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  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring John Houck, a Los Angeles-based artist. Read more about him here.
    Contact: Soo Kim, skim@otis.edu
  • Jesse Benson (b. 1978) is an artist based in Los Angeles. Benson's complex practice is driven by the perversion of roles and representation that characterize his generational moment. In obsessively "skillful" objects like the Bureau Paintings, Catalog Page Paintings, Future Sculptures, and Repaintings, Benson constantly questions the authenticity of the document, the function of style, and the value of both art and artist. Benson is equally committed to a curatorial/organizational practice that openly overlaps and inspires his object production.

  • The Architecture/Landscape/Interiors Department at OTIS College of Art and Design is pleased to announce a lecture by Nick SeierupPrincipal | Design Director of Perkins+Will, Los Angeles, on Thursday, December 3, 2015.


  • Marisa Silver is the author most recently of the New York Times bestselling novel Mary Coin. Her other books include the novels No Direction Home and The God of War (a finalist for a Los Angeles Times Book Prize), as well as two story collections, Babe in Paradise and Alone with You. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker and been included in many anthologies, including The Best American Short Stories and The O. Henry Prize Stories. Silver lives in Los Angeles.

  • Jesse Lerner is a filmmaker based in Los Angeles.  His short films Natives (1991, with Scott Sterling), T.S.H. (2004) and Magnavoz (2006) and the feature-length experimental documentaries Frontierland/Fronterilandia (1995, with Rubén Ortiz-Torres), Ruins (1999) The American Egypt (2001), Atomic Sublime (2010) and The Absent Stone (2013, with Sandra Rozental) have won numerous prizes at film festivals in the United States, Latin America and Japan.

  • Otis faculty member Dana Berman Duff will present a program of short 16mm and digital films in her "Catalogue" series.

  • Performing the Grid is an exhibition that brings together an intergenerational group of artists and cultural producers that utilize the grid as a performative strategy to examine, challenge and position philosophical, political, social, domestic, corporeal, and mythical perspectives. Rosalind Kraus famously wrote that the grid “functions to declare the modernity of modern art” in her 1979 essay, Grids.


Student Centered Learning and Learning e-Portfolios

In higher education, student-centered instructional strategies are challenging the traditional lecture model. Instead of the “sage on the stage” delivering information (one-way model), institutions are promoting learning models where students collaboratively solve problems and reflect on their experiences (two-way/exchange model).

This new approach acknowledges the significance of learning that happens in communities, on the job, from personal knowledge networks, and throughout one’s lifetime. As a learning tool, a Learning ePortfolio can provide actual evidence of achievement, permitting the learner to display competence through inclusion of multiple media types and artifacts.

Learning ePortfolios can facilitate student reflection on their own learning, leading to more awareness of learning strategies and needs. Also, Learning ePortfolios address several issues: synthesizing the students’ academic experiences, strengthening curricular coherence, and providing a potential venue for the growing prominence of extra-curricular experiences.

Additionally, because of the impact of technology in society, many learners entering college are technologically proficient and familiar with the online world where sharing photos and experiences in social forums are standard expressions of their knowledge and interests. Students are likely to be quite comfortable with Learning ePortfolios. For those students not used to this technology, developing technological proficiency in creating content online will satisfy another important learning goal.



Paolo Freire argued that when one does not reflect on what one is doing or on information being received, one becomes passive and easily led:

“As learners we are constantly constructing, revising, and reconstructing our knowledge and beliefs to create a new framework of understanding. Reflection is the engine that drives this process. Through reflection students build upon and develop existing understandings to generate new knowledge.”

“Reflection … challenges students to use critical thinking to examine presented information, question its validity, and draw conclusions based on the resulting ideas” (Intime: Integrating New Technologies Into the Methods of Education).


Additional Research

Two relevant articles from Peer Review, AAC&U, Winter 2009:


Helen Barrett's website focused on reseach and pedagogy on e-portfolios:



The following sites are examples of how E‐Portfolios have been utilized at other Colleges and Universities: