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Events
  • Otis Books is pleased to publish Tim Erickson’s debut collection of poetry, Egopolis, a textual journey through destruction, resistance, city, and the Ego, from ancient times to the present day. Erickson’s work has appeared in the Chicago Review, Western Humanities Review, and the Salt Anthology of New Writing. He lives in Salt Lake City.

  • Otis Graduate Writing students will read from their works-in-progress.

  • David Treuer is an Ojibwe Indian from Leech Lake Reservation in northern Minnesota and currently teaches at USC. He is the author of the novels Little, The Hiawatha, The Translation of Dr. Apelles, named a Best Book of the Year by the Washington Post, as well as a critical work, Native American Fiction: A User's Manual. In 2012, he published another nonfiction work, Rez Life.

  • Angela Flournoy’s first novel The Turner House was a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection. Her fiction has appeared in The Paris Review, and she has written for The New Republic, The Los Angeles Review of Books and elsewhere. Flournoy has taught at the University of Iowa and Trinity Washington University. She lives in Los Angeles.

  • Susan Choi’s first novel, The Foreign Student, won the Asian-American Literary Award for fiction, and her second novel, American Woman, was a finalist for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize. Her most recent novel, A Person of Interest, was a finalist for the 2009 PEN/Faulkner Award. With David Remnick she co-edited the anthology Wonderful Town: New York Stories from The New Yorker. A recipient of fellowships from the NEA and the Guggenheim Foundation, and in 2010, the inaugural winner of the PEN/W.G. Sebald Award, Choi lives in Brooklyn.

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OtisDID Help

OtisDID

What is the OtisDID?

The Otis Digital Image Database is an imagebank of art historical and design images intended for educational and instructional use only. Faculty, students, and staff of Otis College may log in to the Otis DID to create “slideshows” for study and educational purposes. You can even use these digital images in the classroom instead of slides. Since this is a web application, you may access this site 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

How do I login?

Use your email username and password to log in. If you have forgotten your password, you will need to go in person to Academic Computing (students) or Information Systems (faculty and staff) to reset it.

What can Faculty do with the OtisDID?

  • Search across multiple collections
  • Create slideshows
  • Organize slideshows within folders
  • Save searches
  • Select favorites
  • Add your own images to your personal collections
  • Package slide shows for off-line viewing
  • Add notes to an image which will be carried into multiple slideshows


What can Students do with the OtisDID?

  • Search across multiple collections
  • Create slideshows
  • Access active slideshows created by their teachers
  • Print out slideshows with thumbnails
  • Create flash cards from active slideshows


Where can I get training on the OtisDID?

One-on-one, workshops, in-class demos, and more options are available. Please contact Heather Cleary in the Visual Resources Center for scheduling. The TLC usually holds one or two workshops for faculty each term.

Also check out the Library Blog for announcements and updates.

Do you have any handouts?

Yes:

The images I need for class are not in the OtisDID.

We are continually adding images to the imagebank and are always happy to receive requests. Please follow these procedures.

Can I add my own images to the OtisDID?

Faculty can create a personal collection by using the My Images feature under MyMDID. Directions are available in the handouts above. For best results in the the classroon, the images should be at least 1000px in on the longest side.
Students may not upload their own images.

I cannot find the Image Viewer on the Mac in the Smart Classroom. Help!

The stand-alone Image Viewer program does not work on Macs running OS Lion and higher. Instead, use the online Media Viewer. More information in this announcement.

Are there any other image databases available to the Otis Community?

Yes. Please visit the Image Databases and Resources page provided by the Otis Library for the most current list.

What is MDID?

Madison Digital image Database (MDID) is the underlying software. It was developed at James Madison University for art historians by art historians.

How do I report a bug? or have a suggestion?

Please contact Heather Cleary in the VRC.