• Todd Gray

    Oct 25| Lectures

    Todd Gray was born in 1954 in Los Angeles. Gray received an MFA and a BFA from California Institute of the Arts and is currently a professor at California State University, Long Beach. He has shown performance work at REDCAT (Roy and Edna Disney CalArts Theater), Los Angeles (2010); California African American Museum, Los Angeles (2009); the Commons, New York University (2008); 18th Street Arts Center, Santa Monica (2008); New Renaissance Theater, Syracuse, NY (2007); and Academy of Media Arts, Cologne (2004).

  • Ruby Neri is a sculptor, painter, and former street artist from San Francisco and Los Angeles, California, known for her evocative portrayal of horses.

  • Otis in NYC
    October 27, 2016 
    6 - 8 pm 
    Franklin Parrasch Gallery
    53 East 64 Street
    New York, NY 10065

    Otis College President Bruce W. Ferguson is coming to NYC! 
    Please come say hello and visit with your fellow alumni and friends of Otis College of Art and Design.
    Drinks and hors d'oeuvres.


  • Lecture takes place at 356 S. Mission Rd., co-presented with Ben Maltz Gallery in conjunction with the exhibition Polly Apfelbaum: Face (Geometry) (Naked) Eyes.

    New York-based critic and independent curator Bob Nickas presents his musings on one hundred paintings, choosing one from each year from 1915-2015.

  • Bob Nickas

    Oct 31| Lectures

    Bob Nickas is a critic and independent curator based in New York, having organized more than ninety exhibitions since 1984.
    He was Curatorial Advisor at P.S.1/MoMA in New York between 2004-07, where his exhibitions include: 
    Lee Lozano: Drawn From Life; 
    William Gedney—Christopher Wool: Into the Night; 
    Stephen Shore: American Surfaces; 
    Wolfgang Tillmans: Freedom From The Known. 

  • Looking at the recent works of Sebastian Stumpf one finds an interplay between performance and the recording of performance, between the execution of a physical act and the documentation of it by means of a camera. [He] operates in two distinct realms: in the empty spaces of contemporary art institutions and in urban settings with their preexisting orders. […] An inconspicuous architectural detail suddenly becomes the catalyst for a physical exploit…. The art gallery becomes a space for action.

  • Passionate Voices Expressed in Sound Bearing Plastic: An Evening with Collector Richard Shelton


Benefits and Uses

Benefits to Students:

  • Assists learners in making connections among learning experiences (formal and informal learning, academic, co-curricular and extra-curricular learning).
  • Promotes development of reflective learning - “Reflection … challenges students to use critical thinking to examine presented information, question its validity, and draw conclusions based on the resulting ideas” (Intime: Integrating New Technologies Into the Methods of Education). This type of learning is developmental, self-directive, and lifelong.
  • Provides a history of development and growth to assist in planning future learning needs based on previous successes and failures.
  • Further addresses Information Literacy through protocols for obtaining permissions and documenting Internet sources.
  • Helps students gain knowledge about how they represent themselves on the web  through purposeful collection and presentation of information that conveys a web-savvy, deliberately constructed virtual identity.
  • Personal control of learning history (as compared to organizations controlling learner history) and manage various levels of access to their portfolios.
  • Expand students’ understanding of visual rhetoric.

Benefits to Faculty:

  • Encourages students to link artifacts to learning outcomes.
  • Allows faculty to better sequence and scaffold learning outcomes at different developmental stages.
  • Supports transferability of common learning outcomes by linking artifacts to other courses.
  • Can use Learning Portfolio assessment to improve teaching strategies.
  • Provides a vehicle for more authentic assessment over time as creates an assessment-trail that is centralized and under learner control.
  • Means to share content with other faculty.
  • Prepare student learners for life-long learning.

Benefits to Otis Community:

  • Provides a system to demonstrate college-wide learning outcomes.
  • Encourages collaboration among departments to articulate common learning outcomes and shared assessment goals.
  • Provides a way to synthesize the students’ academic experiences, strengthen curricular coherence, and provide a potential venue for the growing prominence of extra-curricular experiences.
  • Demonstrates applications and critical literacies for course or programmatic assessment.
  • Contributes to idea of education as lifelong learning - students are able to adapt their Learning Portfolios to various purposes and uses beyond their academic careers (with the potential of ongoing alumni relationships and longitudinal tracking).
Otis College Ranked 6th in Nation by The Economist