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  • Otis Books is pleased to publish Tim Erickson’s debut collection of poetry, Egopolis, a textual journey through destruction, resistance, city, and the Ego, from ancient times to the present day. Erickson’s work has appeared in the Chicago Review, Western Humanities Review, and the Salt Anthology of New Writing. He lives in Salt Lake City.

  • Otis Graduate Writing students will read from their works-in-progress.

  • David Treuer is an Ojibwe Indian from Leech Lake Reservation in northern Minnesota and currently teaches at USC. He is the author of the novels Little, The Hiawatha, The Translation of Dr. Apelles, named a Best Book of the Year by the Washington Post, as well as a critical work, Native American Fiction: A User's Manual. In 2012, he published another nonfiction work, Rez Life.

  • Angela Flournoy’s first novel The Turner House was a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection. Her fiction has appeared in The Paris Review, and she has written for The New Republic, The Los Angeles Review of Books and elsewhere. Flournoy has taught at the University of Iowa and Trinity Washington University. She lives in Los Angeles.

  • Susan Choi’s first novel, The Foreign Student, won the Asian-American Literary Award for fiction, and her second novel, American Woman, was a finalist for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize. Her most recent novel, A Person of Interest, was a finalist for the 2009 PEN/Faulkner Award. With David Remnick she co-edited the anthology Wonderful Town: New York Stories from The New Yorker. A recipient of fellowships from the NEA and the Guggenheim Foundation, and in 2010, the inaugural winner of the PEN/W.G. Sebald Award, Choi lives in Brooklyn.

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Sustainability for Students

The College demonstrates its commitment to sustainability throughout its facilities. Ahmanson Hall was retrofitted from a former IBM research facility, while the North Building was retrofitted from a former bank. The Galef Fine Arts Building was designed according to green principles using low-energy glass and HVAC systems. To reduce waste and conserve energy, Ahmanson Hall employs a highly efficient cooling tower heat exchanger system; computer-controlled "smart" variable speed heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC), thermostats, and elevators; and new water bottle filling stations. Across campus grey-water is used for the sprinklers, nonemergency lighting is sensor-controlled, hand dryers reduce paper waste, energy-efficient ceramic kilns are fired during low peak hours, and lighting with ballast and fluorescent tubes all save energy and resources. In addition, the Café offers eco-friendly packaging and discounts for bringing your own cups, while College publications use Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) recycled paper and printing methods.

One of the most important ways that students can contribute to Otis’ sustainability initiatives is by separating trash and recyclables into the proper receptacles on campus, taking care not to mix the different types. Excess materials and supplies can be donated to the campus Resource Exchange (located behind the ground floor wood/metal shop in the parking garage). Students can also trade for needed materials and supplies that may be in stock throughout the year, and on our Annual UpCycle Day, held on the second Wednesday each fall. Students are also encouraged to carpool, bike or take public transportation to and from campus.

More information about Otis’ sustainability initiatives is at www.otis.edu/sustainability/college-wide-initiatives.

Find out how you can minor in Sustainability.