Otis College of Art and Design logo
Events
  • Nancy Lupo

    Apr 21| Lectures
    More

    Nancy Lupo is a Los Angeles based artist who has attended Flagstaff Arts and Leadership Academy, Pratt Institute, Cooper Union School for the Advancement of Science and Art, and École Nationale Superiérieur des Beaux-Arts in Paris, France. 

     

    Learn more about the artist here.

  • LA/LA: Place and Practice is a two-day symposium organized by Scripps College, the Getty Foundation, the Getty Research Institute, and The San Diego Museum of Art in conjunction with Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA an initiative led by the Getty. Supported by a grant from the Getty Foundation, this two-day event will be held at The San Diego Museum of Art on Saturday, May 2, 2015 and at the Getty Center on Monday, May 4, 2015. RSVP here.

  • 33rd Annual Scholarship Benefit and Fashion Show

    Saturday, May 2, 2015
    6:30pm
    The Beverly Hilton
    Cocktails, Dinner, and Runway Fashion Show

  • LA/LA: Place and Practice is a two-day symposium organized by Scripps College, the Getty Foundation, the Getty Research Institute, and The San Diego Museum of Art in conjunction with Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA an initiative led by the Getty. Supported by a grant from the Getty Foundation, this two-day event will be held at The San Diego Museum of Art on Saturday, May 2, 2015 and at the Getty Center on Monday, May 4, 2015. RSVP here.

  • On the Roof

    May 05| Exhibition
    More

    Graduate Fine Arts Final Exhibition featuring work by

    Soo Yun Jun 
    Delia Perez Salinas Tijerina 
    Yasmin Than
    Sean Cully
    Rachel Indergaard 
    Kristy Baltezore 
    Angie Kim 

  • View work by the next generation of creative professionals in

    Architecture/Landscape/Interiors
    Communication Arts: Advertising Design, Graphic Design, Illustration
    Digital Media: Animation, Game & Entertainment Design, Motion Design
    Fashion Design: Costume Design
    Fine Arts: Painting, Photography, Sculpture/New Genres
    Product Design
    Toy Design

    Graduate Fine Arts

  • View work by the next generation of creative professionals in

    Architecture/Landscape/Interiors
    Communication Arts: Advertising Design, Graphic Design, Illustration
    Digital Media: Animation, Game & Entertainment Design, Motion Design
    Fashion Design: Costume Design
    Fine Arts: Painting, Photography, Sculpture/New Genres
    Product Design
    Toy Design

    Graduate Fine Arts

O-Tube

Research Cycle

aka "Research Strategy" and "Search Strategy"

The Research Cycle

 

1. Choose Topic

Think of a few possible topics.
List keywords and subjects.
Do some preliminary research in subject encyclopedias and easily-accessible databases.
Re-evaluate and clarify the topic as necessary.
Should I narrow this topic?
Should I broaden this topic?
Do I have enough information now?
Will I be able to find enough information easily?
Am I willing to spend more time searching?
Should I use a different or new topic?
     

2. Make a Plan

Decide how much information is needed.
Decide what types of information will be needed.
Decide on which indexes or databases you will search.
Make a timeline.
Do I need articles or books or both?
Will I need scholarly or popular resources?
Which specific databases will be best to use?
Will I need to look up background information in encyclopedias?
How much time can I spend researching?
     

3. Begin Researching

Systematically begin to follow the plan you have made.
Find citations or sources.
Evaluate each citation carefully using critical thinking skills. Decide if it's worth actually finding the item.
Is this information appropriate?
Who wrote it? Where did it come from?
Can it be trusted? Is it biased? Accurate? Timely?
Is it easily available? Or will I have to go to other libraries?
Am I still happy with this topic?
Should I start over and get a new topic?
     

4. Find the Material

Evaluate each item carefully. Is there a bibliography or are there footnotes that lead me to other important works on the topic?
Does the index or table of contents (of a book) lead me easily to the appropriate  section?
Is this information at a level that I can read and comprehend?
Does this information seem on target and important to my research?
Is this information going to help me understand my topic and write my paper?
Do I need to read this?
     

5. Read the material.

Make notes.
Remember: this is a process that requires continuing evaluation and revision.
Am I learning what I need to learn about my topic?
Am I still happy with the topic?
Have I found the information that best serves my purposes?