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Events
  • Objects In Crisis is a series of two-person exhibitions by students in the Photography 3 class. 

     

    Exhbition 1--November 18-22:  Greg Toothacre and Lani De Soto

    Reception: Thursday, November 20 @ 6 pm

     

    Exhibition 2--December 2-6:  Allison Mogan and Tia Chen

    Reception:  Thursday, December 4 @ 6 pm

     

    Exhibition 3--December 8-12: Yijia Liu and Cara Friedman

  • Graduate Fine Arts, Visiting Artist Lecture Series presents artist, Hugo Hopping.

    Thursday, November 20th 11:115am - 12:30pm

    Graduate Studios: 10455 Jefferson Blvd Culver City CA 90230

  • Patrick Tighe, FAIA, is Principal and Lead Designer of Patrick Tighe Architecture. The firm is committed to creating an authentic, contemporary Architecture informed by technology, sustainability and building innovation. Since its inception in 2004, a strong and diverse body of projects has been realized that includes city-developed affordable housing, commercial, mixed-use projects, civic art, installations and residences.

  • Otis Radio: Rap Realm

    Nov 24| Special Event
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    Creative Action and the Otis Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

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    Creative Action and the Otis Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

  • Eileen Cowin

    Nov 25| Lectures
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    Eileen Cowin is an artist who sees living as a means to break boundaries, and psychology as a way to confront us with strange attitudes or to implicate us in seemingly self-imposed spatial confinements. –Art Papers April 2007 by Eve Wood

     

O-Tube

Research Cycle

aka "Research Strategy" and "Search Strategy"

The Research Cycle

 

1. Choose Topic

Think of a few possible topics.
List keywords and subjects.
Do some preliminary research in subject encyclopedias and easily-accessible databases.
Re-evaluate and clarify the topic as necessary.
Should I narrow this topic?
Should I broaden this topic?
Do I have enough information now?
Will I be able to find enough information easily?
Am I willing to spend more time searching?
Should I use a different or new topic?
     

2. Make a Plan

Decide how much information is needed.
Decide what types of information will be needed.
Decide on which indexes or databases you will search.
Make a timeline.
Do I need articles or books or both?
Will I need scholarly or popular resources?
Which specific databases will be best to use?
Will I need to look up background information in encyclopedias?
How much time can I spend researching?
     

3. Begin Researching

Systematically begin to follow the plan you have made.
Find citations or sources.
Evaluate each citation carefully using critical thinking skills. Decide if it's worth actually finding the item.
Is this information appropriate?
Who wrote it? Where did it come from?
Can it be trusted? Is it biased? Accurate? Timely?
Is it easily available? Or will I have to go to other libraries?
Am I still happy with this topic?
Should I start over and get a new topic?
     

4. Find the Material

Evaluate each item carefully. Is there a bibliography or are there footnotes that lead me to other important works on the topic?
Does the index or table of contents (of a book) lead me easily to the appropriate  section?
Is this information at a level that I can read and comprehend?
Does this information seem on target and important to my research?
Is this information going to help me understand my topic and write my paper?
Do I need to read this?
     

5. Read the material.

Make notes.
Remember: this is a process that requires continuing evaluation and revision.
Am I learning what I need to learn about my topic?
Am I still happy with the topic?
Have I found the information that best serves my purposes?