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Events
  • Bauhaus Dances

    Feb 07| Screening
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    Bauhaus Dances, 1986 presented by Debra McCall
    Sunday, February 7, 4pm, Otis Forum, Free

  • Jillian Mayer is an artist and filmmaker living in South Florida. Her video works and performances have been premiered at galleries and museums internationally such as MoMA, MoCA:NoMi, BAM, Bass Museum, the Contemporary Museum of Montreal with the Montreal Biennial (2014) and film festivals such as Sundance, SXSW, and the New York Film Festival. She was recently featured in Art Papers, ArtNews and Art Forum discussing identity, Internet and her artistic practices and influences.
  • York Chang (b. 1973, St. Louis, MO) is an interdisciplinary artist who uses forensic and archival information systems as supports for poetic gestures and alternate histories, in order to interrogate the aesthetic conventions of authority which often serve to blur the line between fiction and reality. He earned both his BFA (1996) and Juris Doctorate (2001) from University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). York Chang lives and works in Los Angeles, CA, and is represented by Greene Exhibitions. 
     
  • Presidents' Day Holiday

    Feb 15| Academic Dates
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    Otis offices are closed for the Holiday.

  • Oliver Kellhammer is an independent artist, writer and researcher, who seeks, through his botanical interventions and social art practice, to demonstrate nature’s surprising ability to recover from damage. His recent work has focused on the psychosocial effects of climate change, cleaning up contaminated soils, reintroducing prehistoric trees to landscape damaged by industrial logging and cataloging the ecology of brownfield ecologies. He currently works as a lecturer in sustainable systems at Parsons in New York City.
     
  • In this performance I try to summarize In search of past time with my own words, as a story of another time which reveals itself contemporary. I deliver my own intimate and personal perception of this book which radiates in my life. Each performance is another opportunity to explore different zones of the book, proceeding at random, inspired by an aleatory and fickle memory. 
     
  • The Architecture/Landscape/Interiors Department at Otis College of Art and Design is pleased to announce the George H. Scanlon Foundation Lecture REDUX.4 by IÑAKI ÁBALOS

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Annetta Kapon ‘85 Fine Arts, Moscow

Dec 16, 2013
Spotlight Category: Alumni
Graduate Fine Arts Assistant Chair and Professor Annetta Kapon spent several days at Moscow’s National Center for Contemporary Art for the exhibition and conference “In Transition Russia,” in 2008.
 
We had a lovely Soviet-type apartment with two bedrooms, kitchen, living room, and bath, but the toilet was outside the apartment. During the day we spent some time in Red Square, the Kremlin, and Lenin’s mausoleum, and had tea in GUM, the famous shopping mall.Our flight from Moscow to Ekaterinburg was four hours late, so when we arrived we were taken directly to the Ural Gorky University where we gave talks about our work to the students of visual studies. The conversation afterwards was more about how things are in the U.S. than about our work. All of this was done though an interpreter, who was one of the students.
 
At the conference, “In Transition: Cultural Identities in the Age of Transnational and Transcultural Flux,” I presented my work, and other presentations focused on issues such as a critique of multiculturalism as official ideology, the new post-Soviet citizen identity, and gender citizenship. For me the highlight was going to lunch in the student cafeteria with the graduate women students from the Germanic Languages department, who had simultaneously translated the conference talks. I wanted to find out about what it’s like to grow up in a post-Soviet era, where/ how they live, etc.
 
Between 1924 and 1991, Ekaterinburg was known as Sverdlovsk, after the Bolshevik leader Yakov Sverdlov. We stayed in the very nice Central Hotel for four nights. My most vivid memory will be of the suffocating heat in the room. Every indoor space in Russia, including the university, is heated to 80 degrees. Outside: 20-30 degrees. On our last day in Ekaterinburg, we were taken on a tour of the city’s major monuments: the War Memorial, popularly known as the Black Tulip, and the famous “Church on the Blood,” on the site where the last Tsar, Nicholas Romanov, was executed by the Bolsheviks in 1918. Tsar Nicholas has now been canonized by the Orthodox Church, and is the object of renewed popular nostalgia and affection. 
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