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Events
  • Join us for the ultimate genre mash up as we drop the best hip hop and underground hiphop from all over as well as some of the freshest hard hitting electronic music out today. Presented by DJ Chewby (Pamela Torzan), DJ Snowden (Ryan Snowden) Daybid 1X (David Namkoong), and 90’s Kid (Danial Siddiqui) of the Otis Radio class.

     

  • Come enjoy the awesomeness of Soundtracks from Games, Movies and TV Shows with DJ Tea Time (Joshua Timmons), DJ SurgeMiester (Sergio Betancourt ) and DJ ForGrapeJelly (Steven Escarcega).

     

  • Fine Arts presents a lecture by painter Mary Weatherford. She received her BA from Princeton and MFA from Bard. Weatherford has shown at David Kordansky Gallery in L.A., LAxART in L.A., Brennan & Griffin in New York, and Debs & Co in New York.  In addition, her work is included in collections of MoMA, LACMA, Hammer Museum, Museum of Contemporary Art in San Diego, and OCMA.
    All are welcome
    Series organized by Photography Director Soo Kim
  • Cesar Garcia – Director and Chief Curator, The Mistake Room
    Glenn Kaino – contemporary artist
    Kris Kuramitsu – Deputy Director and Senior Curator, The Mistake Room

    In conjunction with Otis’ Creative Action program, Big City Forum presents a series of four discussions featuring individuals who reinvent social space and redefine how we engage with each other.

  • “Foregrounds” is a show exploring how we listen to sounds. It utilizes field recordings by blending songs and spoken word pieces with the soundscapes in which we listen to them – whether it be played along with Los Angeles traffic, the sound of a meal being prepared, or waves at the beach. Presented by DJ Derek (Corn), DJ Nasera (Alayon), DJ Max (Miles) of the Otis Radio class.

     

  • HOT & HE∆VY

    Apr 28| Special Event
    More

     

  • Tour I: Artists Studios

    May 03| Continuing Education
    More

    Fee: $75
    In conjunction with Freeway Studies #2: Inside the Quad

    Curators Meg Linton and Jeseca Dawson lead a tour of artists studios located "inside the quad." Tour includes transportation, lunch, and snacks.

O-Tube

Cultural Studies

Step 1:

If you need to learn the basics of research, visit the Research HowTos section for tutorials covering various aspects of using the Otis library and research tools.

Step 2:

One place to begin your research is to get a broad overview of of your topic. Try one of Otis's online subscription encyclopedias or dictionaries such as the Oxford English Dictionary or World Folklore and Folklife. Just finding the history or origins or words like tattoo or Eucharist could generate many ideas for projects. Note: You will need to think of alternative terms for your subject. For instance, when you don't find lowriders, try  low ridersautomobileshot rods, or  car culture.

Sometimes you may have to turn to actual books for the best information. You might be pleasantly surprised to discover a wealth of valuable, reliable, and academically-oriented material there. Here are four specialized encyclopedias to get you started:

Located in the Reference Section

GR
550
A77
 
Folk and Fairy Tales: A Handbook 
GR
35
F63
 
Folklore: An Encyclopedia of Beliefs, Customs, Tales, Music, and Art
GT
4803
F65
 
Folklore of American Holidays
E
169.1
H2643
 
Handbook of American Popular Culture
E
184
A1
G14
 
Gale Encyclopedia of Multicultural America
BL
304
D577
 
Myth: A Handbook

Step 3:

Definitely try the OPAC (Library Catalog). Do a keyword search first to get an overview of what books are in the Otis Library, if any. Use only one word at a time and then try different searches using synonyms or related words. Through the OPAC, you may also discover alternate terms that you can use in searching other larger databases.

Step 4:

Find a journal article or two. Start with OmniFile. It's a new database at Otis and has full-text for thousands of magazines and journals covering the area of folklore among other areas. Try a keyword search. If you get too many hits, limit the results to a subject search. Some of your results will be bibliographic citations to journals that Otis Library does not carry. If you want to check our holdings click on this link to the Magazine Holdings List. If Otis doesn't have it, you may be able to find it through another library. If you want to limit your results to only those results for which the full-text is available online, there is a button for that function on the top of the Wilson Omni results page.

Check out the Databases page for more resources.

Step 5:

Search for a content-rich academic/educational websites. Pages ending in .org or .edu may be the best ones, but make sure the author is not a student doing a class assignment or that the page is not simply a course syllabus.

Unless you know exactly what you want to find and are clear on synonyms and alternative terms, you may want to try a directory like ipl2. As search engines go, this is an extremely tiny one. However, each website listed has been carefully selected and reviewed. You'll retrieve the best of the web with the infomercials and junk will be filtered out. Another good directory to scholarly web resources is Infomine. Check out our page on other search engines.

Put in a very broad term like folklore or myth or popular culture. You'll probably get several websites which may, in fact, be free databases that you can browse for ideas. It's a fascinating, but focused way to learn about subjects new to you.

Step 6:

Your instructors will ask that you create a bibliography using the Chicago or MLA Style. Here's a page that covers citing: Citing Sources. Be aware that citing web sources and online databases requires you to indicate the date you accessed it and the name of the provider of the database.

Also, paste your paper into Grammarly.It wiill help you to make sure nothing is plagiarized.

Remember: Librarians are your friends. Ask for reference assistance at any time...