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  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring John Houck, a Los Angeles-based artist. Read more about him here.
    Contact: Soo Kim, skim@otis.edu
  • Jesse Benson (b. 1978) is an artist based in Los Angeles. Benson's complex practice is driven by the perversion of roles and representation that characterize his generational moment. In obsessively "skillful" objects like the Bureau Paintings, Catalog Page Paintings, Future Sculptures, and Repaintings, Benson constantly questions the authenticity of the document, the function of style, and the value of both art and artist. Benson is equally committed to a curatorial/organizational practice that openly overlaps and inspires his object production.

  • The Architecture/Landscape/Interiors Department at OTIS College of Art and Design is pleased to announce a lecture by Nick SeierupPrincipal | Design Director of Perkins+Will, Los Angeles, on Thursday, December 3, 2015.


  • Marisa Silver is the author most recently of the New York Times bestselling novel Mary Coin. Her other books include the novels No Direction Home and The God of War (a finalist for a Los Angeles Times Book Prize), as well as two story collections, Babe in Paradise and Alone with You. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker and been included in many anthologies, including The Best American Short Stories and The O. Henry Prize Stories. Silver lives in Los Angeles.

  • Jesse Lerner is a filmmaker based in Los Angeles.  His short films Natives (1991, with Scott Sterling), T.S.H. (2004) and Magnavoz (2006) and the feature-length experimental documentaries Frontierland/Fronterilandia (1995, with Rubén Ortiz-Torres), Ruins (1999) The American Egypt (2001), Atomic Sublime (2010) and The Absent Stone (2013, with Sandra Rozental) have won numerous prizes at film festivals in the United States, Latin America and Japan.

  • Otis faculty member Dana Berman Duff will present a program of short 16mm and digital films in her "Catalogue" series.

  • Performing the Grid is an exhibition that brings together an intergenerational group of artists and cultural producers that utilize the grid as a performative strategy to examine, challenge and position philosophical, political, social, domestic, corporeal, and mythical perspectives. Rosalind Kraus famously wrote that the grid “functions to declare the modernity of modern art” in her 1979 essay, Grids.


Aug 27, 2013
Albert Valdez (’10) Education Coordinator, LACMA
Spotlight Category: Alumni
by Albert Valdez (’10)

The Artists, Community, and Teaching (ACT) program was a valuable experience not only in terms of learning and developing the pedagogy associated with museum education but also in defining who I am as an artist. The program encourages the connection between an artist’s studio practice and the surrounding community, and putting into practice theories and principles of community arts education. As an ACT student, I participated in lesson planning, pedagogy theories, classroom observation, and hands-on teaching alongside my peers. The internship program placed us in a real world environment to work with professionals in a wide spectrum of educational programs. I was fortunate to intern with the LACMA Education Department, assisting museum educators in a gallery and studio environment.

No job was too small for a LACMA office/ teacher assistant—prepping, stapling, folding, filing, and listening led to a teaching position with the NexGen Program, which provides membership to children under the age of 18. NexGen members visit the museum for free, experience several art-making opportunities, and can invite an adult as their free guest. My NexGen experience led to teaching in the LACMA’s OnSite Library workshops, whichprovide intergenerational learning for all family members. These art education programs paved the way for me to lead my very own program—LACMA’s OnSite School Program.

The OnSite School Program introduces LAUSD students to the Museum’s encyclopedic collection. Each year, we partner with six elementary schools and two middle schools, visiting Special Ed and Pre-K-8 classrooms, where museum educators develop and lead one-hour art-making workshops. The Museum educators provide six art-making workshops per LAUSD classroom. LACMA’s mission is to support current arts programming in LAUSD schools by making personal and meaningful connections between LACMA’s encyclopedic collection and student learning, while building a strong presence in the community. With each visit, students focus on descriptive language to support their ideas and relate their art-making process to their own experience, knowledge and background. By reflecting and reinforcing their conversations about art with art making, students make a personal connection to the arts.

Along with participating in LACMA’s commitment to art education in the underserved areas of Los Angeles, I have worked with fellow alumni on the MobileMuralLab project, and with nonprofi ts such as the San Gabriel Conservation Corps. These groups educate the community on the importance of the arts as an integral part of everyone’s personal education. As an artist and community member, I intend to answer the call and do my best to make sure the arts stay in the minds of future generations.

Albert Valdez is the Education Coordinator for the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) Education Department. He maintains a painting studio in Culver City and participates in the monthly art walks. Valdez is also actively engaged in raising community awareness of art through project-based workshops and mural programs.

“ I love that together we [LACMA & Otis] are fostering a new generation of artists who will include public engagement in their practice.”
—Karen Satzman, Director of Youth and Family Programs LACMA Education Department