Events
  • Tim Walsh, is the inventor of the board game Blurt!, which sold more than a milion copies. Tim has lincesned toy and game concepts to Hasbro, Mattel, Brio, Educational Insights, Imagine Entertaiment, and others. Be inspired and entertained by the stories behind the creation of blockbuster toys and games.

     

  • James Hannaham

    Jan 25| Lectures
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    James Hannaham is the author of the novels Delicious Foods, which won the 2016 PEN/Faulkner Award, and God Says No, a Stonewall Honor Book and a Lambda Literary Award finalist.

  • Opening Reception and Acoustic Event: “Tuning the Room” lead by Gregory Lenczycki and Ken Goerres. Gastronomic tuning tastings and elixirs provided by Eden Batki.
     

  • The measure and alterations of Craycroft’s “room tuning” are framed in relation to its setting within the art gallery of an art school. In the wake of the U.S. presidential election, and in anticipation of the exhibition runtime falling during the first months of the new administration, Tuning the Room is a proposal to pay attention to the role that art and art education play in how voices are heard.

  • Robin Coste Lewis won the National Book Award for Voyage of the Sable Venus. Her writing has appeared in The Massachusetts Review, Callaloo, The Harvard Gay & Lesbian Review, Transition: Women in Literary Arts, VIDA, Phantom Limb, and Lambda Literary Review. She has taught at Wheaton, Hunter, Hampshire, and the NYU Low-Residency MFA in Paris. Lewis is a fellow of Cave Canem and of the Los Angeles Institute for the Humanities, as well as a Provost’s Fellow in Poetry and Visual Studies at USC.

  • Artist Anna Craycroft, of the current exhibition Tuning the Room in Ben Maltz Gallery, in discussion with artist and curator Micah Silver.

  • Solmaz Sharif

    Mar 01| Lectures
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    Solmaz Sharif’s first collection, Look, was recently published by Graywolf Press and is a 2016 National Book Award finalist. Her poetry has appeared in the New Republic, Granta, Poetry, and other journals. Her first collection, Look, was recently published by Graywolf Press. A former Stegner Fellow, she is currently a lecturer at Stanford University and lives in the Bay Area.

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Annetta Kapon ‘85 Fine Arts, Moscow

Dec 16, 2013
Spotlight Category: Alumni
Graduate Fine Arts Assistant Chair and Professor Annetta Kapon spent several days at Moscow’s National Center for Contemporary Art for the exhibition and conference “In Transition Russia,” in 2008.
 
We had a lovely Soviet-type apartment with two bedrooms, kitchen, living room, and bath, but the toilet was outside the apartment. During the day we spent some time in Red Square, the Kremlin, and Lenin’s mausoleum, and had tea in GUM, the famous shopping mall.Our flight from Moscow to Ekaterinburg was four hours late, so when we arrived we were taken directly to the Ural Gorky University where we gave talks about our work to the students of visual studies. The conversation afterwards was more about how things are in the U.S. than about our work. All of this was done though an interpreter, who was one of the students.
 
At the conference, “In Transition: Cultural Identities in the Age of Transnational and Transcultural Flux,” I presented my work, and other presentations focused on issues such as a critique of multiculturalism as official ideology, the new post-Soviet citizen identity, and gender citizenship. For me the highlight was going to lunch in the student cafeteria with the graduate women students from the Germanic Languages department, who had simultaneously translated the conference talks. I wanted to find out about what it’s like to grow up in a post-Soviet era, where/ how they live, etc.
 
Between 1924 and 1991, Ekaterinburg was known as Sverdlovsk, after the Bolshevik leader Yakov Sverdlov. We stayed in the very nice Central Hotel for four nights. My most vivid memory will be of the suffocating heat in the room. Every indoor space in Russia, including the university, is heated to 80 degrees. Outside: 20-30 degrees. On our last day in Ekaterinburg, we were taken on a tour of the city’s major monuments: the War Memorial, popularly known as the Black Tulip, and the famous “Church on the Blood,” on the site where the last Tsar, Nicholas Romanov, was executed by the Bolsheviks in 1918. Tsar Nicholas has now been canonized by the Orthodox Church, and is the object of renewed popular nostalgia and affection. 
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