You are invited to a Movies that Matter Special Screening of the powerful new film shaping the debate about rape on college campuses, The Hunting Ground, on Tuesday, September 15 at 7:15 PM in the Otis Forum.  The Hunting Ground is a startling exposé of sexual assaults on U.S. colleges, institutional cover-ups and the brutal social toll on the victims and their families from the Academy Award-nominated filmmaking team of Kirby Dick and Amy Ziering.
  • Otis Books is pleased to publish Tim Erickson’s debut collection of poetry, Egopolis, a textual journey through destruction, resistance, city, and the Ego, from ancient times to the present day. Erickson’s work has appeared in the Chicago Review, Western Humanities Review, and the Salt Anthology of New Writing. He lives in Salt Lake City.

  • The Architecture/Landscape/Interiors Department at OTIS College of Art and Design is pleased to announce a lecture by 

  • Otis Graduate Writing students will read from their works-in-progress.

  • Exquisite Beauty is the first retrospective and publication to document the eye-dazzling ceramics created by Ralph Bacerra (1938–2008), a Los Angeles–based artist known for his innovative approach to surface embellishment. Curated by Jo Lauria, the exhibition features more than ninety of the artist’s finest pieces—dramatic, highly decorated vessels and sculptures that have never before been the focus of a major exhibition or publication.

  • Opening Reception for Ralph Bacerra: Exquisite Beauty

  • Sunday, September 27, 2pm, Free
    Symposium: Centered on Clay

    Keynote speaker: Kathy Butterly
    East Los Angeles College | Rosco C Ingalls Auditorium | 1301 Avenida Cesar Chavez, Monterey Park, CA 91754 | 323.265.8650


    A symposium in conjunction with the exhibition Ralph Bacerra: Exquisite Beauty
    September 26 – December 6, 2015

O-Tube

Boolean Logic for Better Searching

"Computers are useless. They can only give you answers." --Pablo Picasso

Computers can be very effective tools to locate information, but they are ONLY machines. Computer output depends upon human input.

Computerized search mechanisms are based on Boolean logic. When you use the enter code words known as boolean operators you are telling the computer exactly how to perform a search which will be tailored to your specific needs.

The most commonly used code words are: AND, OR, and NOT. The phrase you enter into a search box is called the search string (or syntax)

Here are some diagrams to help explain the effects of these operators.

 

AND
This operator combines the individual words (terms) in order to create a more specific search.

It actually NARROWS your search.

Possible search strings (or syntax):

cats AND dogs

Some search engines use a plus (+) sign instead of the word AND.

+Cats +dogs 

boolean AND diagram

 

 

OR
This operator combines possible synonyms of the individual words in order to create a wider search.

It actually BROADENS your search.

Possible search strings (or syntax):

films OR movies OR motion pictures

 

boolean OR diagram

 

 

 

NOT 
This operator limits (reduces) your search results by excluding specific terms.

It actually NARROWS, in a very specific way, your search.

Possible search string (syntax):

dolphins NOT football

Some search engines use the minus sign (-) instead of the word NOT.

+Dolphins -football

boolean NOT diagram

Different search engines incorporate Boolean logic in different ways, but they all use it. Some assume AND, some OR. It is important to read the instructions for each search engine before entering your search terms. Info People publishes a nice search engine comparison guide which shows the differences in Boolean syntax used in the different engines: http://infopeople.org/search/chart.html

The use of quotation marks or parenthesis around phrases is a handy device to cause the computer to search for the exact phrase. For instance:

  • "American Beauty"
  • "computer graphics artist"
  • (motion pictures)