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  • Otis Books is pleased to publish Tim Erickson’s debut collection of poetry, Egopolis, a textual journey through destruction, resistance, city, and the Ego, from ancient times to the present day. Erickson’s work has appeared in the Chicago Review, Western Humanities Review, and the Salt Anthology of New Writing. He lives in Salt Lake City.

  • Otis Graduate Writing students will read from their works-in-progress.

  • David Treuer is an Ojibwe Indian from Leech Lake Reservation in northern Minnesota and currently teaches at USC. He is the author of the novels Little, The Hiawatha, The Translation of Dr. Apelles, named a Best Book of the Year by the Washington Post, as well as a critical work, Native American Fiction: A User's Manual. In 2012, he published another nonfiction work, Rez Life.

  • Angela Flournoy’s first novel The Turner House was a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection. Her fiction has appeared in The Paris Review, and she has written for The New Republic, The Los Angeles Review of Books and elsewhere. Flournoy has taught at the University of Iowa and Trinity Washington University. She lives in Los Angeles.

  • Susan Choi’s first novel, The Foreign Student, won the Asian-American Literary Award for fiction, and her second novel, American Woman, was a finalist for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize. Her most recent novel, A Person of Interest, was a finalist for the 2009 PEN/Faulkner Award. With David Remnick she co-edited the anthology Wonderful Town: New York Stories from The New Yorker. A recipient of fellowships from the NEA and the Guggenheim Foundation, and in 2010, the inaugural winner of the PEN/W.G. Sebald Award, Choi lives in Brooklyn.

O-Tube

Soo Kim: 2006-07 Faculty Development Grant Report


Report:

In 2006-07 I received a Faculty Development Grant to support the development of a body of work that alters and slows the reading of the photographic image, to move away from simply what is depicted, and toward a reading of an image that is changed by the removal of some of the image's parts.

The process of making this body of work included photographing images as well as making a video. Both elements were informed by ideas of absence, removal, silence, and the delivery of meaning. I was interested in making a parallel between stage directions in plays and the physical removal of parts of the photographic image from the single photographic image – using these voids and absences to slow down the photograph as well as give meaning to silences and empty spaces.

This project allowed me to use my practice of cutting into photographs in a different way. Rather than using this subtractive method to add narrative elements to my photographs, with this project I excised parts of the photograph and brought a different dimensionality to the imagery depicted. Instead of cutting shapes and figures that were identifiable, the cuts took on a more geometric form that had to do with the imagery recorded in the photograph. I made a work that considered the materiality of the photographic medium differently than the way I had addressed these ideas in previous bodies of work.

Soo Kim

Work by Soo Kim

Soo Kim

Midnight Reykjavic #11

Soo Kim

Work by Soo Kim